Sunday Inspiration – Waxbills and Allies II

Tricolored Parrotfinch (Erythrura tricolor) ©WikiC

Tricolored Parrotfinch (Erythrura tricolor) ©WikiC

Last Sunday the first half of the Waxbills and allies were shown. This week we will finish up the large family of 141 species. You will see birds with these names; Finch, Firetail, Parrotfinch, Silverbill, Mannikin, Munia, and Sparrows.

“Parrotfinches are small, colorful passerine birds belonging to the genus Erythrura in the family Estrildidae, the estrildid finches. They occur from South-east Asia to New Guinea, northern Australia and many Pacific Islands. They inhabit forest, bamboo thickets and grassland and some can be found in man-made habitats such as farmland, parks and gardens. Several species are commonly kept as cagebirds.

The plumage is usually mainly green. Most species have blue or red markings on the head and a red rump and tail. The tail is pointed and often fairly long. Seeds, especially those of grasses, comprise the bulk of the diet. Some parrotfinches also feed on fruit and small insects. Many species forage in flocks, keeping in contact with high-pitched calls.” (Wikipedia with editing)

Double-barred Finch (Taeniopygia bichenovii) ©Wiki

Lonchura is a genus of the estrildid finch family, and includes munias (or minias), mannikins, and silverbills. They are resident breeding birds in Africa and in South Asia from India and Sri Lanka east to Indonesia and the Philippines. The name mannikin is from Middle Dutch mannekijn ‘little man’ (also the source of the different bird name manakin).

They are small gregarious birds which feed mainly on seeds, usually in relatively open habitats, preferring to feed on the ground or on reeds of grasses. Several species have been noted to feed on algae such as Spirogyra.

The nest is a large domed grass structure into which four to ten white eggs are laid. Some species also build communal roosting nests for overnight rest.

The species in this genus are similar in size and structure, with stubby bills, stocky bodies and long tails. Most are 10–12 cm in length. Plumage is usually a combination of browns, black and white, with the sexes similar, but duller and less contrasted for immature birds.” (Wikipedia with editing)

Also, last week, some how I didn’t get Meagan’s song posted right and it didn’t play. It has been corrected now, but I am going to use it again because it is so well done.

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Jesus said to them, “If God were your Father, you would love Me, for I proceeded forth and came from God; nor have I come of Myself, but He sent Me. (John 8:42 NKJV)


“My Jesus I Love Thee” ~ by Meagan Fee at Faith Baptist

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Sunday Inspiration – Waxbill and Allies I

Sunday Inspiration

Estrildidae – Waxbills, Munias & Allies

Sharing The Gospel

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Sunday Inspiration – Weavers and Allies

Baya Weaver (Ploceus philippinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Baya Weaver (Ploceus philippinus) by Nikhil Devasar

Where the birds make their nests;  (Psalms 104:17a NKJV)

This week’s birds have interesting names. Weavers do exactly what the name implies. The Lord created them with the ability to take grasses plus other material and weave their nest. Some can be quite a masterpiece. Also in the family of 109 species are the Malimbus, Quelea, Fody, Bishops, and the Widowbird. When A J Mithra was writing for the blog, before he went on to be with the Lord, he wrote four devotionals about these birds. (See Below)

Long-tailed Widowbird (Euplectes progne) ©WikiC

Long-tailed Widowbird (Euplectes progne) ©WikiC

This family’s species “are seed-eating birds with rounded conical bills, most of which are from Sub-Saharan Africa, with fewer species in tropical Asia. A few species have been introduced outside their native range. The weaver group is divided into the buffalo, sparrow, typical, and widow weavers. The males of many species are brightly coloured, usually in red or yellow and black, some species show variation in colour only in the breeding season.” (Wikipedia)

Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart, to work all manner of work, of the engraver, and of the cunning workman, and of the embroiderer, in blue, and in purple, in scarlet, and in fine linen, and of the weaver, even of them that do any work, and of those that devise cunning work. (Exodus 35:35 KJV) (bolding mine)

That verse tells about the abilities that the Lord gave those who were going to work on the Tabernacle. They had been filled with wisdom that the Lord had put in their hearts. The same great Creator gave these Weaver birds a wisdom to do this weaving. What a Great God We Serve.

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“Jesus What A Might Name” – Pastor Jerry w/Choir and Orchestra

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More Sunday Inspirations

Ploceidae – Weavers, Widowbirds

Ploceidae – Wikipedia

Articles by A J Mithra:

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Sunday Inspiration – Wrens

Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) by Lee

God, who made the world and everything in it, since He is Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in temples made with hands. (Acts 17:24 NKJV)

The Troglodytidae – Wrens Family was the one skipped over in the Sunday Inspiration last week. There are 84 species in the family, so they deserve their own blog. The family name Troglodytidae is derived from troglodyte, which means “cave-dweller”, and the wrens get their scientific name from the tendency of some species to forage in dark crevices.

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Raymond Barlow

Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) by Raymond Barlow

Wrens are medium-small to very small birds. The Eurasian wren is among the smallest birds in its range, while the smaller species from the Americas are among the smallest passerines in that part of the world. They range in size from the white-bellied wren, which averages under 10 cm (3.9 in) and 9 g (0.32 oz), to the giant wren, which averages about 22 cm (8.7 in) and weighs almost 50 g (1.8 oz). The dominating colors of their plumage are generally drab, composed of gray, brown, black, and white, and most species show some barring, especially to tail and/or wings. No sexual dimorphism is seen in the plumage of wrens, and little difference exists between young birds and adults. All have fairly long, straight to marginally decurved bills.

Bewick's Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) by Daves BirdingPix

Bewick’s Wren (Thryomanes bewickii) by Daves BirdingPix

Wrens have loud and often complex songs, sometimes given in duet by a pair. The song of members of the genera Cyphorhinus and Microcerculus have been considered especially pleasant to the human ear, leading to common names such as song wren, musician wren, flutist wren, and southern nightingale-wren.

Then God saw everything that He had made, and indeed it was very good. So the evening and the morning were the sixth day. (Genesis 1:31 NKJV)

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“He is Everything To Me” – Men’s Ensemble – Faith Baptist

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More Sunday Inspirations

Sermons From My Pastor