Lee’s One Word Monday – 3/28/16

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Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

NAME

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Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa) by Dan

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More Daily Devotionals

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Birds of the World – Furnariidae – Ovenbird Family

White-eyed Foliage-gleaner (Automolus leucophthalmus) by Dario Sanches

White-eyed Foliage-gleaner (Automolus leucophthalmus) by Dario Sanches

And thou shalt not glean thy vineyard, neither shalt thou gather every grape of thy vineyard; thou shalt leave them for the poor and stranger: I am the LORD your God. (Leviticus 19:10 KJV)

Yesterday you were introduced to the Firewood-gatherer from the Ovenbird – Furnariidae Family. Let’s look at some more things about this family. There are presently (IOC 3.3) 307 species assigned together, but it is such a diverse group. There are over 70 Genera listed. Number one, the Ovenbird, is not even a member of this family. You have to look for it in the Parulidae – New World Warblers to find it.

The Ovenbird name seems to be from the fact that many of these birds make an “oven style” nest or at least one that has an opening to enter or a covering, not the “cup type” of nest of many birds. Most are  insectivores that are mostly arboreal in nature. Insects form the majority of the diet, with some spiders, centipides, millipides and even lizards being taken as well.

They are sub-divided into subfamilies which help find them. It is the names of these birds that have caught my attention this time. Listen to these names:

Tawny-throated Leaftosser (Sclerurus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

Tawny-throated Leaftosser (Sclerurus mexicanus) by Michael Woodruff

Subfamily: Sclerurinae ~~ Miners and Leaftossers

Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (Glyphorynchus spirurus) by Michael Woodruff

Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (Glyphorynchus spirurus) by Michael Woodruff

Subfamily: Dendrocolaptinae ~~ Woodcreepers

  • Tribe: Sittasomini – “intermediate” woodcreepers
  • Tribe: Dendrocolaptini – “strong-billed” woodcreepers and scythebills
Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus) ©WikiC

Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus) ©WikiC

Subfamily: Furnariinae ~~ Neotropical ovenbirds and allies

  • Xenops and Palmcreeper
  • Tribe Pygarrhichini – Treerunner, Xenops, Earthcreeper
  • Tribe Furnariini – Horneros and allies (Tuftedcheeks, Barbtail, Earthcreeper, Cinclodes, Streamcreeper, Rushbird, Reedhaunter)
  • Tribe Philydorini – Foliage-gleaners and allies (Xenops, Treehunter, Canebrake, Woodhaunter)
  • Tribe Synallaxini – Spinetails and allies (Treerunners, Barbtails, Rayaditos, Wiretail, Canasteros, Reedhaunter,Softtails, Thorntails, Firewood-gatherer, Brushrunner, Prickletail, Plushcrown, Graytails, Graveteiro)

Just reading the names you can almost image what they do. Many of them are “creepers,” “runners,” “gleaners,” “haunters,” and then others have their tail described. The tails are Barb, Spine, Wire, Soft, Thorn, Prickle and Gray. The Runners are apparently running up Trees or in the Stream. Not sure what the Miners are digging for, but maybe they are trying to find insects in the ground, whereas the Leaf-tossers are probably looking under leaves for their lunch. They don’t appear to be a “lazy” bird family.

This is a family that I could see being named by what they were doing or how their tail looked. After the birds were created, the Lord brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. What ever he decided to call them, that was their name. Maybe this is how Adam named them by observing their behaviors. Others from another family may have had a different way he named them.

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field. But for Adam there was not found a helper comparable to him. (Genesis 2:19-20 NKJV)

Some interesting articles about this family:

Birds of Brazil – Woodpeckers, Woodcreepers and Foliage-gleaners by Mark George

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Wordless Birds

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Birds of the Bible – Names of Birds Study – Preparation

Where do we start? (See the Introduction to this study) I personally just re-read the following articles:

I had forgotten that I have been so busy. This is being composed as I am doing my study and will describe my actions as I do them. My e-Sword program is running, plus I have the internet available. There are other great Bible programs out there, but e-Sword is easy to use and it’s free. I have purchased some various versions and commentaries to use with over the years. Also, if you go to the Links section of e-Sword, there you will find places for more additions to add to your e-Sword program. My favorite is Bible Support.

