Sunday Inspiration – Procellariidae – (Pterodroma – Gadfly) Petrels

Providence Petrel (Pterodroma solandri) by Ian

“Praise the LORD from the earth, ye dragons, and all deeps: Fire, and hail; snow, and vapour; stormy wind fulfilling his word: Mountains, and all hills; fruitful trees, and all cedars: Beasts, and all cattle; creeping things, and flying fowl:” (Psalms 148:7-10 KJV)

The Petrels in the Pterodroma genus has enough species to present them in their own post. Ian Montgomery, (Bird of the Week/Moment), has quite a few photos of this family on his Birdway Site.

Murphy’s Petrel (Pterodroma ultima) ©WikiC

“The gadfly petrels are seabirds in the bird order Procellariiformes. The gadfly petrels are named for their speedy weaving flight as if evading horseflies. The flight action is also reflected in the genus name Pterodroma, from Ancient Greek pteron, “wing” and dromos, “runner”.

Cook’s Petrel (Pterodroma cookii) ©WikiC

“These medium to large petrels feed on food items picked from the ocean surface.”

Great-winged Petrel (Pterodroma macroptera) by Ian

“The short, sturdy bills of the Pterodroma species in this group, about 35 altogether, are adapted for soft prey taken at the surface; they have twisted intestines for digesting marine animals which have unusual biochemistries.”

White-headed Petrel (Pterodroma lessonii) by Ian

“Their complex wing and face marking are probably for interspecific recognition.”

Soft-plumaged Petrel (Pterodroma mollis) ©WikiC

“These birds nest in colonies on islands and are pelagic when not breeding. One white egg is laid usually in a burrow or on open ground. They are nocturnal at the breeding colonies.”

“While generally wide-ranging, most Pterodroma species are confined to a single ocean basin (e.g. Atlantic), and vagrancy is not as common amongst Pterodromas as it is in some other seabird species (c.f. the Storm-Petrels Hydrobatidae).” (Information from Wikipedia)

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“Praise ye the LORD. Praise God in his sanctuary: praise him in the firmament of his power. Praise him for his mighty acts: praise him according to his excellent greatness. Praise him with the sound of the trumpet: praise him with the psaltery and harp. Praise him with the timbrel and dance: praise him with stringed instruments and organs. Praise him upon the loud cymbals: praise him upon the high sounding cymbals. Let every thing that hath breath praise the LORD. Praise ye the LORD.” (Psalms 150:1-6 KJV)


“Jesus What a Mighty Name” ~ Pastor Smith with Choir and Orchestra.
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More Sunday Inspirations

Procellariidae – Petrels, Shearwaters

Sunday Inspiration – Procellariidae Family – Petrel, Fulmar and Prion

Pastor Jerry Smith – Testimony
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Sunday Inspiration – Wagtails and Pipits

Rosy Pipit (Anthus roseatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Rosy Pipit (Anthus roseatus) by Nikhil Devasar

“He hath made his wonderful works to be remembered: the LORD is gracious and full of compassion.” (Psalms 111:4 KJV)

The Motacillidae are a family of small passerine birds with medium to long tails. There are around 66 species in 6 genera and they include the wagtails, longclaws and pipits. The longclaws are entirely restricted to the Afrotropics, and the wagtails are predominantly found in Europe, Africa and Asia, with two species migrating and breeding in Alaska. The pipits have the most cosmopolitan distribution, being found across mostly in the Old World but occurring also in the Americas and oceanic islands such as New Zealand and the Falklands. Two African species, the Yellow-breasted Pipit and Sharpe’s Longclaw are sometimes placed in a separate seventh genus, Hemimacronyx, which is closely related to the longclaws.

Yellow-throated Longclaw (Macronyx croceus) ©WikiC

Yellow-throated Longclaw (Macronyx croceus) ©WikiC

Wagtails, pipits, and longclaws are slender, small to medium sized passerines, ranging from 14 to 17 centimetres in length, with short necks and long tails. They have long, pale legs with long toes and claws, particularly the hind toe which can be up to 4 cm in length in some longclaws. Overall the robust longclaws are larger than the pipits and wagtails. Longclaws can weigh as much as 64 g, whereas the weight range for pipits and wagtails is 15–31 g. The plumage of most pipits is dull brown and reminiscent of the larks, although some species have brighter plumages, particularly the Golden Pipit of north-east Africa. The adult male longclaws have brightly coloured undersides.

Citrine Wagtail (Motacilla citreola) by Nikhil Devasar

Citrine Wagtail (Motacilla citreola) by Nikhil Devasar

The wagtails often have striking plumage, including grey, black, white, and yellow. (Wikipedia with editing)
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“And they that passed by reviled him, wagging their heads, And saying, Thou that destroyest the temple, and buildest it in three days, save thyself. If thou be the Son of God, come down from the cross.” (Matthew 27:39-40 KJV)

“Glorious Love” ~ Choir, Orchestra, Solo by Pastor Jerry

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More Sunday Inspirations

Motacillidae – Wagtails, Pipits Family

Sharing The Gospel

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