Pleasant Surprise – Petrel and Crow

Leach’s Storm Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) BJU Bird Collection 2018

Just realized I didn’t post this. Again, it is a duplicate of a Waterman Bird Collection – Part II – Petrel & Crow article on the Birds of the Bible for Kids blog. [I am behind in blogging] This time it is about the Leach’s Storm Petrel and the Crow.

As promised, in Waterman Bird Collection – Part II, here are the last two birds from that display. The Leach’s Storm Petrel and the Crow will now be introduced. Many of you already have heard of a Crow, but how about a Storm Petrel? Let’s see what we can find out about these avian creations from the Creator.

BJU Bird Collection 2018 Bottom Shelf

The two birds today are the two right hand birds in the Display.

The Leach’s Storm Petrel [at the top] is starting to show a tiny bit of deterioration, but considering it’s over 100 years old, it’s not too much.

“The Leach’s Storm Petrel or Leach’s Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) is a small seabird of the tubenose order. It is named after the British zoologist William Elford Leach. The scientific name is derived from Ancient Greek. Oceanodroma is from okeanos, “ocean” and dromos, “runner”, and leucorhoa is from leukos, “white” and orrhos, “rump”.

“It breeds on inaccessible islands in the colder northern areas of the Atlantic and Pacific. It nests in colonies close to the sea in well concealed areas such as rock crevices, shallow burrows or even logs. It lays a single white egg which often has a faint ring of spots at the large end. This storm petrel is strictly nocturnal at the breeding sites to avoid predation by gulls and skuas, and will even avoid coming to land on clear moonlit nights. The largest colony of Leach’s storm petrels can be found on Baccalieu Island of eastern Canada, an ecological reserve with more than 3 million pairs of the bird.” [Wikipedia with editing]

Fun Fact: “Flies swiftly, erratically, buoyantly with 1 or 2 fast, powerful flaps followed by glides on wings held well above the horizontal and noticeably kinked; sudden changes of direction impart a bounding quality. Flutters less than other storm-petrels.” [Neotropical Birds]

Drinks salt water – Formed By Him – Sea Birds That Drink Seawater, is an interesting article about Tubenose birds.

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) BJU Bird Collection 2018

The last bird in the part of the collection is a Crow. It wasn’t shown which one exactly, so we are using the American Crow.

“The American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) is a large passerine bird species of the family Corvidae. It is a common bird found throughout much of North America. American crows are the new world counterpart to the carrion crow and the hooded crow. Although the American crow and the hooded crow are very similar in size, structure and behavior, their calls are different. The American crow nevertheless occupies the same role the hooded crow does in Eurasia.”

Florida Fish Crow (Corvus ossifragus) at Lake Morton By Dan’sPix

“From beak to tail, an American crow measures 40–50 cm (16–20 in), almost half of which is tail. Mass varies from about 300 to 600 g (11 to 21 oz). Males tend to be larger than females. The most usual call is CaaW!-CaaW!-CaaW!.’

American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) by Ray

“The American crow is all black, with iridescent feathers. It looks much like other all-black corvids. They can be distinguished from the common raven (C. corax) because American crows are smaller and from the fish crow (C. ossifragus) because American crows do not hunch and fluff their throat feathers when they call, and from the carrion crow (C. corone) by the enunciation of their calls.” [American Crow – Wikipedia]

A Cool Fact from American Crows – All About Birds:

  • Crows sometimes make and use tools. Examples include a captive crow using a cup to carry water over to a bowl of dry mash; shaping a piece of wood and then sticking it into a hole in a fence post in search of food; and breaking off pieces of pine cone to drop on tree climbers near a nest.

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Here are the links to this Series:

A Pleasant Surprise At The BJU Homecoming

Pleasant Surprise II

Pleasant Surprise III

 

A Pleasant Surprise – III

BJU Bird Collection 2018 Bottom Shelf

The next set of birds from the Waterman Bird Collection at BJU has five specimens. Four of these birds are found in or near water, but the Crow is not really known as a water bird. [This is a copy of the Waterman Bird Collection – Part II from Birds of the Bible for Kids]

This is the bottom shelf display under the Anatidae Family, just above them. That Family was covered in A Pleasant Surprise – II. I trust you clicked on the links provided to read more about those avian wonders.