List of all my Bibles in e-Sword

List of all my Bibles in e-Sword

Needless to say, I don’t use them all, but like to have them for when I compare the different versions as you have read in other articles.

Menu Bar for e-Sword

Menu Bar for e-Sword

This is the best place to start. The menu bar has the Binoculars close to the center of the photo. (All true birdwatchers know what those are) When the Search (binocular) is pressed a dialog box pops up. I put in “bird name” and then pressed the “OK” button. Here is what comes up.

Bible Search - bird name

Bible Search – bird name

When I did that first with the KJV nothing came up because that verse uses “fowl” not “bird” so the NKJV was selected and this is the result. The first place where birds were named and by whom.

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

Using compare opens with all the different versions showing that verse. The KJV+ in the photo shows the Strong’s numbers and when the mouse is placed on the numbers a box appears. Now you can see the words in the original languages. If we are going to study about the different names for the clean and unclean birds and other birds throughout the Bible, this will be very handy. Whether you are studying about birds or whatever, this is very useful.

Compare of Genesis 2:19 with Hebrew 5775 for fowl open.

Compare of Genesis 2:19 with Hebrew 5775 for fowl open.

Okay for now. If you do not have a Bible program, try loading one and you can always use e-Sword. There are other Bible programs for the Tablets that will let you do searches also. I also have Study Bibles and my Bird Books handy. Get prepared and this will be continued. Don’t forget to ask for the Lord’s help.

In the mean time, my real binoculars are calling to me to aim them at some birds.

Birds of the Bible – Birds and Names?

Pin-tailed Parrotfinch (Erythrura prasina) ©WikiC

Pin-tailed Parrotfinch (Erythrura prasina) ©WikiC

The devotional a few days ago from Days of Praise had one called The Names of Men. They were referring to the many list of names of people in the Bible and how many of them are unknowns. Why are they listed? The article gives a good answer to that, but here is the main point of it:

And these are the names of the men that shall stand with you: of the tribe of Reuben; Elizur the son of Shedeur. (Numbers 1:5 KJV)

“He wants to assure us that He is interested not only in the Abrahams, Daniels, Pauls, and other great men in His kingdom, but also in the Elizurs and Shedeurs and Bills and Kates in His spiritual family.

There are many millions of names “written in the Lamb’s book of life” and the heavenly Lamb–the Lord Jesus Christ–is also the Good Shepherd that “calleth his own sheep by name” The names in His book here on earth are an assurance that He knows and calls us by each of our names in His book in heaven. ”

Saffron-billed Sparrow (Arremon flavirostris) by Dario Sanches

Saffron-billed Sparrow (Arremon flavirostris) by Dario Sanches

How does this tie in with birds? We know that the Lord knows the birds because the Word tells us that not a one falls without His knowledge.

I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine. (Psalms 50:11 NKJV)

Consider the ravens, for they neither sow nor reap, which have neither storehouse nor barn; and God feeds them. Of how much more value are you than the birds? (Luke 12:24 NKJV)

Who teaches us more than the beasts of the earth, And makes us wiser than the birds of heaven?’ (Job 35:11 NKJV)

Are not two little sparrows sold for a penny? And yet not one of them will fall to the ground without your Father’s leave (consent) and notice. (Matthew 10:29 AMP)

If the Lord knows every birds need, cares about them and knows when they fall, do you not think we are noticed? He knows all of our names and if you know Him as your personal Saviour, your name has been written in the Book of Life.

Gospel Message

More Birds of the Bible

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How To Learn A Bird’s Name

Topography of a Bird - Bluebird

Topography of a Bird – Bluebird – Color Key to NA Birds, 1912

INTRODUCTION

HOW TO LEARN A BIRD’S NAME

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

“How can I learn to know the birds?” is the first question of the seeker after bird-lore. The scientist’s reply, “By shooting them and studying their structure and markings in detail,” may do for the few who, like himself, desire to know the birds scientifically; but it is emphatically not the answer to give the ninety and nine who, while they desire to secure an intimate, accurate knowledge of birds, will not gain it at the sacrifice of bird-life.

