Eggs Taste Better if Salted

Eggs  Taste  Better  if  Salted

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

Can that which is unsavory be eaten without salt? Or is there any taste in the white of an egg?  (Job 6:6)

eggs-neptune-crabcake.TripAdvisor

EGGS NEPTUNE (eggs Benedict with crab — Trip Advisor photo)

Although we Americans sometimes over-salt our food,  it is nonetheless true  that it is perfectly Biblical  to salt poultry eggs  before you eat them  —  but what about crab eggs?

Since, during spring stopovers, Red Knots eat lots of Horseshoe Crab eggs on the beaches of Delaware Bay,  —  and the crabs who deposited those eggs just came from the salty seawater of the Atlantic Ocean,  —  it’s unlikely that the voracious Red Knots need to add salt, to flavor those crab eggs for eating.

As an illustration of Genesis 8:22, this bird-blog has already reported on the magnificent migration of the Red Knot, which mileage-marathon marvel annually feasts on beach-buried Horseshoe Crab eggs during its yearly stopover at Delaware Bay, before the refueled shorebird continues its migration northward (toward its breeding grounds in Canada) during the spring.  [See “Shorebirds Looney about Horseshoe Crabs”, at https://leesbird.com/2017/08/11/shorebirds-looney-about-horseshoe-crab-eggs/ .]

RedKnot-DelawareBay-beach.GregoryBreese-USFWS

RED KNOT at Delaware Bay beach (USFWS photo / public domain)

As this USFWS chart (created by Debra Reynolds) shows, the long-distance adventures of the Rufa Red Knot are, in their repeated successes, providential miracles of populational migration.  

In other words, when we think about how this works out, during each migratory cycle, our minds should automatically think about how amazingly clever and capable God is, to have arranged all of the Red Knot’s long-distance (and metabolic) bioengineering to work.  The Red Knot is providentially programmed (“fitted”) to survive and thrive like this[This can be compared to the providential programming that God has installed into the Arctic Tern   —   see “Survival of the Fitted:  God’s Providential Programming”, ACTS & FACTS, 39(10):17-18 (October 2010), posted at http://www.icr.org/article/survival-fitted-gods-providential-programming/ .]

RedKnot-migration-infochart.USFWS

Of course, the hungry Red Knot is not alone in this all-you-can-eat “fast-food” fiesta – because the Red Knot is joined, at Delaware Bay beaches, by oövorous (i.e., egg-eating) “tablemates” including turnstones and sandpipers.   [See Delaware Bay beach photographs below:  left, USF&W / public domain;  right, Larry Niles.]

All of which leads us to today’s limerick:

CONVERTING  CRAB  EGGS  INTO  MIGRATORY  BIRD  FUEL

Red Knots scoot about, on thin legs;

First come, first serve! — no one begs;

Horseshoe crab eggs, the treat

And it’s “all-you-can-eat“!

Watch the shorebirds gulp down the crab eggs!

RedKnots-eating-crab-eggs.NJEnvtNews

RED KNOTS eating crab eggs (N.J. Environment News photo)

Hmm, now I’m hungry!  —  it’s time to eat a couple of poached eggs, that my gourmet-whiz wife prepared for me this morning.   (Of course, those eggs are slightly salted!)


 

Arctic Tern, World Class Migrant

Arctic Tern, World Class Migrant

Dr. James J. S. Johnson

And I said, Oh that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away, and be at rest. (Psalm 55:6)

How many humans have admired the ability of birds to fly through the sky? Count me as one such admirer.  What a wonder God’s winged creatures are, as they fly in the air!  And some fly enormous distances.  The bird who flies farthest, twice a year, is the ARCTIC TERN.

ArcticTern-AudubonFieldGuide

ARCTIC TERN (photo credit: Audubon Field Guide / National Audubon Society)

This black-headed seagull migrates twice a year, flying back and forth from near the top of the world (Iceland, Greenland, etc.) to near the bottom (islands near Antarctica)  – sometimes traveling 57,000 miles during a year! It has breeding nests (homes where it lays eggs and cares for its babies when they hatch) in far-north lands like Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Scandinavia, and Russia, then it flies south to near Antarctica as the North gets cold. Because Arctic Terns often swoop over seawater they are also called “sea swallows”. But, unlike swallows (that eat flying bugs), Arctic Terns use their red beaks to catch and eat small fish (as well as little crabs and shrimp-like animals called krill).  And they better time on a regular basis — they certainly need fuel!

