Avian And Attributes – Cloud

Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium nubicola) ©WikiC

“And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh.” (Luke 21:27-28 KJV)

“And the cloud of the LORD was upon them by day, when they went out of the camp.” (Numbers 10:34 KJV)

Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? declare, if thou hast understanding.” When I made the cloud the garment thereof, and thick darkness a swaddlingband for it,” (Job 38:4, 9 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Cloud

Cloud
(1): (n.) A dark vein or spot on a lighter material, as in marble; hence, a blemish or defect; as, a cloud upon one’s reputation; a cloud on a title.
(2): (v. i.) To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; — often used with up.
(3): (n.) That which has a dark, lowering, or threatening aspect; that which temporarily overshadows, obscures, or depresses; as, a cloud of sorrow; a cloud of war; a cloud upon the intellect.
(6): (v. t.) To overspread or hide with a cloud or clouds; as, the sky is clouded.

“And the LORD went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way; and by night in a pillar of fire, to give them light; to go by day and night:” (Exodus 13:21 KJV)

(8): (n.) A collection of visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the upper atmosphere.
(9): (n.) A mass or volume of smoke, or flying dust, resembling vapor.
(10): (v. t.) To blacken; to sully; to stain; to tarnish; to damage; — esp. used of reputation or character.
(11): (n.) A great crowd or multitude; a vast collection.

“Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.” (Hebrews 12:1-2 KJV)


Cloud Birds – Cloud Cisticola, Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl, Cloud-forest Screech Owl

Cloud Cisticola (Cisticola textrix) ©WikiC

The Cloud Cisticola or tink-tink cisticola (Cisticola textrix) is a species of bird in the Cisticolidae – Cisticolas and allies Family. It is found in Angola, Lesotho, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, and Zambia, and its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry lowland grassland.

Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium nubicola) ©WikiC

The Cloud-forest Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium nubicola) is a short, muscular, small-sized species of owl found throughout the Andes of western Colombia and north-western Ecuador, being confined to cloud forests between 900–2000 m a.s.l. Below this altitudinal range the Central American pygmy owl (Glaucidium griseiceps) occurs; above the Andean pygmy owl (Glaucidium jardinii) occurs. It is in the Strigidae – Owls Family.

Its epithet nubicola means in Latin “cloud inhabiting”, because this species is restricted to very humid cloud forests.

Cloud-forest Screech-Owl (Megascops marshalli)©Neotropical Birds Online

The Cloud-forest Screech Owl (Megascops marshalli) is a species of owl in the Strigidae – Owls Family. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name start with “C”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Saffron Finch at the Cloud Forrest

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan (Cropped by Lee)

Saffron Finch – Male at Zoo Miami by Dan (Cropped by Lee)

“…covered with silver, and her (his) feathers with yellow gold.” (Psalms 68:13b KJV) (modified)

Dan and I took a ride down to Miami last week. A 200 mile ride. We stayed two nights before heading back home via Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida. We really have not been birdwatching too much lately, so this makes up for a very hot summer and health reasons. Monday and Tuesday we spent at Zoo Miami. On Monday, because we didn’t get there until 2 PM, we visited their Cloud Forrest and Amazon and Beyond Area. We spent all day Tuesday in the fantastic Wings of Asia Aviary. So, let the tales begin:

 Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) by Lee

Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) by Lee

I want to introduce you to the Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola). They are actually Tanagers from the Amazon Basin of South America. The Saffron Finch likes the open and semi-open lowlands and are widely distributed in “Columbia, northern Venezuela (where it is called “canario de tejado” or “roof canary”), western Ecuador, western Peru, eastern and southern Brazil (where it is called “canário da terra” or “native canary”), Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay, northern Argentina, and Trinidad and Tobago. It has also been introduced to Hawaii, Puerto Rico and elsewhere.”

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

“Although commonly regarded as a canary, it is not related to the Atlantic canary. Formerly, it was placed in the Emberizidae but it is close to the seedeaters. The male is bright yellow with an orange crown which distinguishes it from most other yellow finches (the exception being the orange-fronted yellow finch). The females are more confusing and are usually just a slightly duller version of the male, but in the southern subspecies S. f. pelzelni they are olive-brown with heavy dark streaks.”

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

Saffron Finch Zoo Miami by Dan

“Typically nesting in cavities, the saffron finch makes use of sites such as abandoned rufous hornero (Furnarius rufus) nests, bamboo branches and under house roofs – this species is tolerant of human proximity, appearing at suburban areas and frequenting bird tables. They have a pleasant but repetitious song which, combined with their appearance, has led to them being kept as caged birds in many areas.” (quotes are from Wikipedia’s Saffron Finch)

Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) Female ©WikiC

Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola) Female ©WikiC

I didn’t see the female, if they had one, but thought you might like to see the difference between the male and the female.

Interesting Facts from WhatBird.com

  • Members of Thraupidae Family
  • They are about 6 inches in length.
  • The Saffron Finch is also known as the Yellow Finch and Pelzeln’s Finch.
  • It was first described by Carolus Linnaeus in 1766.
  • A group of finches has many collective nouns, including a “charm”, “company”, and “trembling” of finches.

Here is some video that I shot of this beauty. I tried to catch him in the trees and that is a challenge, as any birdwatcher knows. But then, to my surprise, he just decided that he needed a bath. Wow!

We have lots of photos from the trip, so stay tuned!

“Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.” (Psalms 51:7)

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Birdwatching Trips

Zoo Miami and the Wings of Asia FL

Thraupidae Family – Tanagers and Allies

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