Houston Zoo – Vacation – Part 2-B

You were shown the Blue-chinned Macaws and five different Turacos in Houston Zoo – Vacation – Part 2. Now to show you some more of the neat birds from the Lord’s Creative Hand.

The next set of birds were outside and most were still damp from the rain.

Grey-winged Trumpeter and Racquet-tailed Rollers Exhibit

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Grey-winged Trumpeter’s Beautiful Feathers Houston Zoo by Lee

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Racket-tailed Roller (Coracias spatulatus) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

Racket-tailed Roller (Coracias spatulatus) Houston Zoo by Lee

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I kept trying to get a photo of the “racket-tail”, but he never really got in the right position. This was a new species to see for me.

Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

Guira Cuckoo (Guira guira) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

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Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus curvirostris) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

Chestnut-breasted Malkoha (Phaenicophaeus curvirostris) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Lee

We have seen both the Cuckoos and the Malkohas before, but the Cuckoos were closer to us this time.

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Then a couple of favorites, the Kookabura, except this time it was a Blue-winged Kookabura, and a Micronesian Kingfisher.

Micronesian Kingfisher by Dan

Micronesian Kingfisher by Dan

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Blue-winged Kookaburra – What you looking at?  by Lee

Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Dan

Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii) Houston Zoo 5-6-15 by Dan

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** Updated 6/27/15 **

Forgot about this video:

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Kookaburra Encounter

Laughing Kookabura by Dan

Laughing Kookabura by Dan

On our vacation several weeks ago we stopped back by the Brevard Zoo in Melbourne, Florida.  I had a neat Kookaburra Encounter.

Lee with Laughing Kookabura at Brevard Zoo by Dan

Lee with Laughing Kookabura at Brevard Zoo by Dan

The Laughing Kookaburra is in the aviary where the Lorikeets, Galahs and other birds are kept. When I came through a door, right there on the rail sat a young Laughing Kookaburra. I have seen them before, but never as close as this one. I got within inches of him/or her. I could have touched it, but was afraid of that beak.

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. (Genesis 1:21 NKJV)

Here are some of the pictures we took.

Lee very close to Kookabura by Dan

Lee very close to Kookabura by Dan

I have to admit, I was thrilled. Just looking at one of the Lord’s creations so close. Wow! That one photo Dan took of me and the Kookaburra, my hand was within 5-6 inches from it. May I never lose my AWE at seeing and encountering the Lord’s critters.

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Other Kookaburra encounters:
Birdwatching at the Cincinnati Zoo I
Birds Of The Bible – Joy And Laughter
Birdwatching Adventure to Brevard Zoo in Viera, FL
Birdwatching at the National Aviary – Introduction
Alcedinidae – Kingfishers – Family

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Birdwatching at the Cincinnati Zoo I

Cincinnati Zoo from Phone

Cincinnati Zoo from Phone

“Remember to magnify His work, Of which men have sung. (Job 36:24 NKJV)

Yesterday, we had the pleasure of checking out more birds of the Lord’s creation at the Cincinnati Zoo. The weather and the temperature were great and the birds were quite content to let us watch and photograph them. It has been over 45 years ago since we visited this zoo. Needless to say, it has changed and the most striking was their beautiful landscaping throughout the zoo.

Statue at the entrance to the Wings of the World exhibit.

Statue at the entrance to the Wings of the World exhibit.

When we arrived at the Wings of the World area, We were greeted by several birds and a neat statute of a child holding a bird. This shows how some of the landscaping was used around the zoo.

Statue at Wings of the World exhibit. Close-up

Statue at Wings of the World exhibit. Close-up

Wings of the World Aviary is divided into several different habitats and types of birds.

Wings of the World Aviary - Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13

Wings of the World Aviary – Cincinnati Zoo

As you enter, you are greeted by Macaws, Screamers and a Laughing Kookaburra.

Southern Screamer

Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13 by Lee

Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

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Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13 by Lee

Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) by Lee

Macaws

Dan photographing the MaCaws Cincinnati Zoo

Dan photographing the MaCaws Cincinnati Zoo

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Parrots - McCaws by Lee

Parrots – McCaws by Lee

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Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13 by Lee

Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) by Lee

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Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13

Blue-and-yellow Macaw (Ara ararauna) Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

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Scarlet and Blue-and-yellow Macaws by Lee

Scarlet and Blue-and-yellow Macaws by Lee

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Scarlet and Blue-and-yellow Macaw

Scarlet and Blue-and-yellow Macaw

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Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

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Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Lee Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Lee

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Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Lee Cincinnati Zoo 9-5-13

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Lee

This is just the beginning of our visit to the Cincinnati Zoo. Look for more articles about some really neat birds like a Mousebird, Bee-eater, Bishop, Penguins, Murres and more.

