Child’s Book of Water Birds ~ The Goose

The Goose

Child's Book of Water Birds - Book Cover

Child’s Book of Water Birds – Book Cover

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Childs Bk of Water Birds titlebird

NEW YORK

LEAVITT & ALLEN.

1855.

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Welcome to the Updated Child’s Book of Water Birds, by Anonymous. It was written in 1855 and this is 2013. That is 158 years ago.

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Childs Bk of Water Birds goose

THE GOOSE.

The Goose is a very common bird. In Lincolnshire, England, enormous flocks are bred, containing from two to ten thousand each. They are subjected to the plucking of their wing-feathers periodically, in order to supply the demand for quills.

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Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) w brood ©USFWS

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) w brood ©USFWS

Update:

Today we use ballpoint pens and the Geese do not need to have their feathers plucked for quill pens. There are many Geese here in America and around the world.  They belong to the Ducks, Geese & Swan Family. Many local parks have geese of various kinds. They are larger than Ducks, but smaller than Swans,

The female is called a “goose” and the male is the “gander.” Some of the kinds of geese are: Barnacle, Cackling, Canada, Emperor, Nene, Ross’s and the Snow Goose.

Many geese, like the Snow Goose, have their chicks in summer in the northern parts of America and then fly south in the winter. They gather in huge flocks.

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Even the stork in the heavens knows her times, and the turtledove, swallow, and crane keep the time of their coming, but my people know not the rules of the LORD. (Jer 8:7 ESV)

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See the other five Child’s Book of Water Birds:

The Swan

The Coot

The Dabchick

The Teal

The Oyster Catcher

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Ducks, Geese & Swan Family.

Bible Birds

Wordless Birds

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Child's Book of Water Birds - Levit and Allen
*** PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK CHILD'S BOOK OF WATER BIRDS ***

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Child’s Book of Water Birds ~ The Teal

The Teal

Child's Book of Water Birds - Book Cover

Child’s Book of Water Birds – Book Cover

***

Childs Bk of Water Birds titlebird

NEW YORK

LEAVITT & ALLEN.

1855.

***

Welcome to the Updated Child’s Book of Water Birds, by Anonymous. It was written in 1855 and this is 2013. That is 158 years ago.

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Childs Bk of Water Birds teal

THE TEAL.

The Teal is the smallest of the ducks. The Green-winged Teal is the American. It feeds on fresh-water insects, seeds, and aquatic plants. When fat it is considered a great luxury. It is almost always seen on well furnished tables. It generally feeds at night. It flies very swiftly, and utters a whistling cry.

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Male Green-winged Teal at Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa, FL

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Update:

This dabbling duck (the Green-winged Teal) flies south in the winter and will form large flocks.

This is the smallest North American dabbling duck. The male has grey flanks and back, with a yellow rear end and a white-edged green feathers. It has a chestnut head with a green eye patch.  a vertical white stripe on side of breast. The females are light brown.

Green-winged Teal (Anas carolinensis) Pair ©WikiC

14 Green-winged Teal (Anas carolinensis) Pair ©WikiC

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It is a common duck of sheltered wetlands, usually feeds by dabbling for plant food or grazing.  It nests on the ground, near water and under cover.

This is a noisy species. The male has a clear whistle, whereas the female has a feeble “quack”.

We also have Blue-winged Teals and Cinnamon Teals here in America.

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See the other five Child’s Book of Water Birds:

The Swan

The Coot

The Dabchick

The Goose

The Oyster Catcher

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Green-winged Teal – WhatBird

Blue-winged Teal – WhatBird

Cinnamon Teal – WhatBird

Birdwatching Terms – Dabbling duck

Bible Birds

Wordless Birds

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Child's Book of Water Birds - Levit and Allen
*** PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK CHILD'S BOOK OF WATER BIRDS ***

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Child’s Book of Water Birds ~ The Dabchick

The Dabchick

Child's Book of Water Birds - Book Cover

Child’s Book of Water Birds – Book Cover

***

Childs Bk of Water Birds titlebird

NEW YORK

LEAVITT & ALLEN.