In the present volume, therefore, an attempt has been made so to group, figure, and describe our birds that any species may be named which has been definitely seen. The birds are kept in their systematic Orders, a natural arrangement, readily comprehended, but, further than this, accepted classifications have been abandoned and the birds have been grouped according to color and markings.

A key to the Orders gives the more prominent characters on which they are based; telling for example, the external differences between a Duck and a Grebe. In comparatively few instances, however, will the beginner have much difficulty in deciding to what Order a bird belongs. Probably eight times, out of ten the unknown bird will belong to the Order Passeres, or Perching Birds, when one has only to select the color section in which it should be placed, choose from among the colored figures the bird whose identity is sought, and verify one’s selection by reading the description of the bird’s characteristics and the outline of its range.

In the case of closely related species, and particularly subspecies, the subjects of range and season are of the utmost importance. Most subspecies resemble their nearest allies too closely to be identified in life by color alone, and in such cases a bird’s name is to be learned by its color in connection with its distribution and the season in which it is seen.

During the breeding period, unless one chance to be in a region where two races intergrade, subspecific names may be applied to the bird in nature with some certainty, for it is a law that only one subspecies of a species can nest in the same area; but during migrations and in the winter, when several subspecies of one species may be found associated, it is frequently impossible to name them with accuracy.

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) in nest by Ray

American Robin (Turdus migratorius) in nest by Ray

For example, during the summer one need have no hesitancy in calling the Robins of the lowlands of South Carolina the Southern Robin (Turdus migratorius achrusterus) but later, when the Northern Robins (Turdus migratorius migratorius) begin to appear, it would be difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish them in life from the resident birds.

If it were possible to impress the student, who proposes to name the bird in the bush, with the absolute necessity for careful, definite observation he would be saved many disappointing and discouraging experiences.

It is not possible to examine your bird too thoroughly. Never be satisfied with a superficial view and a general impression. Look at your bird, if you can, from several points of view; study its appearance in detail, its size, bill, crown, back, tail, wings, throat, breast, etc., and AT ONCE enter what you see in a note-book kept for that purpose. In this way, and this way alone, can you expect to compete with those who use the gun.

It does not follow, however, that because one does not collect specimens of birds one cannot study them scientifically. While the student may not be interested in the classification of birds purely from the standpoint of the systematist, he is strongly urged to acquaint himself with at least the arrangement of the Orders and Families of our birds and their leading structural characters.

To the student who desires to prepare himself for his work afield such a study may well come before he attempts to name the birds. But where the chief end in view is to learn a bird’s name, the more technical side of the subject may be deferred. In any event, it should not be neglected. This orderly arrangement of knowledge will not only be practical benefit in one’s future labors but it will bring with it that sense of satisfaction which accompanies the assurance that we know what we know.

Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) by S Slayton

Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) by S Slayton

As one learns to recognize bird after bird it is an admirable plan to classify systematically one’s list of bird acquaintances under their proper Orders and Families. These may be learned at once from the systematic table at the end of the book, where the numbers which precede each species are arranged serially, and hence systematically.

In some instances, as an aid to identification in the field, descriptions of birds’ notes have been included. It is not supposed that these descriptions will convey an adequate idea of a bird’s song to a person who has never heard it, but it is hoped that they may occasionally lead to the recognition of calls or songs when they are heard.

An adequate method of transcribing bird’s notes has as yet to be devised and the author realizes only too well how unsatisfactory the data here presented will appear to the student. It is hoped, however, that they may sometimes prove of assistance in naming birds in life.

As has been said before, the aim of this volume is to help students to learn the names of our birds in their haunts. But we should be doing scant justice to the possibilities of bird study if, even by silence, we should imply that they ended with the learning to know the bird. This is only the beginning of the quest which may bring us into close intimacy with the secrets of nature. The birds’ haunts and food, their seasons and times of coming and going; their songs and habits during courtship, their nest-building, egg-laying, incubating and care of their young, these and a hundred other subjects connected with their lives may claim our attention and by increasing our knowledge of bird-life, add to our love of birds.

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The above is from the Color Key To North American Birds, 1912. Some of that information is going to be incorporated into various articles, especially the Birdwatching and Birds of the World sections.

