Birds of the Bible – Psalm 50:11’s Mountain Birds I

Mountain Wheatear (Myrmecocichla monticola) ©WikiC

“I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine.” (Psalm 50:11) NKJV

Hooded Mountain Tanager (Buthraupis montana) ©BirdPhotos.com

This is Part I. Shown are the many translations of Psalm 50:11. God is speaking and telling us that He knows all these birds and cares about them. How much more does God the Creator care about us?
In the next post, there will be more facts about the Birds of the Mountains.
This list of verses came from the Bible Gateway when searching for Birds of the “mountain/s”. Psalm 50:11 was one of them., this is a list of all their translations for that verse. The version links will take you to the verse in that translation.
I know all the fowls of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
“I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
I know and am acquainted with all the birds of the mountains, and the wild animals of the field are Mine and are with Me, in My mind.

Mountain Blackeye (Chlorocharis emiliae) ©WikiC

I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures of the field are mine.
I know every mountain bird; even the insects in the fields are mine.
I know all the birds in the mountains; whatever moves in the fields is mine.

Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) ©Elaine R Wilson WikiC

I know all the birds in the mountains, and every wild creature is in my care.
I know all the fowl of the mountains, and the roaming creatures of the field are mine:
I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
I know every bird in the mountains, and everything that moves in the field is with me.

Mountain Bamboo Partridge (Bambusicola fytchii) by Lee Zoo Miami

I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the hills, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and every living thing in the fields is mine.
I know all the fowls on the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus) ©WikiC

I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
All the wild birds are mine and all living things in the fields.
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures of the field are Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains. Every living thing in the fields is mine.

Rufous-bellied Mountain Saltator (Saltator rufiventris)©Flickr Ron Knight

I know all the birds in the mountains; indeed, everything that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the fowls of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are with me.
I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Tucuman Mountain Finch (Compsospiza baeri) ©Flickr Ron Knight

I know every bird of the mountains, and every moving creature in the field is mine.
For all the animals of field and forest are mine! The cattle on a thousand hills! And all the birds upon the mountains!
“…Every creature in the forest is mine, the wild animals on all the mountains. I know every mountain bird by name; the scampering field mice are my friends. If I get hungry, do you think I’d tell you? All creation and its bounty are mine….”
I know every bird of the mountains, and the creatures that move in the field are Mine.

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus somptuosus) ©Flickr Lip Kee Yap

I know every bird in the mountains. Everything that moves in the fields is mine.
I know every bird in the heights; whatever moves in the wild is mine.
“I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and every living thing in the fields is mine.

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus igniventris) ©Flickr Joao Quental

I keep track of every bird in the hills, and the insects of the field are mine.
I own every bird in the mountains. The insects in the fields belong to me.
I know every bird in the mountains, and the insects in the fields are mine.
I know every bird in the mountains, and the insects in the fields are mine.

Mountain Tailorbird (Phyllergates cucullatus) by© Wiki

I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
I know every bird of the mountains. And all things that move in the field are Mine.
I know every bird on the mountains, and all the animals of the field are mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
Mountain Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) ©WikiC

Mountain Pygmy Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) ©WikiC

I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know kol oph (every bird) of the harim; and the animals of the wild are Mine.
Mountain Caracara (Phalcoboenus megalopterus) ©WikiC

Mountain Caracara (Phalcoboenus megalopterus) ©WikiC

Every animal of field and forest belongs to me, the Creator. I know every movement of the birds in the sky, and every animal of the field is in my thoughts. The entire world and everything it contains is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know all the birds of the air, and all that moves in the field is mine.
I know every bird of the mountains. Everything moving in the field is Mine.
Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian

Mountain Imperial-Pigeon (Ducula badia) by Ian

Every bird flying over the mountains I know; every animal roaming over the fields belongs to Me.
I know all the birds of the mountains. The wild animals of the field are mine.
I have known all the volatiles of the firmament; and the fairness of the field is with me. (I know all the birds on those hills; and the wild beasts of the fields be mine.)
I have known every fowl of the mountains, And the wild beast of the field [is] with Me.

Green-crowned Brilliant and Purple-throated Mountain-Gem by Ray

Additional Psalms 50:11 verses from e-Sword versions loaded [no links]:
(ACV)  I know all the birds of the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(AKJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(ASV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(BBE)  I see all the birds of the mountains, and the beasts of the field are mine.
Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

Mountain Hawk-Eagle (Nisaetus nipalensis) by Peter Ericsson

(Bishops)  I knowe all the foules vpon the mountaynes: and the wylde beastes of the fielde are at my commaundement.
(Brenton)  I know all the birds of the sky; and the beauty of the field is mine.
(DRB)  I know all the fowls of the air: and with me is the beauty of the field.
(ECB)  I know all the flyers of the mountains and the creatures of the field with me.
Mountain Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus sindianus) by Nikhil Devasar

