Chats and Old World Flycatchers III

White-tailed Robin (Myiomela leucura) ©WikiC

White-tailed Robin (Myiomela leucura) ©WikiC

This third part of the Muscicapidae – Chats, Old World Flycatchers family starts with the White-tailed Robin (Myiomela leucura). What an amazing group of avian wonders from Our Lord, their Creator.

Part I and Part II of the Sunday Inspiration covered over half of the 321 member Chat and Old World Flycatcher family. This week, we should be able to finish up. Meagan Fee came back for the Christmas break (she was our summer intern at Faith) and played a fantastic violin piece for our offering last Sunday. It is fantastic and long enough, I hope, to cover the slideshow. :0)

Back to the flycatchers. The Genera covered this week are the Myiomela, Tarsiger, Enicurus, Myophonus, Cinclidium, Ficedula, Muscicapella, Phoenicurus, Monticola, Saxicola, Campicoloides, Emarginata, Pinarochroa, Thamnolaea, Myrmecocichla, Oenanthe, Pinarornis, Namibornis and Humblotia.

Old World flycatchers live in almost every environment with a suitable supply of trees, from dense forest to open scrub, and even the montane woodland of the Himalayas. The more northerly species migrate south in winter, ensuring a continuous diet of insects.

Malabar Whistling Thrush (Myophonus horsfieldii) by Nikhil Devasar

Malabar Whistling Thrush (Myophonus horsfieldii) by Nikhil Devasar

“I will whistle for them to gather them together, For I have redeemed them; And they will be as numerous as they were before. (Zechariah 10:8 NASB)

Whistling thrushes are mostly seen in hilly areas except during winter when they may descend to streams near the plains. They specialize in feeding on snails and their strong hooked bills are used to deal with them. They may choose a particular rock on which they crack the shells.

The whistling of a Malabar Whistling Thrush from xeno-canto by David Farrow.

Blue-fronted Robin (Cinclidium frontale) ©WikiC

Blue-fronted Robin (Cinclidium frontale) ©WikiC

The Blue-fronted Robin (Cinclidium frontale) is a species of bird in the family Muscicapidae. It is the only species in the monotypic genus Cinclidium. It is found in Bhutan, China, India, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, and possibly Nepal. Its natural habitat is temperate forests.

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) Breeding male ©WikiC

Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) Breeding male ©WikiC

The Wheatears, Oenanthe, have characteristic black and white or red and white markings on their rumps or their long tails. Most species are strongly sexually dimorphic; only the male has the striking plumage patterns characteristic of the genus, though the females share the white or red rump patches.

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Like a crane or a swallow, so did I chatter: I did mourn as a dove: mine eyes fail with looking upward: O LORD, I am oppressed; undertake for me. (Isaiah 38:14 KJV)

“O Come, O Come Emmanuel”  by Meagan Fee on Violin and Jill Foster accompanying

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Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers I
Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers II
Muscicapidae – Chats, Old World Flycatchers

Gideon

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Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers II

Rufous-bellied Niltava (Niltava sundara) by Nikhil Devasar

Rufous-bellied Niltava (Niltava sundara) by Nikhil Devasar

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the sky, and brought them to the man to see what he would call them; and whatever the man called a living creature, that was its name. (Genesis 2:19 NASB)

Last week’s Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers covered the first part of the Muscicapidae Family. This week, we will show the some more of the Family. There are 321 Members that make up the Muscicapidae Family. What great looking birds from their Creator.

Blue-and-white Flycatcher (Cyanoptila cyanomelana) ©WikiC

Blue-and-white Flycatcher (Cyanoptila cyanomelana) ©WikiC

Chats (formerly sometimes known as “chat-thrushes”) are a group of small Old World insectivorous birds formerly classified as members of the thrush family Turdidae, but now are considered Old World flycatchers. The name is normally applied to the more robust ground-feeding flycatchers found in Europe and Asia and most northern species are strong migrants.

The Old World flycatchers, the Muscicapidae, are small passerine birds mostly restricted to the Old World (Europe, Africa and Asia). These are mainly small arboreal insectivores, many of which, as the name implies, take their prey on the wing.

White-starred Robin (Pogonocichla stellata) WikiC

White-starred Robin (Pogonocichla stellata) ©WikiC

The appearance of these birds is very varied, but they mostly have weak songs and harsh calls. They are small to medium birds, ranging from 9 to 22 cm in length. Many species are dull brown in colour, but the plumage of some can be much brighter, especially in the males. Most have broad, flattened bills suited to catching insects in flight, although the few ground-foraging species typically have finer bills.

Old World flycatchers live in almost every environment with a suitable supply of trees, from dense forest to open scrub, and even the montane woodland of the Himalayas. The more northerly species migrate south in winter, ensuring a continuous diet of insects.

Depending on the species, their nests are either well-constructed cups placed in a tree or cliff ledge, or simply lining in a pre-existing tree hole. The hole-nesting species tend to lay larger clutches, with an average of eight eggs, rather than just two to five.

White-browed Robin-Chat (Cossypha heuglini) by Daves BirdingPix

White-browed Robin-Chat (Cossypha heuglini) by Daves BirdingPix

Because this Muscicapidae family is so large, this week’s Sunday Inspiration and last week’s were divided. The reason for this is so the slideshow will not be too long. This divides them in taxonomic order in to several groups. I was going to divide this family in half, but there are so many photos available that I would have to find a symphony to provide enough music to show them all at once. ☺♪♫☺

Last week, the first 97-98 members were shown from these genera: Alethe, Cercotrichas, Copsychus, Fraseria, Myioparus, Melaenornis, Empidornis, Muscicapa, Anthipes, Cyornis.