Common Loon (Gavia immer) BJU Bird Collection 2018

Common Loon (Gavia immer) BJU Bird Collection 2018

Our big tall bird is a Common Loon. “The common loon or great northern diver (Gavia immer) is a large member of the loon, or diver, family of birds. Breeding adults have a plumage that includes a broad black head and neck with a greenish, purplish, or bluish sheen, blackish or blackish-grey upperparts, and pure white underparts except some black on the undertail coverts and vent. Non-breeding adults are brownish with a dark neck and head marked with dark grey-brown. Their upperparts are dark brownish-grey with an unclear pattern of squares on the shoulders, and the underparts, lower face, chin, and throat are whitish. The sexes look alike, though males are significantly larger and heavier than females. During the breeding season, they live on lakes and other waterways in Canada, the northern United States (including Alaska), as well as in southern parts of Greenland and Iceland. Small numbers breed on Svalbard and sporadically elsewhere in Arctic Eurasia. Common loons winter on both coasts of the US as far south as Mexico, and on the Atlantic coast of Europe.

Common Loon by Raymond Barlow

Common loons eat a wide range of animal prey including fish, crustaceans, insect larvae, mollusks, and occasionally aquatic plant life. They swallow most of their prey underwater, where it is caught, but some larger items are first brought to the surface.” Common Loon – Wikipedia

Here is just one of the Cool Facts from Common Loon – All About Birds

  • Loons are agile swimmers, but they move pretty fast in the air, too. Migrating loons have been clocked flying at speeds more than 70 mph.

Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) BJU Bird Collection 2018

Next to the Loon is a Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena). “Like all grebes, the Red-necked is a good swimmer, a particularly swift diver, and responds to danger by diving rather than flying. The feet are positioned far back on the body, near the tail, which makes the bird ungainly on land. It dives for fish or picks insects off vegetation; it also swallows its own feathers, possibly to protect the digestive system.” Red-necked Grebes – Wikipedia

Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) young on her wing©USFWS

Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena) young on her wing©USFWS

Here is a Cool Fact from Red-necked Grebe – All About Birds

  • The oldest recorded Red-necked Grebe was at least 11 years old when it was found in Minnesota, the same state where it had been banded.

Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) BJU Bird Collection 2018

The smaller Grebe, next to the Red-necked Grebe, is a Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) . They both belong to the Podicipedidae Family. Now that is a bird we see often here in Florida.

Pied-Billed Grebe at Lake Hollingsworth, Lakeland, FL by Dan

Pied-Billed Grebe at Lake Hollingsworth, Lakeland, FL by Dan

“The Pied-billed Grebes (Podilymbus podiceps) is a species of the grebe family of water birds. Since the Atitlán grebe (Podilymbus gigas) has become extinct, it is the sole extant member of the genus Podilymbus. The pied-billed grebe is primarily found in ponds throughout the Americas. Other names of this grebe include American dabchick, dabchick, Carolina grebe, devil-diver, dive-dapper, dipper, hell-diver, pied-billed dabchick, pied-bill, thick-billed grebe, and water witch.”

Pied-billed Grebes are small, stocky, and short-necked. They are mainly brown, with a darker crown and back. Their brown color serves as camouflage in the marshes they live in. They do not have white under their wings when flying, like other grebes. Their undertail is white and they have a short, blunt chicken-like bill that is a light grey color, which in summer is encircled by a broad black band (hence the name). In the summer, its throat is black.”  Pied-billed grebe – Wikipedia [with editing]

A Cool Fact about this from Pied-billed Grebe – All About Birds

  • Pied-billed Grebe chicks typically leave the nest the first day after hatching and spend much of their first week riding around on a parent’s back. They usually spend most of their first 3 weeks on or near the nest platform.

Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) chick ©WikiC

We will check out the other two birds in the display case next.

I trust you will enjoy meeting the various birds through this series. The links provided give much more information, and photos of these species.

“The works of the LORD are great, Studied by all who have pleasure in them.” (Psalms 111:2 NKJV)

Gaviidae – Loons – Family

Podicipedidae – Grebes – Family

 

A Pleasant Surprise At The BJU Homecoming

BJU Homecoming

Dan and I rode up to Greenville, South Carolina to attend the 2018 BJU Homecoming. We had two main events that we attended. When we parked quite a way from the place we were to be, I sort of grumbled because of the long walk with my walker [The campus is on hills]. Yet, the Lord always seems to turn our upside down grumps into upright delights.

BJU Science Building

We parked down by the Science building, where Dan had taught years ago. I decided to take some photos. Thankfully, the building was open, and so began my delight. Inside we found a display of BIRDS! A lot of birds, which were from a collection of specimens that was completed before 1910. It was donated by Mr. Charles E. Waterman.

Waterman Bird Collection BJU 2018 Plaque

There were display cases filled with a Bird specimen collection that had been donated by Mr. Charles E Waterman. The collection is well over 100 years old. The birds have been well preserved, considering the age of ithe collection. My camera received a nice workout. [So did my back]

BJU BUg Collection 2018

BJU BUg Collection 2018

BJU BUg Collection 2018

Today, I want to show you the Bug and Squirrel displays, as the bird photos are still being adjusted. Photos of the display case is to give you an idea of how big those bugs really were. Sure wouldn’t want any of them on me.

