Chats and Old World Flycatchers III

White-tailed Robin (Myiomela leucura) ©WikiC

White-tailed Robin (Myiomela leucura) ©WikiC

This third part of the Muscicapidae – Chats, Old World Flycatchers family starts with the White-tailed Robin (Myiomela leucura). What an amazing group of avian wonders from Our Lord, their Creator.

Part I and Part II of the Sunday Inspiration covered over half of the 321 member Chat and Old World Flycatcher family. This week, we should be able to finish up. Meagan Fee came back for the Christmas break (she was our summer intern at Faith) and played a fantastic violin piece for our offering last Sunday. It is fantastic and long enough, I hope, to cover the slideshow. :0)

Back to the flycatchers. The Genera covered this week are the Myiomela, Tarsiger, Enicurus, Myophonus, Cinclidium, Ficedula, Muscicapella, Phoenicurus, Monticola, Saxicola, Campicoloides, Emarginata, Pinarochroa, Thamnolaea, Myrmecocichla, Oenanthe, Pinarornis, Namibornis and Humblotia.

Old World flycatchers live in almost every environment with a suitable supply of trees, from dense forest to open scrub, and even the montane woodland of the Himalayas. The more northerly species migrate south in winter, ensuring a continuous diet of insects.

Malabar Whistling Thrush (Myophonus horsfieldii) by Nikhil Devasar

Malabar Whistling Thrush (Myophonus horsfieldii) by Nikhil Devasar

“I will whistle for them to gather them together, For I have redeemed them; And they will be as numerous as they were before. (Zechariah 10:8 NASB)

Whistling thrushes are mostly seen in hilly areas except during winter when they may descend to streams near the plains. They specialize in feeding on snails and their strong hooked bills are used to deal with them. They may choose a particular rock on which they crack the shells.

The whistling of a Malabar Whistling Thrush from xeno-canto by David Farrow.

Blue-fronted Robin (Cinclidium frontale) ©WikiC

Blue-fronted Robin (Cinclidium frontale) ©WikiC

The Blue-fronted Robin (Cinclidium frontale) is a species of bird in the family Muscicapidae. It is the only species in the monotypic genus Cinclidium. It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, and possibly Nepal. Its natural habitat is temperate forests.

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) Breeding male ©WikiC

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) Breeding male ©WikiC

The Wheatears, Oenanthe, have characteristic black and white or red and white markings on their rumps or their long tails. Most species are strongly sexually dimorphic; only the male has the striking plumage patterns characteristic of the genus, though the females share the white or red rump patches.

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Like a crane or a swallow, so did I chatter: I did mourn as a dove: mine eyes fail with looking upward: O LORD, I am oppressed; undertake for me. (Isaiah 38:14 KJV)

“O Come, O Come Emmanuel”  by Meagan Fee on Violin and Jill Foster accompanying

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Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers I
Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers II
Muscicapidae – Chats, Old World Flycatchers

Gideon

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Sunday Inspiration – Bulbuls

White-eared (Cheeked) Bulbul (Pycnonotus leucotis) at Zoo Miami by Lee

White-eared (Cheeked) Bulbul (Pycnonotus leucotis) at Zoo Miami by Lee

 Then the trees of the forest will sing for joy before the LORD; For He is coming to judge the earth. O give thanks to the LORD, for He is good; For His lovingkindness is everlasting. (1 Chronicles 16:33-34 NASB)

Bulbuls are a family, Pycnonotidae, of medium-sized passerine songbirds. Many forest species are known as greenbuls, brownbuls, leafloves, bristlebills, finchbills and  a Malia. The family is distributed across most of Africa and into the Middle East, tropical Asia to Indonesia, and north as far as Japan. A few insular species occur on the tropical islands of the Indian Ocean There are 151 species in around 28 genera. While some species are found in most habitats, overall African species are predominantly found in rainforest whilst rainforest species are rare in Asia, instead preferring more open areas.

Collared Finchbill by Dan at Zoo Miami

Bulbuls are short-necked slender passerines. The tails are long and the wings short and rounded. In almost all species the bill is slightly elongated and slightly hooked at the end. They vary in length from 13 cm for the tiny greenbul to 29 cm in the straw-headed bulbul. Overall the sexes are alike, although the females tend to be slightly smaller. In a few species the differences are so great that they have been described as functionally different species. The soft plumage of some species is colourful with yellow, red or orange vents, cheeks, throat or supercilia, but most are drab, with uniform olive-brown to black plumage. Species with dull coloured eyes often sport contrasting eyerings. Some have very distinct crests. Bulbuls are highly vocal, with the calls of most species being described as nasal or gravelly. One author described the song of the brown-eared bulbul as “the most unattractive noises made by any bird”

Let the field be joyful, and all that is therein: then shall all the trees of the wood rejoice (Psalms 96:12 KJV)

Maybe in the case of that brown-eared bulbul, this verse would be more appropriate:

Make a joyful noise unto the LORD, all the earth: make a loud noise, and rejoice, and sing praise. (Psalms 98:4 KJV)

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“How Deep The Father’s Love For Us” ~ played by Megan Fee and Jill Foster

How deep the Father’s love for us
How vast beyond all measure
That He should give His only Son
To make a wretch His treasure

How great the pain of searing loss
The Father turns His face away
As wounds which mar the Chosen One
Bring many sons to glory

Behold the man upon a cross
My sin upon His shoulders
Ashamed, I hear my mocking voice
Call out among the scoffers

It was my sin that held Him there
Until it was accomplished
His dying breath has brought me life
I know that it is finished

I will not boast in anything
No gifts, no power, no wisdom
But I will boast in Jesus Christ
His death and resurrection

Why should I gain from His reward?
I cannot give an answer
But this I know with all my heart
His wounds have paid my ransom

Why should I gain from His reward?
I cannot give an answer
But this I know with all my heart
His wounds have paid my ransom

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. (John 3:16 KJV)

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More Sunday Inspirations

Pycnonotidae – Bulbuls Family

Bulbul – Wikipedia

Falling Plates

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