Arctic Tern Migration Map_10.jpg

ARCTIC TERN migration map (BBC News / TravelQuaz.com credit)

For more on this circumpolar aviator, see “Arctic Terns Set Mileage Records As Frequent Fliers”, posted at  https://leesbird.com/2016/03/30/arctic-terns-set-mileage-records-as-frequent-fliers/ .


 

 

 

 

 

Harriet, The Osprey

Osprey Harriet’s transmitter is safely attached ©Craig Koppie USFWS

James J. S. Johnson, [Dr. Jim, to me] sent a very interesting article to share with you all. It is about an Osprey, named Harriet, who lives up in the Baltimore, Maryland [USA] area. Recently they, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, mounted a satellite tracker on her. Wait, here is the article:

“…On July 10, Harriet was captured and fitted with a satellite transmitter to track her movements. The transmitter, which has a visible antenna, was comfortably and securely attached by a harness onto Harriet’s back.

Like so many other birds we see around the Chesapeake in spring and summer, ospreys begin to migrate to South America in September for the winter. Most of our Chesapeake osprey spend the colder months there, ranging from Venezuela, to as far south as Paraguay and even Argentina.”

Continue to the article, Hurricanes no match for Baltimore’s Harriet the Osprey on her fall trek, by CLICKING HERE

Harriot’s trip so far – Satelite ©USFWS


“Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south? Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high?” (Job 39:26-27 KJV)

We have also written articles along this line about tracking our migrating avian wonders from the Lord:

A Merry Heart Is Like Medicine

To Do List – Bird Seeds

“A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance: but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken.” (Proverbs 15:13 KJV)

A friend of mine posted this to my Facebook account. Needless to say, it made my day. Working on these broken links can be frustrating at times and when humor comes along, it lightens the day. We all need a good laugh now and then. The Bible mentions a merry heart several times, plus other terms like Joy.

“All the days of the afflicted are evil: but he that is of a merry heart hath a continual feast.” (Proverbs 15:15 KJV)

Most birders are aware that as the seasons change, many Avian Wonders, from their Creator, start their migration south, or north. Some even travel east or west. Many birds make very long migrations, and some make shorter journeys that involve an altitude change only.

I do not normally read the comics, but lately, I subscribed to some daily comics from Arcamax.com. and have been following Peanuts ©  There has been a series of them since fall started, that has the bird, Woodstock, making an effort to fly south. Decided to share them.

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Snoopy and Woodstock – Peanuts Oct 18,2017 [Encountering a tree in the way]

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Snoopy and Woodstock -Peanuts ?  [Finds out Woodstock’s name]

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Snoopy and Woodstock -Peanuts Nov 6,2017 [Not sure which was is south]

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Charles Schulz has been producing Peanuts for years. Snoopy has always been a favorite of mine, and now, I am beginning to feel kindly of Woodstock. Though, I do trust that the “real” birds have a better way of finding their way to their destinations. The Lord has given us assurances that He guides them in the way they should go.

“Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars and spreads his wings toward the south?” (Job 39:26 ESV)

“Even the stork in the sky Knows her seasons; And the turtledove and the swift and the thrush Observe the time of their migration; But My people do not know The ordinance of the LORD.” (Jeremiah 8:7 NASB)

More normal migration articles:

Birds of the Bible – Hawk Migration

Birds of the Bible – Migration September 2009

Interesting – Migration and Mechanics of Flight

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Shorebirds Looney about Horseshoe Crab Eggs

RedKnot-DelawareBay-beach.GregoryBreese-USFWS

Red Knot Eating Crab Eggs at Delaware Bay Beach

Photo by Gregory Breese / USF&WS

Thankfully, the rhythms of our world are fairly predictable. Although the details differ, the overall cycles are regular:

While the earth remains, seedtimes and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease. (Genesis 8:22)

Because of these recurring patterns migratory birds can depend on food being conveniently available when they migrate northward in the spring. In effect,  “fast food” on the beach is a “convenience store” for famished feathered fliers.

