I.O.C. World Bird List Version 8.2 – Updated

Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

Gray Jay now Canada Jay (Perisoreus canadensis) by Raymond Barlow

“For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.” (Colossians 1:16-17 KJV)

I finally finished updating the Birds of the World pages to reflect the newest version, 8.2. of the IOC’s bird list. The family pages and the indexes have been modified. Since the photos on the site were hacked last year, the family pages were changed. Now the photos are at the bottom of the pages instead of with each name.

With this version, I added the Genera in with Green. Many of the new changes are in red and a few in blue. The red are spelling or Genera changes. Blue seems to represent reshuffled positions within a family. [I think – this is from their Excel spreadsheet]

White-crested Helmetshrike (Prionops plumatus) ©WikiC

Two families were moved into the Vangidae – Vanga and Allies family.

Here is the over update:

The IOC World Bird List 8.2 contains 10,711 extant species (and 158 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  246 Families (plus 1 Incertae Sedis) and 2,313 Genera.  The list also includes 20,055 subspecies, their ranges and authors.

Changes include:

SPECIES ADDED:                15 

SPECIES DELETED:             3

ENGLISH NAMES:               18

TAXONOMY:                         18 incl revisions of  Campephagidae, Phylloscopidae and Locustellidae, and expansion of Vangidae to include helmetshrikes, woodshrikes, and shrike-flycatchers

Large woodshrike (Tephrodornis gularis) ©WikiC

The three articles listed in the Time For Another Update From The I.O.C. explain the changes and saves me rewriting the same information.

2018 AOS Supplement is Out!

2018 checklist changes include few splits

David Sibley: How to make peace with changes to your checklist

The Indexes, Alphabetical Pages and Family Pages are all current here on the site:

Birds of the World

Alphabetical List of the Birds.

ORDER

Family

Families – Alphabetical (Scientific)

Families – Alphabetical (English)

Families – Taxonomic (Scientific – English)

Families – Taxonomic (English – Scientific)

Species Index

I.O.C. Version 6.2 Has Come Out

Intermediate Egret (Egretta intermedia)

Intermediate Egret (Egretta intermedia) is now (Ardea intermedia) 6.2 Taxonomy Change

“For I am the LORD, I change not;…” (Malachi 3:6 KJV)

The I.O.C. released their latest version, and I have started updated the blog to reflect those changes. It takes time, but I have the “Last, First” name’s lists up and running. In the I. O. C. 6.1 Updated post, I mentioned that I would catch on the next version. It is the hardest one to get ready, so, I decided to do it first.

Streak-chested (Spectacled) Antpitta (Hylopezus perspicillatus) by Ian

Streak-chested (Spectacled) Antpitta (Hylopezus perspicillatus) by Ian

As the name implies, the birds are listed as “Sparrow, House” or “Duck, Wood”.  These lists are especially handy when trying to find birds that have the same last name, but are not in the same bird family. An example would be Antpitta. Almost all of them are in the Grallariidae family, yet two of them are over in the Gnateater-Conopophagidae family. The Streak-chested is in with most of the Antpittas in the Grallarridae and this Black-crowned and the Rufous-crowned Antpitta are down in the next family of Gnateaters.

Black-crowned Antpitta (Pittasoma michleri) ©WikiC

Black-crowned Antpitta (Pittasoma michleri) ©WikiC

That is just one example. There are many other uses for the links. Lord willing, I plan on having the normal “First Name-Last Name” list up later this evening. Then I will make the actual species updates.

The IOC World Bird List 6.2 contains 10,637 extant species (and 154 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  239 Families (plus 2 Incertae Sedis) and 2289 Genera and 20,601 Subspecies. They added 22 new species, changed the names of 8 species and made 4 taxonomy changes. Those will be updated as soon as the indexes are changed. Stay Tuned!

Links to the Indexes:

Birds of the World – Species Index

Last Name of Bird

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I. O. C. 6.1 Updated

Grallarridae-Gnatcatchers Family

Gnateater-Conopophagidae Family

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I.O.C. Version 5.2 Updated

Ashy Gerygone (Gerygone cinerea) ©PNG Katerina Tvardikova

Grey Thornbill (Acanthiza cinerea) – (was the Ashy Gerygone) ©PNG Katerina Tvardikova

For the last few days I have been updating to the new I.O.C. Version 5.2. This update wasn’t too bad.

“The IOC World Bird List 5.2 contains 10,567 extant species (and 149 extinct species)  classified in 40 Orders,  238 Families (plus 2 Incertae Sedis) and 2277 Genera.  The list also includes 20,803 subspecies.” I don’t list the subspecies here.

