Salmon-crested (Moluccan) Cockatoo at Parrot Mountain

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

“So God created … every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.” (Genesis 1:21 NKJV)

Here are a few photos of the Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) or Mouccan Cockatoo, as they call it, at the Parrot Mountain in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. On their brochure they have “In the Beginning GOD Created All Things” and “Hundreds of Tropical Birds in a Garden of Eden Surrounding.” It is a very enjoyable place to visit. The landscaping is very pretty and colorful. More about that in another post. It is very much Christian oriented.

“The salmon-crested cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) also known as the Moluccan cockatoo, is a cockatoo endemic to the south Moluccas in eastern Indonesia. They are members of the Cacatuidae – Cockatoos Family. At a height of up to 46–52 cm and weight of up to 850 g, it is among the largest of the white cockatoos. The female is larger than the male on average. It has white-pink feathers with a definite peachy glow, a slight yellow on the underwing and underside of the tail feathers and a large retractable recumbent crest which it raises when threatened, revealing hitherto concealed bright red-orange plumes to frighten potential attackers. It may also be raised in excitement or in other ’emotional’ displays. Some describe the crest as “flamingo-colored.” It also has one of the louder calls in the parrot world and in captivity is a capable mimic.

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

In the wild the salmon-crested cockatoo inhabits lowland forests below 1000 m. The diet consists mainly of seeds, nuts and fruit, as well as coconuts, and also eats Meat. There is additional evidence that they eat insects off the ground, and pet Moluccan cockatoos have tested positive for anemia if their diet does not include enough protein.

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Le

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

For every kind of beast and bird, of reptile and creature of the sea, is tamed and has been tamed by mankind. (James 3:7 NKJV)

The salmon-crested cockatoo can no longer be imported into the United States because it is listed on the Wild Bird Conservation Act. However, they are being bred in captivity. They are popular for their beauty and trainability (which makes them popular in trained bird shows). The salmon-crested cockatoo is widely considered to be one of the most demanding parrots to keep as a pet due to their high intelligence, large size, potential noise level, and need to chew. Moluccan cockatoos require a very large and very sturdy cage or aviary. Salmon-crested cockatoos are highly social and pets can be extremely cuddly, affectionate, and gentle birds.” (Wikipedia)

The photos are shown in the sequence taken. Dan was enjoying scratching its head.

*

Parrot Mountain in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo – Wikipedia

Cacatuidae – Cockatoos Family

Wordless Birds

*

Cincinnati Zoo III

Major Mitchell's Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) at Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13

Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

I know and am acquainted with all the birds of the mountains, and the wild animals of the field are Mine and are with Me, in My mind. (Psalms 50:11 AMP)

Here are more members of the Psittaciformes Order of Parrots and Cockatoos we saw during our trip to the Cincinnati Zoo in Ohio.

They were in various areas of the Zoo. The Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo was outside enjoying himself or herself, whichever it was. The perch was in a nicely landscaped area near the entrance/exit, depending on which way you went through the zoo. For us, it was the last member of its family we saw.

Major Mitchell's Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) at Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13

Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) by Lee

These beautiful birds are from Australia and are on the decline. They look very similar to the Galah we photographed at the Brevard Zoo, but have a lighter pink color. Both are members of the Cacatuidae – Cockatoos Family and are closely related, even nesting in the same area. There has been on occasion where the two species have interbred and produced hybridised offspring.

Major Mitchell's Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) at Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13 by Dan

Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) by Dan

Their biggest difference is the crest that the Major Mitchell likes to pop up. Our bird didn’t show off, but Ian’s photo shows the crest raised.

Major Mitchell's Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) By Ian

Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo (Lophochroa leadbeateri) By Ian

In the Lorikeet Landing area, we encountered the Black-capped Lory (Lorius lory) who also lives near Australia in New Guinea. “It is a colorful and relatively robust lory (31 cm). There are seven subspecies, all with green wings, red heads and body around the wing, a black cap, grey-black cere, yellow underwings, and blue legs and belly. Most also have a blue nape and mantle (area between wings on the back). It remains overall widespread and common

*

Black-capped Lory (Lorius lory) Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13 by Lee

Black-capped Lory (Lorius lory) by Lee

The Black-capped Lory inhabits the primary forest and forest edges in most lowland areas up to 1000m (sporadically to 1750m), but not monsoon forest or coconut plantations. It is usually found in pairs and occasionally in groups of 10 or more. Their diet includes pollen, nectar, flowers, fruit and insects.

Black-capped Lory Sign

Black-capped Lory Sign

*

Black-capped Lory (Lorius lory) Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13 by Lee

Black-capped Lory (Lorius lory) by Lee

(Information for Wikipedia and other Internet sources)

See:

** PS – This is a little short, but I had surgery on my neck yesterday. (Removed a cancer cell.)