Sunday Inspiration – Waxbills and Allies II

Tricolored Parrotfinch (Erythrura tricolor) ©WikiC

Tricolored Parrotfinch (Erythrura tricolor) ©WikiC

Last Sunday the first half of the Waxbills and allies were shown. This week we will finish up the large family of 141 species. You will see birds with these names; Finch, Firetail, Parrotfinch, Silverbill, Mannikin, Munia, and Sparrows.

“Parrotfinches are small, colorful passerine birds belonging to the genus Erythrura in the family Estrildidae, the estrildid finches. They occur from South-east Asia to New Guinea, northern Australia and many Pacific Islands. They inhabit forest, bamboo thickets and grassland and some can be found in man-made habitats such as farmland, parks and gardens. Several species are commonly kept as cagebirds.

The plumage is usually mainly green. Most species have blue or red markings on the head and a red rump and tail. The tail is pointed and often fairly long. Seeds, especially those of grasses, comprise the bulk of the diet. Some parrotfinches also feed on fruit and small insects. Many species forage in flocks, keeping in contact with high-pitched calls.” (Wikipedia with editing)

Double-barred Finch (Taeniopygia bichenovii) ©Wiki

Lonchura is a genus of the estrildid finch family, and includes munias (or minias), mannikins, and silverbills. They are resident breeding birds in Africa and in South Asia from India and Sri Lanka east to Indonesia and the Philippines. The name mannikin is from Middle Dutch mannekijn ‘little man’ (also the source of the different bird name manakin).

They are small gregarious birds which feed mainly on seeds, usually in relatively open habitats, preferring to feed on the ground or on reeds of grasses. Several species have been noted to feed on algae such as Spirogyra.

The nest is a large domed grass structure into which four to ten white eggs are laid. Some species also build communal roosting nests for overnight rest.

The species in this genus are similar in size and structure, with stubby bills, stocky bodies and long tails. Most are 10–12 cm in length. Plumage is usually a combination of browns, black and white, with the sexes similar, but duller and less contrasted for immature birds.” (Wikipedia with editing)

Also, last week, some how I didn’t get Meagan’s song posted right and it didn’t play. It has been corrected now, but I am going to use it again because it is so well done.

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Jesus said to them, “If God were your Father, you would love Me, for I proceeded forth and came from God; nor have I come of Myself, but He sent Me. (John 8:42 NKJV)


“My Jesus I Love Thee” ~ by Meagan Fee at Faith Baptist

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Sunday Inspiration – Waxbill and Allies I

Sunday Inspiration

Estrildidae – Waxbills, Munias & Allies

Sharing The Gospel

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Sunday Inspiration – Waxbills and Allies I

Black-crowned Waxbill (Estrilda nonnula) ©WikiC

Black-crowned Waxbill (Estrilda nonnula) ©WikiC

The works of the LORD are great, sought out of all them that have pleasure therein. (Psalms 111:2 KJV)

This Sunday, the Lord has created some very beautiful birds after their kind. The Lord’s Creative Hand and Colors is very obvious. This is the Estrildidae Family which includes 141 species. Their names are numerous; they are the Antpecker, Nigrita, Oliveback, Pytillia, Finch, Twinspot, Crimsonwing, Seedcracker, Bluebill, Firefinch, Waxbill, Cordon-bleu, Grenadier, Avadavat and Quailfinch. I started to do them all, but there were too many photos. The last 70+ birds in the family will be in Part II.

The estrildid finches are small passerine birds of the Old World tropics and Australasia. They can be classified as the family Estrildidae (weaver-finch), or as a subfamily within the family Passeridae, which strictly defined comprises the Old World sparrows. Most are sensitive to cold and require warm, usually tropical, habitats, although a few have adapted to the cooler climates of southern Australia.

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu (Uraeginthus bengalus) ©WikiC

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu (Uraeginthus bengalus) ©WikiC

They are gregarious and often colonial seed-eaters with short, thick, but pointed bills. They are all similar in structure and habits, but vary widely in plumage colours and patterns.

All the estrildids build large, domed nests and lay 5–10 white eggs. Many species build roost nests. Some of the fire-finches and pytilias are hosts to the brood-parasitic indigobirds and whydahs, respectively.

Shelley's Oliveback (Nesocharis shelleyi) ©Ron Knight

Shelley’s Oliveback (Nesocharis shelleyi) ©Ron Knight

The smallest species of the family is the Shelley’s Oliveback (Nesocharis shelleyi) at a mere 3.3 in (8.3 centimetres), although the lightest species is the Black-rumped Waxbill (Estrilda troglodytes) at 0.21 oz (6 g). The largest species is the Java Sparrow (Padda oryzivora), at 6.7 in (17 cm) and 0.88 oz (25 g). (Wikipedia with editing)

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“Declare His glory among the nations, His marvelous works among all the peoples.” (Psalms 96:3 AMP)

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“My Jesus I Love Thee” ~ by Meagan Fee at Faith Baptist

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More Sunday Inspirations

Estrildidae – Waxbills, Munias and allies

Assurance: The Certainty of Salvation

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