Sunday Inspiration – Cardinalidae Wrap-up

Blackish-blue Seedeater (Amaurospiza moesta) ©WikiC

Blackish-blue Seedeater (Amaurospiza moesta) ©WikiC

And when he sowed, some seeds fell by the way side, and the fowls came and devoured them up: (Matthew 13:4 KJV)

Last week, the first half of the Cardinalidae was presented, and now here is the rest of this beautiful family. Today we have Grosbeaks, Seedeaters, Saltators, a Dickcissel, and Buntings. You will see another display of the Lord’s Handiwork as you watch the slideshow.

The beginning genera have only a few species, the latter ones have more species per genus. Enjoy!

Black-headed Saltator (Saltator atriceps) ©WikiC

Black-headed Saltator (Saltator atriceps) ©WikiC

“Saltator is a genus of songbirds of the Americas. They are traditionally placed in the cardinal family (Cardinalidae) but now seem to be closer to tanagers (Thraupidae). Their English name is also saltator, except for two dark species known by the more general grosbeak.

Saltator is Latin for “leaper” or “dancer”. Louis Vieillot applied it to this genus because of the heavy way the birds hop on the ground.” (Wikipedia)

PAS-Card Dickcissel (Spiza americana) ©WikiC
Dickcissels have a large pale bill, a yellow line over the eye, brownish upperparts with black streaks on the back, dark wings, a rust patch on the shoulder and light underparts. Adult males have a black throat patch, a yellow breast and grey cheeks and crown. This head and breast pattern is especially brilliant in the breeding plumage, making it resemble an eastern meadowlark. Females and juveniles are brownish on the cheeks and crown and are somewhat similar in appearance to house sparrows; they have streaked flanks.

Glaucous-blue Grosbeak (Cyanoloxia glaucocaerulea) ©WikiC

Glaucous-blue Grosbeak (Cyanoloxia glaucocaerulea) ©WikiC

The Glaucous-blue Grosbeak (Cyanoloxia glaucocaerulea), also known as the indigo grosbeak, is a species of bird in the Cardinalidae family. It is the only member of the genus Cyanoloxia. It is found in Argentina, Brazil, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist shrubland, and heavily degraded former forest.

Painted Bunting Subspecies (Passerina ciris ciris) ©WikiC

Painted Bunting Subspecies (Passerina ciris ciris) ©WikiC

The genus Passerina is a group of birds in the cardinal family (Cardinalidae). Although not directly related to buntings in the family Emberizidae, they are sometimes known as the North American buntings (the North American Emberizidae are colloquially called “sparrows” although they are also not related to these birds).

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) Female ©WikiC Dan_Pancamo

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) Female ©WikiC Dan_Pancamo

The males show vivid colors in the breeding season; the plumage of females and immature birds is duller. These birds go through two molts in a year; the males are generally less colorful in winter. They have short tails and short slim legs. They have smaller bills than other Cardinalidae; they mainly eat seeds in winter and insects in summer. (Wikipedia)

With this last group, we have now completed the PASSERIFORMES – Passerines Order. As mentioned last week, there are 131 families of song birds that you have been viewing since February of this year.

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And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely. (Revelation 21:6 KJV)

“Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” ~ Choir and Orchestra

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More Sunday Inspirations

Sunday Inspiration – Cardinalidae – Family of Cardinals Plus

Cardinalidae – Cardinals, Grosbeaks and allies

PASSERIFORMES – Passerines

Wordless Birds

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Sunday Inspiration – Cardinalidae Family of Cardinals Plus

Northern Cardinal M-F ©BackyardBirdLover

Northern Cardinal M-F ©BackyardBirdLover

Wherefore art thou red in thine apparel, and thy garments like him that treadeth in the winefat? (Isaiah 63:2 KJV)

Today, you are being introduced to the Cardinalidae Family, which is the last family, in taxonomy order, of the Passeriformes Order. Since February 1, 2016, we began the journey with the first four families in More Amazing Birds. Now we have arrived at the last of the 131 families of this order. I trust you have enjoyed the journey through these many Sundays. Hopefully you have been blessed by the great variety of Avian Wonders from our Lord, their Creator. The Passeriformes Order contains well over half of all the birds in the world; around 6,000 plus of the 10,659 species on the latest update. (6.3)

The Cardinalidae – Cardinals, Grosbeaks and allies has 69 species in the family. Because of that number, this family will be presented in two segments. Growing up in Indiana, the Northern Cardinal was a favorite of most of us. It is the “State Bird” of Indiana along with six other states. [Illinois, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia] The family members are found in North and South America. The South America Cardinals of the genus Paroaria are placed in another family, the Thraupidae (previously placed in Emberizidae). Even though the family name is Cardinalidae, there are only two “cardinals” among the members.