This Slideshow of Muscicapidae in taxonomic order – Second Part (includes the genera- Niltava, Cyanoptila, Eumyias, Erithacus, Pseudalethe, Cossyphicula, Cossypha, Swynnertonia, Pogonocichla, Stiphrornis, Sheppardia, Cichladusa, Heinrichia, Leonardina, Heteroxenicus, Brachypteryx , Vauriella, Larvivora, Luscinia, Irania and Calliope.) 75 Species

Start with Niltava 

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Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men. And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross. Therefore God also has highly exalted Him and given Him the name which is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those in heaven, and of those on earth, and of those under the earth, and that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father. (Philippians 2:5-11 NKJV)

“The Birthday of a King” ~ by Dr. Richard Gregory, now in Glory.

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Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers I

More Sunday Inspirations

Muscicapidae – Chats and Old World Flycatchers

Faith Baptist Church

Gospel Presentation

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Sunday Inspiration – Chats and Old World Flycatchers I

Bearded Scrub Robin (Cercotrichas quadrivirgata) ©WikiC

Bearded Scrub Robin (Cercotrichas quadrivirgata) ©WikiC

In all labor there is profit, But idle chatter leads only to poverty. (Proverbs 14:23 NKJV)

The Old World flycatchers are a large family (321 Members), the Muscicapidae, of small passerine birds mostly restricted to the Old World (Europe, Africa and Asia). These are mainly small arboreal insectivores, many of which, as the name implies, take their prey on the wing.

The appearance of these birds is very varied, but they mostly have weak songs and harsh calls. They are small to medium birds, ranging from 9 to 22 cm in length. Many species are dull brown in color, but the plumage of some can be much brighter, especially in the males. Most have broad, flattened bills suited to catching insects in flight, although the few ground-foraging species typically have finer bills.

Old World flycatchers live in almost every environment with a suitable supply of trees, from dense forest to open scrub, and even the montane woodland of the Himalayas. The more northerly species migrate south in winter, ensuring a continuous diet of insects.
Depending on the species, their nests are either well-constructed cups placed in a tree or cliff ledge, or simply lining in a pre-existing tree hole. The hole-nesting species tend to lay larger clutches, with an average of eight eggs, rather than just two to five.

Ferruginous Flycatcher (Muscicapa ferruginea) by MAMuin

Ferruginous Flycatcher (Muscicapa ferruginea) by MAMuin

“For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, “HE CATCHES THE WISE IN THEIR OWN CRAFTINESS”; (1 Corinthians 3:19 NKJV)

Because this Muscicapidae family is so large, this Sunday Inspiration and next week’s will be divided. The reason for this is so the slideshow is not too long. This will divide them in taxonomic order about half way.

Slideshow of Muscicapidae in taxonomic order – First Half

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Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him. (Matthew 2:1-2 KJV)

“Wise Men Still Seek Him” – Trio and Choir

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“Heaven’s Announcement” – message by Pastor Osborne last Sunday. About the birth of Christ.

Shepherd ©Flickr

Shepherd ©Flickr

More Sunday Inspirations

Muscicapidae – Chats and Old World Flycatchers

Faith Baptist Church

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White-rumped Shama at Zoo Miami

White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus)  at Zoo Miami - Lee

White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus) at Zoo Miami – Lee

Even the stork in the sky Knows her seasons; And the turtledove and the swift and the thrush Observe the time of their migration; But My people do not know The ordinance of the LORD. (Jeremiah 8:7 NASB)

The White-rumped Shama (Copsychus malabaricus) is a small passerine bird of the family Muscicapidae. Native to densely vegetated habitats in the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia, its popularity as a cage-bird and songster has led to it being introduced elsewhere.

It was formerly classified as a member of the thrush family, Turdidae, causing it to be commonly known as the White-rumped Shama Thrush or simply Shama Thrush.

They typically weigh between 28 and 34 g (1.0 and 1.2 oz) and are around 23–28 cm (9–11 in) in length. Males are glossy black with a chestnut belly and white feathers on the rump and outer tail. Females are more greyish-brown, and are typically shorter than males. Both sexes have a black bill and pink feet. Juveniles have a greyish-brown colouration, similar to that of the females, with a blotchy or spotted chest.

The voice of this species is rich and melodious which made them popular as cage birds in South Asia with the tradition continuing in parts of Southeast Asia. It is loud and clear, with a variety of phrases, and often mimics other birds. They also make a ‘Tck’ call in alarm or when foraging. One of the first recordings of a bird song that was ever made was of this species. This recording was made in 1889 from a captive individual using an Edison wax cylinder by Ludwig Koch in Germany. (Wikipedia)

Here is a video of the Shama singing the second day we were at the Wings of Asia aviary at the Zoo. The pair have a nest and I think the chicks have hatched. (Senior moment-I don’t remember what they told me.)

The LORD is my strength and my shield; my heart trusted in him, and I am helped: therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth; and with my song will I praise him. (Psalms 28:7 KJV)

I am kicking up dust again behind the scenes. The new IOC 4.2 list came out while we were at the zoo. So far I have 237 pages updated, all but the Lark family. They added a new family and are scrambling the Larks around. I am now preparing to do the indexes.  The new 4.2 count is 10,530 species in the world. Stay tuned.

Birds of the World – Families – done

Birds of the Bible – Thrush

White-rumped Shama – Wikipedia

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