Eagles and Parrots Safe in Tennessee Fires

 Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

As the fire burneth a wood, and as the flame setteth the mountains on fire; (Psalms 83:14 KJV)

As you may recall, Dan and I visited the Parrot Mountain and Garden of Eden in Gatlinburg, Tennessee this summer. There have been devastating fires up in the mountains in that area due to severe drought conditions. Many places have been destroyed in the Gatlingburg surrounding area. Dollywood, who has quite a collection of Eagles and Parrot Mountain with their Parrots were to close for comfort, but the Lord has been good to them and their keepers.

 Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

“I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.” (Psalms 50:11 KJV)

Salmon-crested (Moluccan) Cockatoo at Parrot Mountain

Parrot Mountain’s Prayer Garden

Plantain-eater at Parrot Mountain

Parrot Mountain’s Origin and Mission

Here are some of the articles you might find interesting:

Dollywood’s eagles ‘safe and sound,’ as are Parrot Mountain birds

This is from their Facebook Account:

Parrot mountain was not affected by the fires! All the birds are safe and secure! God was watching over Parrot mountain. We pray for all those who were affected by the fires. Thank you all for your concerns ! We appreciate you all and love you guys. #PrayForGatlinburg

LIST: What’s damaged, destroyed and intact From 9 News

Tennessee Wildfires

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Parrot Mountain’s Origin and Mission

Origin of Parrot Mountain and Garden of Eden

Parrot Mountain is a result of a vision the owner had in July 1995. He left Mississippi with his family and came to the mountains of Tennessee and was led to the land that is called Parrot Mountain and Garden of Eden.

The vision was to build a garden landscaped with flowers, plants, birds and most importantly with scriptures from the word. The scriptures are planted throughout like seeds through the gardens to be a testimonial that there is a Great God who reigns eternal in the heavens and that all things are made were made by Him and without Him was not anything made that was made that is to say in the beginning God created all things. As you stroll through the gardens not the beautiful color of the birds and flowers how their colors give Him glory and we believe that we, as His creation, should give him glory.

And so seven years after moving to the mountains the gardens were opened on August 28, 2002.

Our Mission here at Parrot Mountain and Garden of Eden.

  1. Is to be a witness and declare His name that The Lord God is the Creator of the heavens and the earth. That all things were made by Him and without Him was not anything made that was made. For the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ.
  2. To provide a shelter for abused or neglected birds and a home for birds that need a place for whatever reason.
  3. For the propagation of endangered or threaten species. To increase the numbers so that they do not become extinct like the Passenger Pigeon and Carolina Parakeet once native to the United States. To educate the public about these magnificent creatures and keeping in harmony with the beauty and serenity of the mountains.

We were thoroughly blessed and enjoyed our time we spent at Parrot Mountain. I have already shared a couple of post with you about our visit. The Origin and Mission above was copied from a handout given when you enter. I trust they do not mind me recopying it here. Pictures were added by me. If you ever are up in the Pigeon Forge, Tennessee area, it will be well worth your effort to visit them.

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These pages from them have some nice photos:

Articles written here:

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Plantain-eater at Parrot Mountain

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

By them the birds of the heavens have their home; They sing among the branches. He waters the hills from His upper chambers; The earth is satisfied with the fruit of Your works. (Psalms 104:12-13 NKJV)

The western plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator), also known as the grey plantain-eater or western grey plantain-eater, is a large member of the Turaco family, a group of large arboreal near-passerine birds restricted to Africa.

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

This species is a resident breeder in open woodland habitats in tropical west Africa. It lays two or three eggs in a tree platform nest.

These are common, noisy and conspicuous birds, despite lacking the brilliant colours of relatives such as the violet turaco. They are 50 cm long, including a long tail. Their plumage is mainly grey above spotted with brown. The head, erectile crest, neck and breast are brown streaked with silver. The underparts are whitish, heavily streaked with brown.

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

Western plantain-eater has a thick bright yellow bill, and shows a white wing bar in flight. The sexes are identical, but immatures have a black woolly head without silver streaking.

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) at Parrot Mountain

This bird is similar to the closely related eastern plantain-eater. The latter species has white tail bars, and lacks the chest bars and dark wing feather shafts of its western relative. This species feeds on fruit, especially figs, seeds and other vegetable matter.

We first encountered this amazing bird created by the Creator at the Houston Zoo this past spring. Those were in an enclosure with the normal fences to try to photograph through. That is what made this visit to Parrot Mountain so special because we were in a free-flying aviary with them.

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) Houston Zoo

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) Houston Zoo by Lee

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) Houston Zoo

Western Plantain-eater (Crinifer piscator) Houston Zoo

Western plantain-eater has a loud cow-cow-cow call, very familiar in west Africa. (Info from Wikipedia)

Here is a video I took of the birds in the aviary feeding. The Plantain-eater comes in at tries to intimidate the Cardinal and then starts his call. If you watch him/her, you will notice it seems to be afraid of that cardboard dish holding the fruit. Hence my chuckle. I’ll tell you more about those other birds later.

“But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality and without hypocrisy. Now the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make peace.” (James 3:17-18 NKJV)

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Other Parrot Mountain Blogs

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Parrot Mountain’s Prayer Garden

And when he had sent the multitudes away, he went up into a mountain apart to pray: and when the evening was come, he was there alone. (Matthew 14:23 KJV)

The Prayer Garden at Parrot Mountain is very peaceful and lovely. Thought I would share some of those photos this time. At the entrance there are two angel statues and then as you enter.