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) ©WikiC

Lazuli Bunting (Passerina amoena) ©WikiC

Also known as cardinal-grosbeaks and cardinal-buntings, this family’s members “are robust, seed-eating birds with strong bills. The family ranges in size from the 12-cm (4.7-in), 11.5-g (0.40-oz) and up orange-breasted bunting to the 25-cm (9.8-in), 85-g (2.99-oz) black-headed saltator. They are typically associated with open woodland. The sexes usually have distinctive appearances. The northern cardinal type species was named by colonists for the male’s red crest, reminiscent of a Catholic cardinal’s biretta.

The ‘North American buntings’ are known as such to distinguish them from buntings. The name ‘cardinal-grosbeak’ can also apply to this family as a whole.”(Wikipedia)

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea) by Kent Nickell

The family starts off with 11 Tanagers in the Piranga genus, which used to be in with the tanagers, but were relocated here recently. “They are essentially red, orange or yellow all over, except the tail and wings and in some species also the back. Such extensive lipochrome coloration (except on the belly) is very rare in true tanagers, but is widespread among the Cardinalidae in the Piranga genus.

These songbirds are found high in tree canopies, and are not very gregarious in their breeding areas. Piranga species pick insects from leaves, or sometimes in flight. They will also take some fruit. Several species are migratory, breeding in North America and wintering in the tropics.”

Red-throated Ant Tanager (Habia fuscicauda) by Michael Woodruff

Red-throated Ant Tanager (Habia fuscicauda) by Michael Woodruff

Next are the Ant Tanagers in the Habia genus. “These are long-tailed and strong billed birds. The males have a red crest and plumage containing red, brown or sooty hues. Females may resemble the males or be largely yellowish or brown in colour.” Following these are four more tanagers in the Chlorothraupis genus. These are the last of the tanagers that were moved to this family.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) by Rob Fry

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) by Rob Fry

The next genus, Pheucitcus has six Grosbeaks.  Typical of the genus, they lay two to five pale bluish to greenish eggs with heavy brown and gray speckling. The cup nest is built at medium height in a bush or small tree.” (Wikipedia)

Red-breasted Chat (Granatellus venustus) ©WikiC

There are three Chats in the Granatellus genus; Red-breasted Chat, Grey-throated Chat, and the Rose-breasted Chat. They range from North America through Central America into northern South America. Their natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests.

Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus) ©Flickr Don Faulkner

Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus) ©Flickr Don Faulkner

We will finish this first half of the family with three of my favorites, the Cardinalis genus. Our Northern and Vermilion Cardinals and the Pyrrholixia (which I saw for the first time last year) are hard to miss with their bright set of feathers the Lord provided for them. These range across North America and into northern South America.

“He answered and said unto them, When it is evening, ye say, It will be fair weather: for the sky is red.” (Matthew 16:2 KJV)

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“Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” (Isaiah 1:18 KJV)

“Written in Red” – Faith Baptist Choir and Orchestra

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil. (John 3:16-19 KJV)

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More Sunday Inspirations

Sunday Inspiration – More Amazing Birds

PASSERIFORMES – Passerines

Cardinalidae – Cardinals, Grosbeaks and allies

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Birds Vol 1 #1 – Nonpareil – Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) - Drawing

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) – Drawing

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

Vol 1. January, 1897 No. 1

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THE NONPAREIL

(RELOCATED – CLICK HERE)

 

Birds of the World – Vermilion Cardinal

Vermilion Cardinal (Cardinalis phoeniceus) ©WikiC

Vermilion Cardinal (Cardinalis phoeniceus) ©WikiC

Why is Your apparel red, And Your garments like one who treads in the winepress? (Isaiah 63:2 NKJV)

The Cardinalis genus of the Cardinalidae – Grosbeaks, Saltators & Allies Family includes three species. Oswaldtanager of YouTube caught a great video of the Vermilion Cardinal (Cardinalis phoeniceus) and I wanted to share it. These are only found in  Colombia and Venezuela.