Version 5.2 added 10 species:

And Deleted 3 species:

  • Forsten’s Megapode (Megapodius forsteni)
  • Central Nicobar Serpent Eagle (Spilornis [cheela] minimus)
  • Northern Parrotbill (Paradoxornis polivanovi)

They changed the name of 8 species:

Bluebonnet (Northiella haematogaster) to Eastern Bluebonnet
Swan River Honeyeater (Melithreptus chloropsis) to Gilbert’s Honeyeater
Wattled Honeyeater (Foulehaio carunculatus) to Greater Wattled Honeyeater
Giant Honeyeater (Gymnomyza viridis) to Yellow-billed Honeyeater
Ashy Gerygone (Acanthiza [Gerygone] cinerea) to Grey Thornbill
Chestnut-backed Quail-thrush (Cinclosoma castanotum) to Chestnut Quail-thrush
Mottled Whistler (Rhagologus leucostigma) to Mottled Berryhunter
Blue Seedeater (Amaurospiza concolor) to Cabanis’s Seedeater

They changed 2 scientific names:

  • Ashy Gerygone – Gerygone cinerea to Acanthiza cinerea (then changed the name to Grey Thornbill – see above)
  • Yellow-bellied Fantail – Chelidorhynx hypoxantha to Chelidorhynx hypoxanthus

As far as I know, all Family pages and all the Indexes have been changed. The Update is so new that photos are difficult to locate at this time. Many of the “new species” are subspecies raised to specie level. I am sure the Lord knows all about how many birds He Created and where they all are.

My son, fear thou the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change: (Proverbs 24:21 KJV)

For I am the LORD, I change not; (Malachi 3:6a KJV)

Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever. (Hebrews 13:8 KJV)

Birds of the World

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Bible Birds Finally Moved Here

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) by Ray

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) by Ray

And let the beauty of the LORD our God be upon us: and establish thou the work of our hands upon us; yea, the work of our hands establish thou it. (Psalms 90:17 KJV)

Man goeth forth unto his work and to his labour until the evening. (Psalms 104:23 KJV)

Been working most of the day, moving the Bible Birds pages to here at Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures. It has been a challenge, but with dust still flying, they are now here.

I posted an article on the Birds of the Bible For Kids blog explaining the move of those articles. You might want to read that article because it affects this blog.

Changes On The Way

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

Wrinkled Hornbill (Aceros corrugatus) Brevard Zoo by Lee

You can find the Bible Birds listed in the Kid’s Section. The side menu is now working also for that section. (I think it’s correct). Just hover your mouse over the Kid’s Section and you will see the Bible Birds, along with the Watching Birds, Bird Tales and Scripture Alphabet of Animals sections.

Now that the Bible Bird pages are here, I can start improving them and the regular Birds of the Bible sections.

Thanks you for being patient while things are being moved around and I trust you will see much improvement soon. As mentioned in the Changes on the Way article, “Our purpose is to Glorify Our Lord and show forth His great creation through His Birds and other Critters.”

There is still lots of work ahead, as other sections are moved to this blog. Just wanted to let you know why things are changing and dust is flying still. I have another big challenge coming next, but that will have to hold for now.

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Updated to the I.O.C. Version 3.5

Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli) ©WikiC

Mountain Chickadee (Poecile gambeli) ©WikiC

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

The newest update for the I.O.C. Version 3.5 came out September 30th. Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Birds of the World has the latest changes.  There are now “10,507 extant species and 150 extinct species classified in 40 Orders, 232 Families (plus 5 Incertae Sedis) and 2284 Genera.  The list also includes 20,967 subspecies.”

After making changes to around 300 pages, you should be able to find one of those 10,507 avian friends with out too much difficulty. What did they change?

They (I.O.C.) added 22 new species, deleted 2 that they turned back to just a subspecies, changed the names or spelling of 47 birds (37 of those changed the name Madagascar to Madagascan), plus they made 30 taxonomy changes.

In those taxonomy changes, they took the Paridae – Tits, Chickadees family and threw it up in the air and let it fall totally different. At least, that is my description of it. Actually, because of DNA studies, they found that the birds are related differently in the family than they thought. They also shuffled the Aratinga species of Parakeets around.

These are the new birds that they added:

Reunion Sheldgoose (Alopochen kervazoi)
Ameline Swiftlet (Aerodramus amelis)
Ochre-backed Woodpecker (Celeus ochraceus)
Iberian Green Woodpecker (Picus sharpe)
Mistletoe Tyrannulet (Zimmerius parvus)
Venezuelan Tyrannulet (Zimmerius petersi)
Coopmans’s Tyrannulet (Zimmerius minimus)
Chico’s Tyrannulet (Zimmerius chicomendesi)
Junin Tapaculo (Scytalopus gettyae)
Delta Amacuro Softtail (Thripophaga amacurensis)
Pale-blue Monarch (Hypothymis puella)
Ua Pou Monarch (Pomarea mira) Extant – based on a recent sighting
Caspian Tit (Poecile hyrcanus)
Sierra Madre Ground Warbler (Robsonius thompsoni)
Cambodian Tailorbird (Orthotomus chaktomuk)
Chinese Wren-babbler (Pnoepyga mutica)
Zappey’s Flycatcher (Cyanoptila cumatilis)
Magnificent Sunbird (Aethopyga magnifica)
Maroon-naped Sunbird (Aethopyga guimarasensis)
Bohol Sunbird (Aethopyga decorosa)
Luzon Sunbird (Aethopyga jefferyi)
Zarudny’s Sparrow (Passer zarudnyi)
Taiwan Rosefinch (Carpodacus formosanus)