1855.

***

Welcome to the Updated Child’s Book of Water Birds, by Anonymous. It was written in 1855 and this is 2013. That is 158 years ago.

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Childs Bk of Water Birds dabchick

THE DABCHICK.

The Dabchick is a very timid bird, and when alarmed instantly dives, after which it is useless to look after the bird. It is easily domesticated, and is often seen placed as an ornament to ponds, where it swims about very merrily, and seems to enjoy a game of hide and seek with any one who is attempting to watch its movements.

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Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) by Nikhil Devasar

Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) by Nikhil Devasar

Update:

The Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis), also known as Dabchick, is a member of the Grebe family of water birds. At 9 to 11.4 in (23 to 29 cm) in length it is the smallest European member of its family. It is commonly found in open bodies of water across most of its range. Also, there is a New Zealand Grebe (Dabchick).

It is a small water bird with a pointed bill. In summer, the adult is dark above with its rich, rufous colour neck, cheeks and flanks (sides), and bright yellow gape (mouth). Non-breeding and juvenile birds are a dirty brownish grey.

It is an excellent swimmer and diver and chases its fish and aquatic prey underwater. It uses the vegetation skilfully as a hiding place.  it nests at the water’s edge, since its legs are set very far back and it cannot walk well. The young leave the nest and can swim soon after hatching, and chicks are often carried on the backs of the swimming adults.

If a bird’s nest should chance to be before you in the way, in any tree or on the ground, with young ones or eggs, and the mother bird is sitting on the young or on the eggs, you shall not take the mother bird with the young. (Deu 22:6 AMP)

The Little Grebe’s breeding call, given singly or in duet, is a trilled repeated weet-weet-weet or wee-wee-wee which sounds like a horse whinnying.

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See the other five Child’s Book of Water Birds:

The Swan

The Coot

The Teal

The Goose

The Oyster Catcher

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Grebe family

New Zealand Grebe (Dabchick)

Little Grebe – Wikipedia

Bible Birds

Wordless Birds

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Child's Book of Water Birds - Levit and Allen

Back Cover

*** PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK CHILD'S BOOK OF WATER BIRDS ***

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Child’s Book of Water Birds ~ The Coot

The Coot

Child's Book of Water Birds - Book Cover

Child’s Book of Water Birds – Book Cover

***

Childs Bk of Water Birds titlebird

NEW YORK

LEAVITT & ALLEN.

1855.

***
Welcome to the Updated Child’s Book of Water Birds, by Anonymous. It was written in 1855 and this is 2013. That is 158 years ago.
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Childs Bk of Water Birds coot

THE COOT.

The Coot is generally found in large sheets of water, particularly if shaded by trees. The nest is a mass of flags, reeds, and grass, usually at the water’s edge, but sometimes actually in the water. The Coot’s eggs are generally seven in number. They are of a greenish-white, spotted.

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American Coot (Fulica americana) by Lee at Lk Morton

American Coot (Fulica americana) by Lee at Lk Morton

Update:

Coots are medium-sized birds that belong to the Raillidae – Rail Family. There are twelve (12) different Coots around the world.

They have mostly black feathers and can be seen swimming in open water. Coots have prominent frontal shields or other decoration on the forehead, with red to dark red eyes and coloured bills. Many, but not all, have white on the under tail.

Coots eat plants, eggs and some small animals. The defend their nest when they have babies. A group of Coots are called a “covert” or  “cover.”

Like other rails, they have long, lobed toes that are well adapted to soft, uneven surfaces. Coots have strong legs and can walk and run fast. This video shows their feet.

