Sunday Inspiration – Curassows

Wattled Curassow (Crax globulosa) by Lee at National Aviary

Wattled Curassow (Crax globulosa) by Lee at National Aviary

“Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.” (Hebrews 12:2 KJV)

Today we will finish up the Cracidae family by introducing you to the last 15 species. The are the Curassows in four genera. I love their curly hairdo on most of them. We see them in the different zoo quite frequently. “Curassows are one of the three major groups of cracid birds. Three of the four genera are restricted to tropical South America; a single species of Crax ranges north to Mexico.

Nocturnal Curassow (Nothocrax urumutum) ©WikiC

Nocturnal Curassow (Nothocrax urumutum) ©WikiC

The Nocturnal Curassow (Nothocrax urumutum) is the only one in his genus. They are found in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical swamps.

gal-crac-razor-billed-curassow-mitu-tuberosum-birdphotos-com

The next genus of Curassows are the Mitu, of which there are four. They are found in humid tropical forests in South America. Their plumage is iridescent black with a white or rufous crissum and tail-tip, and their legs and bills are red. The genders are alike. These are the Crestless, Alagoas, Salvin’s, and the Razor-billed Curassows.

Helmeted Curassow (Pauxi pauxi pauxi) Northern - Peggy ©WikiC Denveri Zoo

Helmeted Curassow (Pauxi pauxi pauxi) Northern – Peggy ©WikiC Denveri Zoo

The next Genus Pauxi – are called Helmeted Curassows. The Helmeted, Horned and Sira Curassows make up this group. They are  terrestrial black fowl with ornamental casque on their heads. All are found in South America.

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) ©WikiC

Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) ©WikiC

The last genus in this Cracidae Family are the Crax. Seven of them finish off with their curly hairdos. “Crax is a genus of curassows in the order Galliformes, a clade of large, heavy-bodied, ground-feeding birds. They are known from tropical South America with one species, the great curassow, ranging northwards through Central America as far as Mexico. The currasows in this genus are noted for their sexual dimorphism; males are more boldly coloured than females and have facial ornamentation such as knobs and wattles. They are also characterised by curly crests and contrastingly-coloured crissums.” (Most information from Wikipedia with editing)

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“For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God.” (1 Corinthians 1:18 KJV)

“Its About The Cross” ~ Quartet FBC

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More Sunday Inspirations

The Other Articles About the Cracidae Family:

Chachalacas, Curassows & Guans Family

Gospel Message

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Sunday Inspiration – Three Small Families

Yellow-Breasted Chat (Icteria virens) WikiC

Yellow-Breasted Chat (Icteria virens) WikiC

I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine. (Psalms 50:11 NKJV)

After all these months of doing the Sunday Inspirations that have featured the Passerformes Order of birds, we are getting near the end of the list. Known as Passerines or Song Birds, there has been 125 families to tell about and show their pictures. There are seven families left, of which, three of them are small in number, so they are being grouped together in this Sunday Inspiration.

First we have group of birds in an Incertae Sedis or Uncertain Family. “Incertae sedis (Latin for ‘of uncertain placement’) is a term used for a taxonomic group where its broader relationships are unknown or undefined.” (Wikipedia)  That means they don’t know into which families to place these birds.

The six birds in this family currently are the Green-tailed Warbler, Yellow-headed Warbler, Oriente Warbler, Wrenthrush, Yellow-breasted Chat, and the White-winged Warbler.

Wrenthrush (Zeledonia coronata) ©Drawing WikiC

Wrenthrush (Zeledonia coronata) ©Drawing WikiC

For instance the Wrenthrush (Zeledonia coronata) is neither a wren or a thrush (and unrelated to both). No copyright free photos are available to use other than this drawing. You can see a few photos here.

Bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) Cloud Forest by Lee

Bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) Cloud Forest by Lee

The Bananaquit belongs to the Coerebidae family. It is the only member, but there are numerous subspecies. I suspect one day they will split some of them off into separate species in the family. In fact they are suggesting three species already. We saw one down at Zoo Miami’s Cloud Forest.

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) by J Fenton

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) by J Fenton

Our last small family this week is the Calcariidae. There are six members here also. The four Longspurs; Mccown’s, Lapland, Smith’s and Chestnut-collared; and two Buntings, the Snow and McKay’s Bunting.

These are chunky ground-feeding birds with long wings which are usually seen in open areas. Males declare ownership of a territory by singing during short flights over it. The male’s breeding plumage is much brighter than his winter plumage. These birds gather in large flocks in winter. The longspurs are all found in North America; the Lapland Longspur, or Lapland Bunting, is also found in Europe and Asia. (Wikipedia)

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And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God.” (James 2:23 KJV)

“I’ll Be A Friend To Jesus” – Faith Baptist Quartet

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More Sunday Inspiration

Incertae Sedis – Uncertain – Wrenthrush and Chat Family

Calcariidae – Longspurs, Snow Buntings Family

Sharing The Gospel

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