Lee’s Seven Word Sunday – 7/9/17

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Lesser Double-collared Sunbird enjoying a Kniphofia flower ©©Rambling Ocean-Boeta.

THE LORD’S NAME

IS TO BE PRAISED

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“From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same the LORD’S name is to be praised.” (Psalms 113:3 KJV)

Lesser Double-collared Sunbird enjoying a Kniphofia flower ©©Rambling Ocean-Boeta.

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More Daily Devotionals

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That Beautiful Sunbird

Lesser Double-collared Sunbird enjoying a Kniphofia flower ©©Rambling Ocean-Boeta.

Lesser Double-collared Sunbird enjoying a Kniphofia flower ©©Rambling Ocean-Boeta.

Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Who hath ears to hear, let him hear. (Matthew 13:43 KJV)

In the daily devotional yesterday, I forgot to give you a link to my friend’s website. They gave me permission to use it, but I forgot to give him credit for his beautiful photography.

I have fixed my over-site by providing the link. Our Rumbling Ocean is a site I have been following for some time and have become friends with them. They have a son who is featured very often. We have all been watching him grow up. They live on the East Coast of South Africa and are within 150 m of the ocean. Check out their blogs at:

Our Rumbling Ocean  and Having Fun With My Camera

Here are links to the four pictures of the sunbird and the Kniphofia flower:

Now, let me tell you a little bit about that beautiful bird that the Lord created. The scientific name is Cinnyris chalybeus, and as is common, they have several names given to a bird. Locally, there in South Africa, it is known as the Lesser Double-collared Sunbird. The I.O.C. uses the name,  Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus).

Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) ©WikiC

Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) ©WikiC

“The southern double-collared sunbird or lesser double-collared sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) is a small passerine bird which breeds in southern South Africa. It is mainly resident, but partially migratory in the north-east of its range.” This Sunbird is part of the Nectariniidae – Sunbirds Family. This family was featured in the Sunday Inspiration – Sunbirds in August.

“This sunbird is common in gardens, fynbos, forests and coastal scrub. The southern double-collared sunbird breeds from April to December, depending on region. The closed oval nest is constructed from grass, lichen and other plant material, bound together with spider webs. It has a side entrance which sometimes has a porch, and is lined with wool, plant down and feathers.”

outhern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) ©WikiC

outhern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) ©WikiC

“The southern double-collared sunbird is 12 cm long. The adult male has a glossy, metallic green head, throat upper breast and back. It has a brilliant red band across the chest, separated from the green breast by a narrow metallic blue band. The rest of the underparts are whitish. When displaying, yellow feather tufts can be seen on the shoulders. As with other sunbirds the bill is long and decurved. The bill, legs and feet are black. The eye is dark brown. The male can be distinguished from the similar greater double-collared sunbird by its smaller size, narrower red chest band and shorter bill.

Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) Female ©WikiC

Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) Female ©WikiC

The female southern double-collared sunbird has brown upperparts and yellowish-grey underparts. The juvenile resembles the female. The female is greyer below than the female orange-breasted sunbird, and darker below than the female dusky sunbird.”

Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) ©©Redwood

Southern Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris chalybeus) ©©Redwood

“The southern double-collared sunbird is usually seen singly or in small groups. Its flight is fast and direct on short wings. It lives mainly on nectar from flowers, but takes some fruit, and, especially when feeding young, insects and spiders. It can take nectar by hovering like a hummingbird, but usually perches to feed most of the time.

The call is a hard chee-chee, and the song is high-pitched jumble of tinkling notes, rising and falling in pitch and tempo for 3–5 seconds or more.” (Quoted material is from Wikipedia with editing.) I also think Rambling Oceans photos are better, but I had only asked permission for the one. :(

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Our Rumbling Ocean

Having Fun With My Camera

Sunday Inspiration – Sunbirds

Southern Double-collared Sunbird – Wikipedia

Who Paints The Leaves?

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