Angel

Angel

There are three crosses and some signs with verses:

Parrot Mountain Landscape and Signs

Three Crosses and Signs

As you go in further there are more signs, a garden tomb with an angel and a place where the Savior was lain. More signs and walkway with sculptures in them. Here are more of the photos of this area of Parrot Mountain.

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Parrot Mountain in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee
Fellowship in the Smokies
Peaceful Stream
Salmon-crested (Moluccan) Cockatoo at Parrot Mountain
Are You Missing Something?
Sharing The Gospel

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Are You Missing Something?

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn

Wait on the LORD, And keep His way, And He shall exalt you to inherit the land; When the wicked are cut off, you shall see it. (Psalms 37:34 NKJV)

While at the Parrot Mountain last week, we saw this Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis). As one of my friend said, after seeing these photos, “that is an ugly bird.” Well, almost, but is beauty in the eye of the beholder? I am sure that from the eyes of another Silvery-cheeked Hornbill, it may not be.

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn

As the sign says,:

  • The Silvery-cheeked Hornbill can grow up to two and half feet long and weigh two and three quarter pounds.
  • Have an average life span of 50 years.
  • Silvery-cheeked Hornbills eat by plucking a piece of fruit and tipping its head back to swallow it whole. They will eat berries, figs, palmnuts, as well as a variety of insects.
  • The Hornbill is one of the few birds that have eyelashes to shield them from sun and dust.
Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn by Lee

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn by Lee

Also the Silvery-cheeked Hornbill are residents of the tall evergreen forest of east Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa.

Well, maybe this bird is a little ugly:

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill (Bycanistes brevis) Parrot Mtn

Yet, in the Lord’s sight, this bird was created special and most likely fits right in with where it lives and what it does. What I haven’t shown you yet is that it is missing the tip of its beak. Most likely, that is why it is in captivity because it may not be able to obtain food in the wild.

Missing the tip of its beak

Missing the tip of its beak

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill with missing tip of beak.

Silvery-cheeked Hornbill with missing tip of beak.

I was surprised by how many verses that mention the words “cut off.” There are 200 verses in the NKJV. Even the verse where Peter cut off the ear of the servant, but Jesus healed him by putting back on. Only the Creator could have done that. Many mention enemies or sinners being cut off. Also, not being cut off if you are righteous and one of His saints.

For the LORD loves justice, And does not forsake His saints; They are preserved forever, But the descendants of the wicked shall be cut off. The righteous shall inherit the land, And dwell in it forever. The mouth of the righteous speaks wisdom, And his tongue talks of justice. The law of his God is in his heart; None of his steps shall slide. The wicked watches the righteous, And seeks to slay him. The LORD will not leave him in his hand, Nor condemn him when he is judged. Wait on the LORD, And keep His way, And He shall exalt you to inherit the land; When the wicked are cut off, you shall see it. (Psalms 37:28-34 NKJV)

Missing heaven and not spending eternity with the Lord Jesus Christ would be a terrible tragedy. I trust you will not be cut off with the wicked and that you know the Lord as your personal Savior. Accepting the Lord Jesus was the best decision I ever made in my life.

The Gospel Message and Gospel Presentation both explain how to not be cut off or missing out on eternity in heaven.

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Salmon-crested (Moluccan) Cockatoo at Parrot Mountain

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

“So God created … every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good.” (Genesis 1:21 NKJV)

Here are a few photos of the Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) or Mouccan Cockatoo, as they call it, at the Parrot Mountain in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. On their brochure they have “In the Beginning GOD Created All Things” and “Hundreds of Tropical Birds in a Garden of Eden Surrounding.” It is a very enjoyable place to visit. The landscaping is very pretty and colorful. More about that in another post. It is very much Christian oriented.

“The salmon-crested cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) also known as the Moluccan cockatoo, is a cockatoo endemic to the south Moluccas in eastern Indonesia. They are members of the Cacatuidae – Cockatoos Family. At a height of up to 46–52 cm and weight of up to 850 g, it is among the largest of the white cockatoos. The female is larger than the male on average. It has white-pink feathers with a definite peachy glow, a slight yellow on the underwing and underside of the tail feathers and a large retractable recumbent crest which it raises when threatened, revealing hitherto concealed bright red-orange plumes to frighten potential attackers. It may also be raised in excitement or in other ’emotional’ displays. Some describe the crest as “flamingo-colored.” It also has one of the louder calls in the parrot world and in captivity is a capable mimic.

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

In the wild the salmon-crested cockatoo inhabits lowland forests below 1000 m. The diet consists mainly of seeds, nuts and fruit, as well as coconuts, and also eats Meat. There is additional evidence that they eat insects off the ground, and pet Moluccan cockatoos have tested positive for anemia if their diet does not include enough protein.

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Le

Salmon-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua moluccensis) at Parrot Mtn by Lee

For every kind of beast and bird, of reptile and creature of the sea, is tamed and has been tamed by mankind. (James 3:7 NKJV)

The salmon-crested cockatoo can no longer be imported into the United States because it is listed on the Wild Bird Conservation Act. However, they are being bred in captivity. They are popular for their beauty and trainability (which makes them popular in trained bird shows). The salmon-crested cockatoo is widely considered to be one of the most demanding parrots to keep as a pet due to their high intelligence, large size, potential noise level, and need to chew. Moluccan cockatoos require a very large and very sturdy cage or aviary. Salmon-crested cockatoos are highly social and pets can be extremely cuddly, affectionate, and gentle birds.” (Wikipedia)

The photos are shown in the sequence taken. Dan was enjoying scratching its head.

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Parrot Mountain in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee

Salmon-crested Cockatoo – Wikipedia

Cacatuidae – Cockatoos Family

Wordless Birds

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