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See the other five Child’s Book of Water Birds:

The Swan

The Dabchick

The Teal

The Goose

The Oyster Catcher

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Rallidae – Rails, Crakes & Coots Family

American Coot – All About Birds

Bible Birds

Wordless Birds

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Child's Book of Water Birds - Levit and Allen

Back Cover

*** PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK CHILD'S BOOK OF WATER BIRDS ***

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Child’s Book of Water Birds ~ The Swan

The Swan

Child's Book of Water Birds - Book Cover

Child’s Book of Water Birds – Book Cover

***

Childs Bk of Water Birds titlebird

NEW YORK

LEAVITT & ALLEN.

1855.

***

Welcome to the Updated Child’s Book of Water Birds, by Anonymous. It was written in 1855 and this is 2013. That is 158 years ago.

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Childs Bk of Water Birds swan

THE SWAN.

The Swan is a very beautiful bird. It is generally white, though a black swan has been discovered in Australia. It is not very often seen in this country. It was brought from Asia and Eastern Europe into England—from whence, most probably, a few specimens have been introduced into this country. The Swan is very graceful in the water, but on land it is an awkward waddler.

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Swan at Bok Tower

Swan at Bok Tower

Update:

Swans are the largest member of the Water Birds family Swans. They are also among the largest flying birds. Some Swans have a wingspan almost 10 ft (3 m).

A group of swans is called a bevy or a wedge in flight. Swans feed in the water and on land.

The nest is on the ground near water. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 4.4 X 2.9 in (113×74 mm), weighing 11 oz (340 g), in a clutch size of 4 to 7. Swans are very protective of their nest.

The Swan is one of the Bible Birds. (See Bible Birds – Swans)

And the swan, and the pelican, and the gier eagle, (Leviticus 11:18 KJV)

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See the other five Child’s Book of Water Birds:

The Coot

The Dabchick

The Teal

The Goose

The Oyster Catcher

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Anatidae – Swan Family

Bible Birds – Swans

Bible Birds

Wordless Birds

 

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Child's Book of Water Birds - Levit and Allen
*** PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK CHILD'S BOOK OF WATER BIRDS ***

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Vol 2, #6 – The Ring-necked Pheasant

Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) "Ring-necked" for Birds Illustrated

Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) “Ring-necked” for Birds Illustrated

From col. Chi. Acad. Sciences. Copyrighted by
Nature Study Pub. Co., 1897, Chicago.

THE RING-NECKED PHEASANT.

(RELOCATED – CLICK HERE)

Birds of the Bible – Prayer

Sandhill Cranes with "Colts"

Sandhill Cranes with “Colts”

“Ah, Soul, God does listen to the chattering of cranes! I know He does, for I have read in His Word what is tantamount to that in the text [Isaiah 38:14],

Like a crane or a swallow, so did I chatter: I did mourn as a dove: mine eyes fail with looking upward: O LORD, I am oppressed; undertake for me. (Isaiah 38:14 KJV)

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Kent Nickell

Northern Raven (Corvus corax) by Kent Nickell

“He hears the young ravens when they cry.”

And surely if He hears a raven’s cry and if not a sparrow falls to the ground without our Father, your prayer, though it may be very indistinct and the language, itself, may be very unworthy of the Divine ear, yet it shall command an audience and will bring down a blessing from above!”

American Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) w chicks ©USFWS

American Tree Sparrow (Spizella arborea) w chicks ©USFWS

Above is a quote from C. H. Spurgeon’s Notable Quotes: —Volume 61, Sermon #3468

 Give ear to my words, O LORD, consider my meditation. Hearken unto the voice of my cry, my King, and my God: for unto thee will I pray. My voice shalt thou hear in the morning, O LORD; in the morning will I direct my prayer unto thee, and will look up. (Psalms 5:1-3 KJV)

See all the:

Birds of the Bible

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Herons – Color Key to North American Birds, by Frank M. Chapman

Herons

Color Key to North American Birds, by Frank M. Chapman, 2011

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Ardeidae – Herons, Bitterns, Egrets Family

Herons

the stork, the heron of any kind, the hoopoe, and the bat. (Leviticus 11:19 ESV)

All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made. (John 1:3 NKJV)

Color Key To North American Birds cover

Bird Images pg_092192. Great White Heron (Ardea occidentalis). Ads. White, no “aigrette” plumes. A white Heron about the size of a Great Blue Heron. What is supposed to be a gray-blue phase of this bird has been called, a bird which resembles No. 194, but has the head and neck whitish.Range.—Southern Florida, Cuba and Jamaica.