BJU Squirrel Collection 2018

The squirrels look as if they were practicing for a football game. :)

God’s Creative Hand is definitely seen in all of these created critters.

“Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath shewed it unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools,” (Romans 1:19-22 KJV)

Bible Conference and Birds in South Carolina

American Robin by Dan

American Robin by Dan

All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: (2Ti 3:16)

An American Robin, two Cardinals and a Mockingbird greeted us here in South Carolina. We also saw a Red-tailed Hawk circling over the campus of Bob Jones University (our Alma mater) and a Red-shouldered Hawk sitting in a tree. Spring is blooming out all around.

We came up here for the Bible Conference and have thoroughly enjoyed and received blessings from all five messages we were able to attend. We are now headed home and will arrive back in Florida soon.

Dr. Sam Horn, from Wisconsin, challenged us to “cast all our cares on the Lord” and to remember that, “we have a Father that knows our need.” His other message was to challenge us to “right living” through the “Divine enablement from God.”

Dr. David Innes, from California, taught on the “Greatness of God.” Two quotes I liked were; “All genuine ministry of life is the overflow of our walk with Christ.” and “God is uniquely Uncreated, Infinite, Triune, and Holy.” His second message was about the “Greatness of God’s Word.”

Dr. Bruce Compton, from Michigan, spoke on the “Relationship between a living faith and God’s Word.

It is good to sit under the ministry of Godly men who teach the Word of God in a concentrated time period, like a Bible Conference. Sometimes it is hard to get away to one, but it is worth the effort. Your soul will be refreshed and challenged.

It was also good to travel to a different state to try to get a glimpse of the birds that they have there. Didn’t see too many, but it was a very profitable trip. The Lord is always gracious.

This trip is why there has not been many articles from me lately. I will soon be back at the keyboard after I get the binoculars out to spot some more birds to write about.

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Using Whatever Talent the Lord Has Given You

Thought I would share an article that I wrote for our church blog (The Fountain).

As many of you know, around Faith Baptist, I am known as the “Bird Lady.” Also many have read the “Birds of the Bible” articles of the past. How did this come about?

When I was 16 years old (1960) I accepted the Lord as my Saviour and thus began my journey with the Lord. The Lord allowed me to attend Bob Jones University through the War Orphans Fund (my father died as a result of the war and my mother died when I was 13). Not being from an educational family (D+ average in high school), I struggled academically, but the desire to finish was strong. I finished my degree 16 years after I started with a Bible major. I had tried many majors, but never found what I wanted.

While we were on vacation this summer, we attended a friend’s church and they were questioning things that became a turning point in our lives. There were various testimonies given and then I remembered one that changed me. In 1979, Dan and I purchased our first computer, a Radio Shack Model I. I spent hours teaching myself all about it and learning to program. That computer and the many since gave me a direction and a niche for me to fill. I always told the Lord that I just didn’t have any talents to offer Him. Long story short, I became a computer teacher and ended up even getting a Masters degree in Computer Education.

Sunbittern at Lowry Park Zoo by Dan

In the late 80’s I became a birdwatcher. A naturalist at our local park became my mentor. I had always loved the out of doors and enjoyed watching God’s creation, but could not put many names on what I saw. Birds are just so beautiful and show the Lord’s creative hand so much. I am just amazed and love watching them. Another niche!

Now there were three important parts to my life; the Lord, computers and birds. (Of course Dan is there also) My desire and prayers were that the Lord would let me blend those three things into some sort of ministry for Him. It began by doing five-minute presentations to a junior Sunday School class each week. When we moved up here to Faith, I couldn’t find an outlet to do my bird presentations until the Lord, through Stephen, let me start doing the “Birds of the Bible” on the blog here.

I started my own blog to learn how to do the articles. Now, the Lord is blessing my blog by letting the “Birds of the Bible” and many other Christian birdwatching articles be read by people all over the world. And, now, I am the “Bird Lady” and I thank the Lord for His Love and Grace to let me be called by that name.

Call unto me, and I will answer thee, and shew thee great and mighty things, which thou knowest not. (Jeremiah 33:3 KJV)

My prayer and challenge for the readers is that you also will let the Lord use what ever talent or gift you have for Him. Maybe you love bugs, flowers, music, or whatever. Maybe you are an encourager, good cook, child sitter, nursery worker, like to visit the sick, etc. We all have something that the Lord has given us. Let the Lord use what you have for Him so that we can help reach others with the Gospel and God’s Love.

Gospel Message

Wordless Birds

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