Mountain Chiffchaff (Phylloscopus sindianus) by Nikhil Devasar

(Geneva)  I knowe all the foules on the mountaines: and the wilde beastes of the fielde are mine..
(HRB)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
(IAV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(Phillips) No verse
Brandt's Mountain Finch (Leucosticte brandti) by Nikhil

Brandt’s Mountain Finch (Leucosticte brandti) by Nikhil

(LITV-TSP)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
(JPS)  I know all the fowls of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
(KJ2000)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
White-throated Mountaingem (Lampornis castaneoventris) by Ian

White-throated Mountaingem (Lampornis castaneoventris) by Ian

(KJV-1611)  I know all the foules of the mountaines: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJVA)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(KJV-BRG)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(LITV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and all moving in My fields are Mine;
Mountain Thornbill (Acanthiza katherina) by Ian

Mountain Thornbill (Acanthiza katherina) by Ian

(MKJV)  I know all the birds of the mountains; and the wild beasts of the field are Mine.
(NAS77)  “I know every bird of the mountains, And everything that moves in the field is Mine.
(RV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(The Disciple’s Bible)  I know all the birds of the mountains; And the wild beasts of the field are mine.
Plate-billed Mountain Toucan (Andigena laminirostris) by Michael Woodruff

Plate-billed Mountain Toucan (Andigena laminirostris) by Michael Woodruff

(TRC)  I know all the fowls upon the mountains, and the wild beasts of the field are in my sight.
(TS2009)  “I know all the birds of the mountains, And all moving in My field are Mine.
(UKJV)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.
(Webster)  I know all the fowls of the mountains: and the wild beasts of the field are mine.

Colombian Mountain Grackle (Macroagelaius subalaris) ©WikiC

Birds of the Bible – Birds of the What??

Birds of the Bible

Gospel Message

Birds of the Bible – Birds of the Air Updated

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by Lee

American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) by Lee

The original Birds of the Air post in 2010 needed to be re-posted with some updating. The actual “birds of the air” phrase shows up four times in the King James Version and below you can see that the phrase shows up 21 times in the ESV [English Standard Version]. I use the E-Sword.net on the Computer which lets you load many different versions. It helps when searching, yet I know that not all are true to the original text. The Amplified has 24, BBE [Bible in Basic English] has 17, CJB [Complete Jewish Bible] has 2, DRB [Douay-Reimes] has 22, EMTV [English Majority Text] has 6, HCSB [Holman Christian Study Bible] has 3 all in Daniel, etc. I also now have access to more versions through the Bible Gateway which has some more versions. I am working on a search of the Birds of the ???. Stay tuned.

Looking into that phrase in e-Sword, the English Standard Version (ESV) shows 21 occurrences of “birds of the air.” Surprisingly most of them have to do with the “birds of the air” showing up to eat the carnage of men as a result of judgment or disease. See Deuteronomy 28:26; I Samuel 17:44, 17:46; Jeremiah 7:33, 15:3, 16:4, 19:7, 34:20. 4:25 and 9:10 speak of the birds of the air fleeing away.

White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) by Africaddict

White-backed Vulture (Gyps africanus) by Africaddict

Rizpah spread sackcloth over the bodies of Saul and Jonathan and “And she did not allow the birds of the air to come upon them by day, or the beasts of the field by night” in 2 Samuel 21:10.

Job 28:20,21 says, “From where, then, does wisdom come? And where is the place of understanding? It is hidden from the eyes of all living and concealed from the birds of the air.”

Eastern Yellow Robin (Eopsaltria australis) on nest by Ian

Eastern Yellow Robin (Eopsaltria australis) on nest by Ian

In the New Testament the “birds of the air” is used in different ways. Matthew 6:25 lets us know that the birds of the air “neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? “ Matthew 8:20 and Luke 9:58 reminds of that the birds have nest, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head. The parable of the mustard seed in Matthew 13:32, Mark 4:32 and Luke 13:19 tell of the plant growing up and the birds making nests in it and enjoying its shade.

The last references to birds of the air appear in Acts 10:12 and 11:6. Peter had a sheet descend with all kinds of animals, reptiles, and birds in it. This was to teach Peter and others that Jew and Gentile believers alike are equal in God’s sight.

Mr and Mrs Wood Duck by Lee

Mr and Mrs Wood Duck by Lee

What I like about the “birds of the air” is that none of the birds are mentioned by name. That gives lots of future articles for “Bird of the Bible” that can include any of the birds that our Lord has created.

So God created the great sea creatures and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarm, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. (Genesis 1:21 ESV)

The Gospel Message

Placing your mouse over the Green verses will pop them out.