196. American Egret (Herodias egretta). L. 41. Ads. White, about 50 straight “aigrette” plumes grow from the back between the wings; legs and feet black. Ads. when not breeding and Yng., the same, but no plumes.Range.—Tropical and temperate America; breeds north to Virginia, southern Illinois, and California; later strays to New Brunswick, Minnesota, and Oregon; winters from southern California and Gulf States southward.

197. Snowy Heron (Egretta candidissima). L. 24. Ads. White, about 50 recurved “aigrette” plumes grow from back between the wings; legs black, feet yellow. Ads. when not breeding and Yng. The same, but no plumes.Range.—Tropical and temperate America; bred formerly north to Long Island, southern Illinois and California; now very rare in eastern North America; winters from Gulf States and southern California southward.

194. Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias). L. 45; W. 18.5; B. 5.5; Tar. 7. Ads. Center of crown white, head crested; legs blackish. Yng. Similar, but no crest, crown wholly black, plumage more streaked.Range—Northern South America north to Arctic regions; breeds locally throughout most of North America range; winters from about latitude 42° southward.

194a. Northwest Coast Heron (A. h. fannini). Similar to No. 194 but much darker; upperparts bluish slate black; tarsus shorter, 5.3.Range.—Pacific coast from Vancouver to Sitka.

194b. Ward Heron (A. h. wardi). Similar to No. 194 but whiter below, neck darker; legs olive; larger, L. 52; W. 20; B. 6.5; Tar. 8.Range.—Florida; coast of Texas.

202. Black-crowned Night Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax nævius). L. 24. Ads. Crown and back greenish black lower back, wings and tail ashy; head with two or three rounded white plumes, except just after breeding season. Yng. Grayish brown streaked with white; below white streaked with blackish; outer webs of primaries, pale rufousNotes. An explosiveqûawk.Range.—Western hemisphere; breeds in North America north to New Brunswick, Quebec, Manitoba, and Oregon; winters from California and Gulf States southward.

203. Yellow-crowned Night Heron (Nyctanassa violaceus). L. 23. Ads. Blue-gray; crown and ear-coverts whitish, rest of head black; scapulars streaked with black; head with two or three rounded, white plumes, except just after nesting season.Yng. Crown black, streaked with whitish; primaries bluish slate, no rufous; back brownish streaked with white; below whitish streaked with blackish.

Range.—Tropical and subtropical America; breeds north to South Carolina, southern Illinois, and Lower California; strays to Massachusetts and Colorado; winters from Gulf States southward.

198. Reddish Egret (Dichromanassa rufescens). L. 29. Two color phases independent of age. Ads. Dark phase, Head and neck rufous; back slate; about 30 “aigrette” plumes. White phase. White, including plumes; tips of primaries sometimes speckled with gray. Yng. Rufous and gray, or white, without plumes.Range.—West Indies and Central America north to coasts of Gulf States, Illinois (rarely), and Lower California.

199. Louisiana Heron (Hydranassa tricolor ruficollis). L. 26. Ads. “Aigrette” plumes, short, dirty gray; rump and belly white; legs blackish. Yng. Head and neck brownish; throat and line down foreneck white; above slaty washed with brownish, rump, and belly white.Range.—West Indies and Central America north to Gulf States, casually to Long Island and Indiana.

200. Little Blue Heron (Florida cœrulea). L. 22. Ads. Head and neck maroon; rest of plumage slaty blue. Yng. White, tips of primaries bluish, legs greenish yellow.Range.—Tropical America and eastern United States; breeds north to Virginia and Illinois, later may stray north as far as Nova Scotia; winters from South Atlantic and Gulf States southward.