Also:
Anhimidae – Screamers Family

Psittacidae – Parrots Family

Alcedinidae – Kingfishers Family

Cincinnati Zoo

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Laughing Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Laughing Kookaburra ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter  – 01/23/11

The Blue-winged Kookaburra has featured as bird of the week (twice) but, as far as I can detect, the iconic Laughing Kookaburra hasn’t, so let’s correct that using library photos. Bird photo opportunities were time-constrained during the wonderful recorder course in Armidale, NSW, though a family of roosting Southern Boobooks (which featured as bird of the week last year) gave the participants much pleasure and I’ll let you know when I’ve put the photos on the website.

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Its loud cackling call is a characteristic sound of the Australian landscape (and of the sound tracks of B-grade jungle movies not set in Australia) and it’s a familiar bird in southern and eastern Australia, first photo.

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Up to 47cm/18.5in in length, it’s larger than its blue-winged cousin (length to 40cm) and by far the largest Australian Kingfisher. Unlike male blue-winged, birds of both sexes have brown tails and are not easily told apart. The third photo shows a breeding pair of Laughing Kookaburras, photographed near their nest site in a tree hollow in the botanic gardens (the Palmetum) in Townsville.

Older males can, however, be distinguished by having bluish rumps,  like one making his presence very audible in the third photo. Kookaburras are very territorial and defend their territories by having calling matches and by performing circular display flights as far as the boundary of the territory. A territorial group consists of either just a breeding pair or a dominant breeding pair and several ‘helper’ birds so the calling matches can be very noisy indeed when everyone takes part.
Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Juvenile birds are recognisable by the pale brownish scalloped edges to the plumage, most noticeable on the back like the right hand bird in the fourth photo. This bird is barely fledged and has a very short tail.

Kookaburras are carnivorous and they hunt from perches, doing long glides down to catch terrestrial prey, typically large insects and small mammals and reptiles. The bird in the fifth photo has just caught a mouse. They will immobilise their prey by beating it on the perch, and will automatically do this even when fed dead food such as strips of meat.
Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Ian

The original range of the Laughing Kookaburra comprised only mainland eastern Australia from the tip of Cape York in the north south to Victoria and as far west as eastern South Australia. Since european settlement it has been successfully introduced to southwestern Western Australia, Tasmania, the islands in Bass Strait and Kangaroo Island in South Australia. Unfortunately, in these areas it competes with the native wildlife for food and with species that nest in tree hollows such as Southern Boobooks.

Best wishes,

Ian


Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Phone: +61-7 4751 3115
Preferred Email: ian@birdway.com.au
Website: http://birdway.com.au


Lee’s Addition:

While we were at the National Aviary last summer, we had the privilege of seeing and hearing the Kookaburra in action. Below is the video I took up there. The Kookaburras are in the Alcedinidae – Kingfisher Family of the Coraciiformes Order.

The 5 Kookaburras are the Shovel-billed, Laughing, Blue-winged, Spangled and Rufous-bellied Kookaburra.

Blessed are you who hunger now, For you shall be filled.  Blessed are you who weep now, For you shall laugh. (Luke 6:21 NKJV)

Kookaburra – Chattery Birds With A Merry Heart

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Africaddict

Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Africaddict

A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance: but by sorrow of the heart the spirit is broken. (Proverbs 15:13 KJV)

Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii) by Ian

Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii) by Ian

While updating the Kingfisher pages, I came across these videos about the Kookaburras that are in the same Alcedinidae Family. Thought you might enjoy watching them.

There are five Kookaburras. The Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) is probably the most well known, but there is also a Shovel-billed Kookaburra (Clytoceyx rex), Blue-winged Kookaburra (Dacelo leachii), Spangled Kookaburra (Dacelo tyro), Rufous-bellied Kookaburra (Dacelo gaudichaud).

Kookaburras are best known for their unmistakable call, which sounds uncannily like loud, echoing human laughter — good-natured, but rather hysterical, merriment in the case of the renowned Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae); and maniacal cackling in the case of the slightly smaller Blue-winged Kookaburra (D. leachii). They are generally not closely associated with water, and can be found in habitats ranging from humid forest to arid savanna, but also in suburban and residential areas near running water and where food can be searched for easily.

This video is about the Laughing Kookaburra from the Blank Park Zoo

Kookaburra calls from the Cincinnati Zoo

A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones. (Proverbs 17:22 KJV)

Some information from internet sources

Wordless Birds

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