Avian And Attributes – Pearl

Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) by Robert Scanlon

Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) by Robert Scanlon

“And the twelve gates were twelve pearls; every several gate was of one pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass. And I saw no temple therein: for the Lord God Almighty and the Lamb are the temple of it.” (Revelation 21:21-22 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Pearl

PEARL, n. perl.
1. A white, hard, smooth, shining body, usually roundish, found in a testaceous fish of the oyster kind. The pearl-shell is called matrix perlarum, mother of pearl, and the pearl is found only in the softer part of the animal. It is found in the Persian seas and in many parts of the ocean which washes the shores of Arabia and the continent and isles of Asia, and is taken by divers. Pearls are of different sizes and colors; the larger ones approach to the figure of a pear; some have been found more than an inch in length. They are valued according to their size, their roundness, and their luster or purity, which appears in a silvery brightness.
2. Poetically, something round and clear, as a drop of water or dew.
3. A white speck of film growing on the eye.
PEARL,v.t. perl. To set or adorn with pearls.
PEARL, v.i. perl. To resemble pearls.

“Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man, seeking goodly pearls: Who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it.” (Matthew 13:45-46 KJV)


Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) by Ian

Pearl Kite

The Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) is a very small raptor found in open savanna habitat adjacent to deciduous woodland. It is the only member of the genus Gampsonyx. The scientific name commemorates the English naturalist William Swainson.

The type specimen was collected from Brazil by English naturalist William Swainson, and described by Nicholas Aylward Vigors in 1825.  Vigors noted the similarity to both hawks and falcons, but placed Gampsonyx within the “Accipitrine subfamily” because it lacks the notched beak of the falcons. He also noted its striking resemblance to the coloration of the falconets.

Later, the pearl kite was classified with the falcons. For example, Peters placed it with the forest falcons in subfamily Polyhieracinae. In the mid-20th century it was found to be related to Elanus based on morphology and its molt schedule.

This tiny kite breeds from Panama, Colombia and Venezuela south to Bolivia and northern Argentina, with an isolated sedentary population in Nicaragua. It is expanding its range and was proved to breed on Trinidad in 1970. It was first reported in Costa Rica in the mid-1990s, and now is fairly common along Pacific slope, to 1000m.

Pearl Kite (Gampsonyx swainsonii) ©Flickr Fernando Flores

The pearl kite is 20.3–23 cm (8.0–9.1 in) in length and weighs 80–95 g (2.8–3.4 oz). It is the smallest raptor in the Americas and one of the two smallest accipitrids in the world (besides the little sparrowhawk). The tiny hawk, another neotropical species, attains a slightly higher weight than the pearl kite. The adult has a black crown, upperparts, wing and tail, a rufous edged white collar, yellow forehead and cheeks, mainly white underparts, and yellow legs. Immature birds are similar to the adults but have white and chestnut tips to the back and wing feathers, a buff collar and some buff on the white underparts. In flight this species looks mainly black above and white below. The northern form G. s. leonae differs from the nominate G. s. swainsonii in that it has rufous flanks.

The nest is a deep cup of sticks built high in a tree. The clutch is 2-4 brown-marked white eggs, incubated mainly by the female for 34–35 days to hatching, with a further 5 weeks to fledging. There may be two broods in a season.

The pearl kite feeds mainly on lizards, especially Anolis, but also takes small birds and insects; it usually sits on a high open perch from which it swoops on its prey. The call is a high musical pip-pip-pip-pip or kitty-kitty-kitty.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first name starts with “P”

What will you do with Jesus?

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Birds in Hymns – He The Pearly Gates Will Open

But after that the kindness and love of God our Savior toward man appeared, (Titus 3:4 KJV)

Writer:    Frederick A Blom 1867-1927

Musician: Elsie Ahlwen, 1905-

Love divine, so great and wondrous or

He The Pearly Gates Will Open

White-winged Dove by Reinier

White-winged Dove by Reinier

Love divine, so great and wondrous,
Deep and mighty, pure, sublime!
Coming from the heart of Jesus,
Just the same through tests of time.
Refrain

He the pearly gates will open,
So that I may enter in;
For He purchased my redemption
And forgave me all my sin.

Like a dove when hunted, frightened,,
As a wounded fawn was I;
Brokenhearted, yet He healed me,
He will heed the sinner’s cry.