201. Little Green Heron (Butorides virescens). L. 17. Smallest of our Herons. Ads. Crown, glossy green-black; throat and line down foreneck buffy; rest of head and neck purplish chestnut; back green washed with bluish gray. Yng. Neck and below streaked with blackish; back-feathers not lengthened; duller. Notes. A rattling oc-oc-oc-oc-oc, a startling scow, and, more rarely, a deep, hollow groan. (Brewster.)Range.—Tropical and temperate North America; breeds from Gulf States north to Nova Scotia and Manitoba; winters from Gulf States southward to northern South America.

201a. Frazar Green Heron (B. v. frazari). Similar to No. 201, but rather larger and darker, neck more purplish, light stripings on throat and foreneck more restricted. (Brewster.)

201b. Anthony Green Heron (B. v. anthonyi). Similar to No. 201, but slightly larger, and paler, light markings of wings, neck, and throat less restricted and whiter. (Mearns.)

Range.—Arid portions of southwestern United States, south into Mexico.


Green Heron – From Color Key

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Birds Illustrated By Color Photography – Volume II Indroduction

BIRDS

A MONTHLY SERIAL

ILLUSTRATED BY COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY

DESIGNED TO PROMOTE

KNOWLEDGE OF BIRD-LIFE


VOLUME II.


CHICAGO  Nature Study Publishing Company


copyright, 1897 by

Nature Study Publishing Co.

chicago.


INTRODUCTION.

This is the second volume of a series intended to present, in accurate colored portraiture, and in popular and juvenile biographical text, a very considerable portion of the common birds of North America, and many of the more interesting and attractive specimens of other countries, in many respects superior to all other publications which have attempted the representation of birds, and at infinitely less expense. The appreciative reception by the public of Vol. I deserves our grateful acknowledgement. Appearing in monthly parts, it has been read and admired by thousands of people, who, through the life-like pictures presented, have made the acquaintance of many birds, and have since become enthusiastic observers of them. It has been introduced into the public schools, and is now in use as a text book by hundreds of teachers, who have expressed enthusiastic approval of the work and of its general extension. The faithfulness to nature of the pictures, in color and pose, have been commended by such ornithologists and authors as Dr. Elliott Coues, Mr. John Burroughs, Mr. J. W. Allen, editor of The Auk, Mr. Frank M. Chapman, Mr. J. W. Baskett, and others.

The general text of Birds—the biographies—has been conscientiously prepared from the best authorities by a careful observer of the feather-growing denizens of the field, the forest, and the shore, while the juvenile autobiographies have received the approval of the highest ornithological authority.

The publishers take pleasure in the announcement that the general excellence of Birds will be maintained in subsequent volumes. The subjects selected for the third and fourth volumes—many of them—will be of the rare beauty in which the great Audubon, the limner par excellence of birds, would have found “the joy of imitation.”

Nature Study Publishing Company.


BIRDS.

Illustrated by COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY.

Vol. II.   No. 1.   JULY, 1897.


Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by Lee

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) by Lee

Lee’s Addition:

This second volume does not have a cover photo for each month like Volume I did. They apparently changed their format. Also, there are no old time advertisements. These were reproduced through Gutenberg Project.

Will be posting the different birds soon. See Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisted.

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Birds Vol 1 #1 – The Red-Rumped Tanager (Scarlet-Rumped or ?)

Red-Rumped Tanager

Red-Rumped Tanager

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

Vol 1. January, 1897 No. 1

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THE RED-RUMPED TANAGER.

(RELOCATED – CLICK HERE)

 

Birds Vol 1 #1 – The Yellow Throated or (Black-mandibled) Toucan

Black-mandibled Toucan (Ramphastos ambiguus) for the Birds Illustrated article

Yellow Throated Toucan for the Birds Illustrated article

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

Vol 1. January, 1897 No. 1

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THE YELLOW THROATED TOUCAN

(Ramphastos ambiguus) or Black-mandibled) Toucan

(RELOCATED – CLICK HERE)