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(Black-faced) Quailfinch (Ortygospiza atricollis) ©WikiC

(Black-faced) Quailfinch (Ortygospiza atricollis) ©WikiC Now only called a Quailfinch

These are the two they deleted. They went back to being supspecies of the Black-faced Quailfinch, which is now only called a Quailfinch (Ortygospiza atricollis).

African Quailfinch (Ortygospiza fuscocrissa)
Black-chinned Quailfinch (Ortygospiza gabonensis)

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Madagascan Pochard (Aythya innotata) ©WikiC

Madagascan Pochard (Aythya innotata) ©WikiC

Their spelling changes caused me to hunt down 37 Madagascar birds and rename them Madagascan. Here are those changes:

Madagascan Blue Pigeon (Alectroenas madagascariensis)
Madagascan Buttonquail (Turnix nigricollis)
Madagascan Buzzard (Buteo brachypterus)
Madagascan Cisticola (Cisticola cherina)
Madagascan Cuckoo (Cuculus rochii)
Madagascan Cuckoo-Hawk (Aviceda madagascariensis)
Madagascan Cuckooshrike (Coracina cinerea)
Madagascan Fish Eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides)
Madagascan Flufftail (Sarothrura insularis)
Madagascan Grebe (Tachybaptus pelzelnii)
Madagascan Green Pigeon (Treron australis)
Madagascan Harrier-Hawk (Polyboroides radiatus)
Madagascan Hoopoe (Upupa marginata)
Madagascan Ibis (Lophotibis cristata)
Madagascan Jacana (Actophilornis albinucha)
Madagascan Lark (Mirafra hova)
Madagascan Magpie-Robin (Copsychus albospecularis)
Madagascan Mannikin (Lemuresthes nana)
Madagascan Nightjar (Caprimulgus madagascariensis)
Madagascan Owl (Asio madagascariensis)
Madagascan Partridge (Margaroperdix madagarensis)
Madagascan Plover (Charadrius thoracicus)
Madagascan Pochard (Aythya innotata)
Madagascan Pratincole (Glareola ocularis)
Madagascan Pygmy Kingfisher (Corythornis madagascariensis)
Madagascan Rail (Rallus madagascariensis)
Madagascan Sandgrouse (Pterocles personatus)
Madagascan Serpent Eagle (Eutriorchis astur)
Madagascan Snipe (Gallinago macrodactyla)
Madagascan Sparrowhawk (Accipiter madagascariensis)
Madagascan Spinetail (Zoonavena grandidieri)
Madagascan Starling (Hartlaubius auratus)
Madagascan Stonechat (Saxicola sibilla)
Madagascan Swamp Warbler (Acrocephalus newtoni)
Madagascan Wagtail (Motacilla flaviventris)
Madagascan Wood Rail (Canirallus kioloides)
Madagascan Yellowbrow (Crossleyia xanthophrys)

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There are other changes and they can be seen at the I.O.C. World Bird List Website:

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Construction Zone!

Not Me!

Not Me!

I am doing some maintenance on the blog and you may encounter a broken link or page. Please leave a comment on this page and I will get my saw and hammer right on it. Thanks, Lee

Working On It

Working On It


Update 5/3/09:
My illness continues as this is my 4th day in the hospital. I have been fighting a severe case of bronchitis. It has not turned in to pneumonia, praise the Lord, and was told today that tomorrow I will get out, if nothing else acts up. Just found out they have Internet here, so here is this update. Thanks for all your prayers, they are helping. Was told this may drag on for some time yet. “It has to run it’s course.”

Update 4/25/09:
Here is a post I just placed on my Lee’s Creation Adventures Plus. This will help explain some of the construction going on.

“While I am fighting my latest illness, with prayer and much thought, I have decided to move the content of this site to Lee’s Birdwatching Adventures Plus. I originally started this site as an overflow of material I gleaned while researching articles. Time and energy will best be spent on just maintaining my main site.

Since I have the PLUS in the name, that was originally intended to be the place for the overflow material. I am reworking that site and now have a “PLUS index” which is where you will find these articles. Please check the main blog and I hope you will make it a regular place to visit.

Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths. (Proverbs 3:5-6 KJV)