For example, consider how the annual egg-laying (and egg-burying) activities of horseshoe crabs perfectly synchronize with the hunger of migratory shorebirds (e.g., red knots, turnstones, and sandpipers) that stopover on bayside beaches, for “fast food”, right where huge piles of crab eggs have just been deposited (and where some have been uncovered by tidewaters).

HorseshoeCrabs-DelawareBay-beach.GregoryBreese-USFWS

Horseshoe Crabs on Delaware Bay Beach

Photo by Gregory Breese / USF&WS

No need to worry about the birds eating too many crab eggs! – the egg-laying is so prolific (i.e., about 100,000 eggs per mother) that many horseshoe crab eggs are missed by the migratory birds, thus becoming the next generation of horseshoe crabs, plus the birds mostly eat the prematurely  surfacing eggs that are less likely to succeed in life anyway!)

Timing is everything. Each spring, shorebirds migrate from wintering grounds in South America to breeding grounds in the Arctic. These birds have some of the longest migrations known. Delaware Bay is the prime stopover site and the birds’ stop coincides with horseshoe crab spawning. Shorebirds like the red knot, ruddy turnstone and semipalmated sandpiper, as well as many others, rely on horseshoe crab eggs to replenish their energy reserves before heading to their Arctic nesting grounds.  The birds arrive in the Arctic before insects emerge. This means that they must leave Delaware Bay with enough energy reserves to make the trip to the Arctic and survive without food until well after they have laid their eggs. If they have not accumulated enough fat reserves at the bay, they may not be able to breed.

The world’s largest spawning population of horseshoe crabs occurs in Delaware Bay. During high tide, horseshoe crabs migrate from deep water to beaches to spawn. The female digs a nest in the sand and deposits between 4,000 and 30,000 eggs that the male will fertilize with sperm. A single crab may lay 100,000 eggs or more during a season. Horseshoe crab spawning begins in late April and runs through mid-August, although peak spawning in the mid-Atlantic takes place May 1 through the first week of June.

At low tide, adult crabs go back into the water but may return at the next high tide. Horseshoe crab spawning increases on nights with a full or new moon, when gravity is stronger and high tides are even higher. At the same time that migrating shorebirds arrive to rest and feed along Delaware Bay, horseshoe crab activity is high. While the crab buries its eggs deeper than shorebirds can reach, waves and other horseshoe crabs expose large numbers of eggs. These surface eggs will not survive, but they provide food for many animals. The shorebirds can easily feed on eggs that have surfaced prematurely.

Quoting Kathy Reshetiloff, “Migratory Birds Shore Up Appetites on Horseshoe Crab Eggs”, THE CHESAPEAKE BAY JOURNAL, 27(3):40 (May 2017).

Shorebirds-HorseshoeCrabs-DelawareBay.LarryNiles

Shorebirds and Horseshoe Crabs on Delaware Bay Beach

Photo by Larry Niles

Notice how it is the gravitational pull of the moon, as the moon goes through its periodic cycle, that causes the high and low tides – which facilitate the uncovering of enough horseshoe crab eggs to satisfy the needs of the migratory stopover shorebirds that pass through Delaware Bay.  Notice how the moon provides a phenological “regulation” (i.e., the moon is physically ruling and correlating the interaction of the horseshoe crabs, the migratory shorebirds, and the bay’s tidewaters – in accordance with and illustrating Genesis 1:16-18).

At low tide, adult crabs go back into the water but may return at the next high tide. Horseshoe crab spawning increases on nights with a full or new moon, when gravity is stronger and high tides are even higher. At the same time that migrating shorebirds arrive to rest and feed along Delaware Bay, horseshoe crab activity is high.

Again quoting Kathy Reshetiloff, “Migratory Birds Shore Up Appetites on Horseshoe Crab Eggs”, THE CHESAPEAKE BAY JOURNAL, 27(3):40 (May 2017).

RedKnot-MigrationMap.NatureConservancy
Map of Red Knot Winter Ranges, Summer Breeding Range, & Migratory Stopovers
Map by The Nature Conservancy, adapted from USF&WS map

So, you might say that these reproducing Horseshoe Crabs, and the myriads of migratory shorebirds, share phenological calendars because they’re all looney.