Avian And Attributes – Sharp Part I

Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) Female ©WikiC

“For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.” (Hebrews 4:12-13 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Sharp

SH’ARP, a.
1. Having a very thin edge or a fine point; keen; acute; not blunt. Thus we may say, a sharp knife, or a sharp needle. A sharp edge easily severs a substance; a sharp point is easily made to penetrate,it.
2. Terminating in a point or edge; not obtuse; as, a hills terminates in a sharp peak, or a sharp ridge.
3. Forming an acute or too small angle at the ridge; as a sharp roof.
4. Acute of mind; quick to discern or distinguish; penetrating; ready at invention; witty; ingenious.

“Thy tongue deviseth mischiefs; like a sharp razor, working deceitfully.” (Psalms 52:2 KJV)


Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) ©WikiC

There are many “Sharp” named birds, but for this post, we will mention two of them. The Sharp-beaked Ground Finch and the Sharpbill. There will be more in a second article.

Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) ©Nancy Bell Mangoverde

The Sharp-beaked Ground Finch (Geospiza difficilis) is a species of bird in the Tanager family Thraupidae. It is classified as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and it is native to the Galápagos Islands in Ecuador. It has a mass of around 20 grams (0.71 oz) and the males have black plumage, while females have streaked brown plumage. This finch was described by Richard Bowdler Sharpe in 1888.

This relatively small, slender-billed finch is endemic to the Galápagos Islands, where it is found on Fernandina, Santiago, Pinta, Genovesa, Darwin, and Wolf Islands. On the first three islands, it breeds in the humid highlands and disperses afterwards, but on the remaining smaller and lower islands the sharp-beaked ground finch is found in the arid zone year-round. Due to habitat destruction its range has decreased. It was formerly also present in the highlands of several other islands, and it is possible it still occurs on Isabela.

Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) ©WikiC

The Sharpbill (Oxyruncus cristatus) is a small passerine bird in the family Tityridae. Its range is from the mountainous areas of tropical South America and southern Central America (Panama and Costa Rica).

It inhabits the canopy of wet forest and feeds on fruit and some invertebrates. It has an orange erectile crest, black-spotted yellowish underparts and scaling on the head and neck. As its name implies, it has a straight, pointed beak, which gives its common name.

Sharpbills are most commonly found in tall dense forests but occasionally venture to the forest edge. Their diet consists of primarily of fruit, but they will also take insects, hanging upside down in from twigs to obtain insect larvae.


Sharp-Beaked Ground Finch – The Bloodsucker..

More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “S”

Good News

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Avian And Attributes – Myrtle

Myrtle Warbler (Setophaga coronata) by Anthony747

Myrtle Warbler (Setophaga coronata) by Anthony747

“So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth: it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it. For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forth with peace: the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands. Instead of the thorn shall come up the fir tree, and instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle tree: and it shall be to the LORD for a name, for an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.” (Isaiah 55:11-13 KJV)


Avian and Attributes – Myrtle

MYR’TLE, n. [L. myrtus.] A plant of the genus Myrtus, of several species. The common myrtle rises with a shrubby upright stem, eight or ten feet high. Its branches form a close full head, closely garnished with oval lanceolate leaves. It has numerous small, pale flowers from the axillas, singly on each footstalk.


Myrtle (Yellow-rumped) Warbler (Setophaga coronata) breeding ©WikiC

Myrtle warbler (Setophaga coronata) is a small New World warbler.

This passerine bird was long known to be closely related to its western counterpart, Audubon’s warbler, and at various times the two forms have been classed as separate species or grouped as yellow-rumped warblers, Setophaga coronata. The two forms most likely diverged when the eastern and western populations were separated in the last ice age. In North America, the two forms are now again officially recognized as conspecific.

The myrtle warbler has a northerly and easterly distribution, with Audubon’s further west. It breeds in much of Canada and the northeastern USA. It is migratory, wintering in the southeastern United States, eastern Central America, and the Caribbean. It is a rare vagrant to western Europe, and has wintered in Great Britain. Its breeding habitat is a variety of coniferous and mixed woodland. Myrtle warblers nest in a tree, laying 4–5 eggs in a cup nest.

The summer male myrtle warbler has a slate blue back, and yellow crown, rump and flank patch. It has white tail patches, and the breast is streaked black. The female has a similar pattern, but the back is brown as are the breast streaks.

The myrtle can be distinguished from Audubon’s warbler by its whitish eyestripe, white (not yellow) throat, and contrasting cheek patch. Their trill-like songs, nearly indistinguishable, consist of a 3–4 syllable “tyew-tyew-tyew-tyew”, sometimes followed by 3 more “tew”‘s. The call is a hard check.


More Avian and Attributes

Birds whose first or last name starts with “M”

Wordless Toucan

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]

Lee’s Five Word Friday – 5/20/16

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Australian Pipit (Anthus australis) ©WikiC chicks

I OPENED MY MOUTH WIDE

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I opened my mouth wide and panted, For I longed for Your commandments.” (Psalms 119:131 NASB)

Australian Pipit (Anthus australis) ©WikiC chicks

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More Daily Devotionals

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