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Here in the United States, we get to see the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)

Northern Cardinal by Aestheticphotos

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) by Aestheticphotos

and the Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus). These are the other two genus members.

Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus) ©WikiC

Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus) ©WikiC

These are robust, seed-eating birds with strong bills. They are typically associated with open woodland. The sexes usually have distinctive appearances; the family is named for the red plumage (colored cardinal like the color of a Catholic cardinal’s vestments) of males of the type species, the Northern Cardinal.

The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds found in North and South America. The South American cardinals in the genus Paroaria are placed in another family, the Emberizidae.

Paroaria
Red-crested Cardinal (Paroaria coronata) by DavesBP – Video
Red-cowled Cardinal (Paroaria dominicana)– Video 
Red-capped Cardinal (Paroaria gularis) by DavesBP-Video by Keith
Masked Cardinal (Paroaria nigrogenis)
Crimson-fronted Cardinal (Paroaria baeri)
Yellow-billed Cardinal (Paroaria capitata) – Video

And they stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him. (Matthew 27:28 NKJV)

See:

Birds of the World

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The Inspired and the Inspiring Rose-breasted Grosbeak

The Inspired and the Inspiring Rose-breasted Grosbeak – by a j mithra

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) by Rob Fry

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) by Rob Fry

The Rose-Breasted Grosbeak lives and breeds in North America, but then migrates to Mexico and Central America. East of the Great Plains, the deciduous woodlands belong to the rose-breasted grosbeak with its colossal white bill, an appendage that is often stained with wild berry juice.

This bird is considered as the most stunningly dressed of all our Neotropical migrants.Yet the “rosebird” of olden days is heard more often than seen as it flies through the forest penthouse, whistling and if inspired, it may sing all night. Who is our inspiration?

When JESUS becomes our inspiration, we cannot but sing 24×7….
Why is it hard for us to praise HIM at all times? Is it because we don’t love HIM the way HE does?
Why is it not possible for us to say like David?
Just think!

I will bless the LORD at all times: his praise shall continually be in my mouth. (Psalm 34:1)

Rose-breasted grosbeak nests are so loosely built that it is sometimes possible to count the eggs from below. The parent birds share incubation duties and the male Rose-breasted Grosbeak participates in incubation of the eggs, accounting for about 1/3 of the time during the day, the female incubates over night….

The female bird incubates overnight?
Do we understand what the bird seems to teach us about its overnight incubation?
We feel so nice to call ourselves as the bride.. Isn’t it?
But, the question is, does the church – the so called bride, watch and pray for the lost?

Ye are all the children of light, and the children of the day: we are not of the night, nor of darkness. Therefore let us not sleep, as do others; but let us watch and be sober. (1Thessalonians 5:5,6)

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) by Quy Tran

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) by Quy Tran

The male will care for the fledglings while the female starts a second nest. She becomes so possessive of a good mate that other females vying for his attention will be driven away. Both sexes sing quietly to each other when they exchange places. The male will sing his normal song while near or actually on the nest. The female song is generally a simplified version of the male song. Occasionally, the female sings full “male” song, apparently to deceive its mate about the presence of intruders and force him to spend more time at the nest..

Our worship has the power to force JESUS to spend more time with us…
It is easy to praise God when we are in the comfort zone, but singing in times of trouble, not only brings HIS presence, but also deliverance…
After all, our LORD dwells among the praises of the angels in heaven…
Remember, HIS presence is the essence of life…

But thou art holy, O thou that inhabitest the praises of Israel. (Psalm 22:3)
Let every thing that hath breath praise the LORD. Praise ye the LORD.” (Psalm 150:6)

Have a blessed day!

Your’s in YESHUA,
a j mithra

Please visit us at: Crosstree


Lee’s Addition:

The Grosbeaks are in the Cardinalidae Family of the Passeriformes Order. In fact, the Family is the last one in the Passeriformes order. The 45 members of the family include not only the Grosbeaks (17), but the Dickcissel (1), Chats (3), Cardinals (2), Pyrrhuloxia (1), Saltators (14), Buntings (7).

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