RedKnot-onshore.NatureConservancy-MJKilpatrick

Red Knot on Beach, during Migratory Stopover
photo by The Nature Conservancy / M J Kilpatrick

What Happens To Birds In Hurricanes? – Repost

A Bird in the Storm ©Flickr Sam

A Bird in the Storm ©Flickr Sam

This story is from eNature’s Blog. Many of us worry about the birds and how they make it through Hurricanes like Matthew. This information is well worth repeating.

What Happens To Birds Caught In Hurricanes Like Matthew?

Hurricane Matthew is making its way towards the US East coast after hitting Haiti and Cuba with some of the highest sustained winds and rainfall totals in recent memory.

While Matthew’s wind, rain and storm surge will certainly affect many people, some folks are also wondering about the effects the hurricane may have on birds.

Numbers are hard to come by, but it’s clear that many birds are killed outright by hurricanes. This is especially true of seabirds, which have nowhere in which to seek shelter from these storms. Beaches may be littered with seabird carcasses following major storm events. Most Atlantic hurricanes occur in late summer and early fall—and fall storms coincide with bird migration and may disrupt migration patterns severely.

Many birds get caught up in storm systems and are blown far off course, often landing in inhospitable places or simply arriving too battered and weakened to survive. Others, while not killed or displaced by storms, may starve to death because they are unable to forage while the weather is poor. The number of birds that die as a result of a major hurricanes may run into the hundreds of thousands….

Read on for the whole story….

But as they sailed he fell asleep: and there came down a storm of wind on the lake; and they were filled with water, and were in jeopardy. (Luke 8:23 KJV)

Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they? (Matthew 6:26 KJV)

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Creation Moment’s – Do Birds Take A Sabbath Rest?

Kirtland's Warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii) ©USFWS

Kirtland’s Warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii) ©USFWS

“And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.” (Genesis 2:3)

Myles Willard is an avid bird watcher, award-winning nature photographer and long-time friend of Creation Moments. Myles has given us hundreds of breathtaking nature photos, one of which accompanies the printed transcript of today’s program at the Creation Moments website.

The reason I’m telling you about him today is because of an unexpected discovery he made while looking out the window of his home in Michigan. Each fall he meticulously tracks and logs the number of migrating warblers that stop by for a rest in the big cedar tree in his yard. After tracking the activity of over 1,500 warblers for 18 years, he was surprised to see a statistically significant dip in the number of birds stopping by that occurred on every seventh day!

From Article - Do Birds Take a Sabbath Rest ©Myles Willard

From Article – Do Birds Take a Sabbath Rest ©Myles Willard

Did these migrating birds have a built-in instinct that somehow made them follow the biblical principle of a Sabbath rest? We are not saying, of course, that the warblers were knowingly obeying God’s fourth commandment. However, if God worked for six days and then rested on the seventh, why would it be hard to believe that God gave these birds a cycle of six days of work followed by a seventh day of rest?

According to the account given in the book Inspired Evidence: Only One Designer, “It would seem that Myles Willard, science teacher, nature photographer and bird watcher, has found and documented such a pattern.”

Prayer:
Oh Lord, thank You for doing all the work necessary for our salvation so we can rest securely in the knowledge that – by grace through faith – we can have eternal life! Amen.
Notes:
Myles Willard, The Rest Is History, monograph, 2008. Cited in Inspired Evidence: Only One Reality by Julie Von Vett and Bruce Malone, April 29 (Search for the Truth Publications, 2012). Photo: One of Myles Willard’s superb photos. Used with permission.

Creation Moments ©2016 (Used with persmission)

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) Sleeping at Circle B by Lee

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) Sleeping at Circle B by Lee

Huh? Maybe this Great Blue Heron was off on his schedule. It was not taken on a Sunday, as we don’t go birdwatching on Sundays. We rest on Sunday and attend church, so, why wouldn’t the birds rest also? This article is very interesting. I am sure “evolutionists” would discount it, but those records that Myles kept, are worth considering, and I doubt he just made these statistics up.

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More Creation Moment Articles

Kirtlands Warbler Reveals…

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Unbelievable Migrations from Creation Moments

Artic Tern near Iceberg

Arctic Tern near Iceberg

Unbelievable Migrations from Creation Moments

“For the Son of man is as a man taking a far journey, who left his house, and gave authority to his servants, and to every man his work, and commanded the porter to watch.” Mark 13:34

If you have ever traveled to a distant city on vacation, you know how much planning you have to do before you leave. And, of course, you need to know where you are going and the route you must follow to get there. But the creatures we’ll be talking about today know exactly how to get where they are going. In fact, they were born with an internal GPS system to show them the way.