Refrain

Sunset at Circle B  by TommyT

Sunset at Circle B by TommyT

Love divine, so great and wondrous,
All my sins He then forgave!
I will sing His praise forever,
For His blood, His power to save.

Refrain

In life’s eventide, at twilight,
At His door I’ll knock and wait;
By the precious love of Jesus
I shall enter Heaven’s gate.

Refrain


And the twelve gates were twelve pearls; every several gate was of one pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass.
(Rev 21:21 KJV)

Also known as: Love Divine

Hymn History of He The Pearly Gates Will Open
He The Pearly Gates Will Open – SermonAudio’s Online Hymnal
CyberHymnal

See ~ Wordless Birds

More ~ Birds in Hymns

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Birds of the Bible – Sparrows I

Sparrows are mentioned in at least seven verses in the Bible, but because of other applications associated with them, this is only Part I.

I am amazed at the articles that mention Sparrows as “Trash birds” or brushed off in articles about birds. Some examples:

“..he refers to common birds of no interest to him as ‘trash birds.’ With the possible exception of pigeons and House (English) Sparrows, there is no such thing as a trash bird” The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Birdwatching, p. 25.

“…until the problem species disperse.”

They can distract you from the less common birds, resulting in lost viewing opportunities – those other birds slip away while you’re trying to determine whether that brownish bird is “just” a song sparrow or something more exciting.

“…blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, and house sparrows. If you’re inundated by these less desirable birds, you may want stop offering corn.”

Anyone for a Sparrow Snack?

Anyone for a Sparrow Snack?

Click Picture to Enlarge
Can you believe this? A Sparrow Snack?

“The large North American (House Sparrow) population is descended from birds deliberately imported from Britain in the late 19th century. They were introduced independently in a number of American cities in the years between 1850 and 1875 as a means of pest control. The mistake was realized after they were well established and by 1883 they were already considered pests and their introduction a disaster.

While declining somewhat in their adopted homeland, House Sparrows are one of the most abundant birds in North America, with a population estimated at approximately 150 million. …In the United States and Canada, the House Sparrow is one of only three birds (the other two being the European Starling and the Rock Pigeon) not protected by law. As an invasive non-indigenous species, it is legal to kill House Sparrows and destroy their eggs at any time in most places in the United States. These three introduced species are now each more widespread and common on the continent than are any other birds.” (Wikipedia)
The sparrow is just trying to live and take care of it’s family.

Are not two sparrows sold for a copper coin? And not one of them falls to the ground apart from your Father’s will. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered Do not fear therefore; you are of more value than many sparrows. (Mat 10:29-31)

“Are not five sparrows sold for two copper coins? And not one of them is forgotten before God. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Do not fear therefore; you are of more value than many sparrows. (Luk 12:6-7)

“The next time that you see a sparrow, remember God is interested in that sparrow. An eloquent preacher said one time that there is never a sparrow dies but that God goes to its funeral. I am not that eloquent, so I don’t usually talk like that, but it impressed me—not a sparrow dies, but that God goes to its funeral.

God is interested in you. The next time you see a sparrow, remember God cares about you so much more than about that sparrow.
“Do not fear therefore; you are of more value than many sparrows.” (Birds of the Bible Study, Dr Joe Temple)
Birds of the Bible Study – Sparrow – Dr Joe Temple

Hymns:
He the pearly gates will open

Like a sparrow hunted, frightened,

American Tree Sparrow

American Tree Sparrow

Weak and helpless— such was I;
Wounded, fallen, yet He healed me—
He will heed the sinner’s cry.

Refrain:
He the pearly gates will open,
So that I may enter in;
For He purchased my redemption
And forgave me all my sin.

His eye is on the sparrow

Why should I feel discouraged?
Why should the shadows come?
Why should my heart feel lonely?
And long for heaven and home

When Jesus is my portion
A constant friend is He
His eye is on the sparrow
And I know He watches over me
His eye is on the sparrow and I know He watches me

I sing because I’m happy

Three Sparrows

Three Sparrows

I sing because I’m free
His eye is on the sparrow
And I know He watches me
His eye is on the sparrow
And I know He watches me

Interesting articles:
Wikipedia – His Eye is on the Sparrow
A Lighthouse-The Sparrow

See ~ Wordless Birds

More ~ Birds in Hymns

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