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Birds of the Bible – Names of Birds II

White-tailed Hawk (Buteo albicaudatus) by Daves BirdingPix

White-tailed Hawk (Buteo albicaudatus) by Daves BirdingPix

In the first Names of Birds, I covered the English names of birds. This time the scientific names are going to be looked at, especially the second one. (The first part of the scientific name is the bird’s genus or group) “Birds normally have a scientific name and a common name. The scientific name is usually Latin-bases and is agreed upon by biologists across the world. The common name will vary by region, culture, and language.” (birding.com) No matter what the bird is called in different countries or by different ornithology groups, the scientific name refers to one specific bird. Birds do migrate many miles and spend time in many countries. This naming system helps keep from having the same bird counted numerous times in lists.

As I have worked with the list of the Birds of the World, I have observed similarities in the naming of the birds. For instance, “alba” is the second part of all of these birds–Western Great Egret, White Cockatoo, Sanderling, White Tern, White Wagtail, African Spoonbill, Phoenix Petrel, Western Barn Owl. Could you figure out what color they all are?

White-throated Honeyeater (Melithreptus albogularis) by Tom Tarrant

White-throated Honeyeater (Melithreptus albogularis) by Tom Tarrant

How about “albicauda“–White-tailed Shrike-Tyrant, White-tailed Blue Flycatcher, White-tailed Lark, White-tailed Hawk? Or “albogularis“–White-throated Jacamar, Rufous-banded Honeyeater, White-throated Pewee, White-throated Canary, White-throated Laughingthrush, White-throated Screech Owl, White-throated Honeyeater, White-throated Francolin, White-throated Caracara, White-throated Treerunner, White-spotted Fantail, White-throated Seedeater, White-throated Kingbird, White-chested White-eye? That last group was not all “white-throated,” in name, but they have white throats.

We know that Adam named the birds and other critters as the Scripture tells us:

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. So Adam gave names to all cattle, to the birds of the air, and to every beast of the field. But for Adam there was not found a helper comparable to him. (Genesis 2:19-20 NKJV)

Blue-throated Bee-eater (Merops viridis) by Ray

Blue-throated Bee-eater (Merops viridis) by Ray

Did Adam use scientific names? I doubt it. Adam didn’t have to go though all this. Today the ornithologist (those who study birds) use this method of naming along with a common name in whatever language they speak.

Thought you might find it interesting to see some of the species’ second scientific names:
Colors:
albus/alba, white; cf albino, ater/atra, matt black, brachy-, short (Greek), brunne-, brown, caeruleus, blue, canus, grey, chloro-, green or yellow (Greek), cinerea-, grey or ash-coloured; cf cinders, crocus, cyan, blue, erythro-, red (Greek), flava, yellow, fuscus/fusca, dusky, guttatus, speckled or spotted, haema-, blood-red (Greek); cf haemoglobin, leuco-, white (Greek), lineatus, lined or striped, livia, blue-grey, longi-, long, luteus/lutea, yellow, major, greater, mega-, great (Greek), melas, black (Greek); cf melanistic, minor, lesser, niger/nigra, glossy black; cf negro, punctatus, spotted; cf punctuation, pusilla, tiny, rosea, rosy, ruber, red, rufus/rufa, red, striatus/striata, striped, versicolor, many-collored, varied, viridis, green, albogularis – White-throated
Countries:
abyssinicus, africana, americana, angolensis, antarctica,
Characteristics:
cauda, tail, –cephalus, head (Greek), –ceps, capped, headed, cilla, tail, collis, neck,  cristatus, crested, dactyl, finger or toe (Greek), frons, front, i.e. forehead, –gularis, throat, –ops, eye, –opsis, face, ptera, wing (Greek), –rhynchos, bill (Greek), –rostris, bill, torquatus, collared

Names are important and have meaning. Christ was named long before He was born. It was foretold.

Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. (Matthew 1:22-23 KJV)
After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.  (Matthew 6:9 KJV)
And in his name shall the Gentiles trust. (Matthew 12:21 KJV)
And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen.
(Matthew 28:18-20 KJV)

(Some information from Scientific bird names explained)