In his book, Billions of Missing Links, Dr. Geoffrey Simmons devotes an entire chapter to the topic of migration. He begins by telling how baby loggerhead turtles migrate 8,000 miles across the Atlantic Ocean. But that’s a short trip compared to the staggering 25,000 miles that arctic terns fly each year. That’s like flying completely around the Earth at the equator!

Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea) ©WikiC

Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea) ©WikiC

As Dr. Simmons points out, “Every species seems to know how to prepare for the arduous trip far in advance, but no one knows how they acquire the capability.” After describing all the preparations migrating birds must take care of, he writes: “One would think all these preparations had to have come as a whole package. There is way too much purposeful change for random mutations.”

How true! And even though Dr. Simmons is not a creationist, we have come to the exact same conclusion – namely, that animal migrations could not have come about slowly by trial and error, as Darwinian theory would have us believe.

Prayer:
Oh Lord, though I may get lost while going on a long trip, Your creatures never seem to lose their way. You have boggled my mind once again! Amen.

Notes:
Geoffrey Simmons, M.D., Billions of Missing Links, pp. 165-169 (Harvest House Publishers, 2007).

©Creation Moments, 2016

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Previous articles about the Arctic Tern:

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Swallow-tailed Kites In The Area Again

Swallow-tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus) ©Flickr Lawrence Crovo

Swallow-tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus) ©Flickr Lawrence Crovo

And God created great whales, and every living creature that moveth, which the waters brought forth abundantly, after their kind, and every winged fowl after his kind: and God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let fowl multiply in the earth. (Genesis 1:21-22 KJV)

But these are they of which ye shall not eat: the eagle, and the ossifrage, and the ospray, And the glede, and the kite, and the vulture after his kind, (Deuteronomy 14:12-13 KJV)

Our Swallow-tailed Kite has been written about several times, but they are just so pretty to watch. Again, today, we had one fly out over us and make a turn which showed the split in the tail. We have very few photos of them, because they are almost a “now you see them, now you don’t” kind of bird. They just come out of no where, there they are, and then they are gone. But, OH!, when they come out, they are so neat to behold.

Our Lord, when He created this bird, within its kind, sure put some beauty and gracefulness within this Kite. These birds belong to the Accipitridae Family of Kites, Hawks, and Eagles. Basically, they are one of the Birds of Prey. They are more dangerous to flying “large insects, such as grasshoppers, crickets; small birds and eggs; and small mammals including bats. It has been observed to regularly consume fruit in Central America. It drinks by skimming the surface and collecting water in its beak.” (Wikipedia)

Swallow-tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus) ©WikiC

Swallow-tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus) ©WikiC

Let them praise the name of the LORD: for he commanded, and they were created. (Psalms 148:5 KJV)

Here is how All About Birds describe them: “The lilting Swallow-tailed Kite has been called “the coolest bird on the planet.” With its deeply forked tail and bold black-and-white plumage, it is unmistakable in the summer skies above swamps of the Southeast. Flying with barely a wingbeat and maneuvering with twists of its incredible tail, it chases dragonflies or plucks frogs, lizards, snakes, and nestling birds from tree branches. After rearing its young in a treetop nest, the kite migrates to wintering grounds in South America.” (emphasis mine)

Swallow-tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus) ©WikiC

Swallow-tailed Kite (Elanoides forficatus) ©WikiC

For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: And he is before all things, and by him all things consist. (Colossians 1:16-17 KJV)

Just wanted to show them again so friends here in Florida and other southern states might keep their eyes to the sky. They are back, for a few months and then they will feel the call of South America and elsewhere south of here. The Lord put within the desire to migrate. So, enjoy them while you can.

now you see them, now you don’t

Here is a small slideshow of Swallow-tailed Kites:

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Previous articles:

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Creation Moment’s – Great Travelers Have Great Stories To Tell

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by Nikhil Devasar

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by Nikhil Devasar

GREAT TRAVELERS HAVE GREAT STORIES TO TELL

“Now they which were scattered abroad upon the persecution that arose about Stephen traveled as far as Phoenicia, and Cyprus, and Antioch….” (Acts 11:19a)

Those who widely travel usually have interesting experiences to talk about. That is no less true of animals that migrate. A commonly known example is the monarch butterfly. In the fall, monarchs from all over North America head south to the same small patch of jungle trees in Mexico. Even more astonishing is that each generation finds this exact traditional wintering spot but has never been there before.

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by Ian

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by Ian

Scientists have recently discovered that another migrating creature has an even more interesting story to tell. Bar-tailed Godwits, shorebirds with a wingspan of about 12 to 16 inches, summer in Alaska. But they winter in New Zealand, over 7,000 miles away. As you mentally picture their route, you would be right to notice that there are very few places to stop and rest between Alaska and New Zealand. Researchers outfitted seven female godwits with tracking devices to learn more about their migration. They found that the godwits traveled the distance nonstop, without rest or even food or water. That’s the equivalent of a nonstop flight from London to Los Angeles, plus 1,000 miles more!

Godwits glorify God as Creator with their amazing migratory paths. As the first Christians scattered across the Roman Empire in fear of persecution and martyrdom, they spread the wonder of God’s love for us in the Gospel of salvation.

Prayer:
Father, I thank You for the glory of Your creation, but I rejoice in the wonder of Your love and salvation. Amen.

Notes:
Science News, 11/22/08, p. 14, Laura Sanders, “Nonstop godwit flights.”
©Creation Moments 2016


Lee’s Addition:

What an amazing Creator that gives these Godwits the ability to make that 7,000 mile journey NON STOP! Wow!

Godwits are in the Scolopacidae Family of the Charadriiformes Order

Bar-tailed Godwit’s Self – Control.. by ajmithra

Wordless Birds
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The Long Christmas Journey

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Oleg Sidorenko

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Oleg Sidorenko

The Long Christmas Journey

~ by Emma Foster

Once there were two birds who lived in Portland, Oregon. Their names were Belinda and Steven and they were pigeons (a.k.a. Rock Doves).

Belinda and Steven lived on top of a stop-and-go light in the middle of a busy street where they had built their nest. They loved the city life so they didn’t mind all of the cars driving by, especially when they honked. They also didn’t mind all of the headlights that lit up the streets at night. Every day, Steven would fly through the city to search for food. And every day lots of cars would drive by.

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Edward Townend

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Edward Townend

As December drew near, it started to get colder. Eventually, snow started to fall. The more snow fell, the colder it became.

Belinda and Steven decided it was time for them to fly down south for the winter. They would spend Christmas down there just as they did every year. They both liked spending Christmas down where it was warm.

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Andrey

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Andrey

They started flying early the next morning because it was going to be a long journey to fly down south. As Belinda and Steven travelled, they were careful to not fly too high when they flew through the mountains because the tops of the mountains were cold and snowy. They flew past many mountains because Belinda and Steven were flying through the Rocky Mountains.

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Ingrid Taylar

Eventually, after several hours, Belinda and Steven reached Death Valley. It was nice and warm there. But Death Valley was a little too warm for them. Fortunately there was a group of road runners that gave them directions to Arizona. Belinda and Steven were already in eastern California so it wasn’t that long of a flight to get there.

Belinda and Steven were able to fly to Arizona and made it there by Christmas Eve. It was nice and warm and the desert was filled with cactuses. Belinda and Steven decorated a cactus with some Christmas decorations they had brought with them so the cactus looked festive.

Together, Belinda and Steven had a wonderful Christmas, and they didn’t even mind that it would still be a long trip back to Oregon. They would have to come back to Arizona next year.

The End

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Ken Slade

Rock Dove (Columba livia) ©Flickr Ken Slade


Lee’s Addition:

Storks, doves, swallows, and thrushes all know when it’s time to fly away for the winter and when to come back. But you, my people, don’t know what I demand. (Jeremiah 8:7 CEV)

Thanks, Emma, for telling us about your migrating Pigeon friends, Belinda and Steven. Smart birds for escaping the winter cold up there in the Northwest.

Keep up the great stories. We are all enjoying them and you a gaining quite a fan club. We are looking forward to more stories through this New Year. Happy New Year.

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See more of Emma Foster’s Stories

ABC’s of the Gospel

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