Sunday Inspiration – Finches IV

American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) on Thistle by Fenton

So God created great sea creatures and every living thing that moves, with which the waters abounded, according to their kind, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” So the evening and the morning were the fifth day. (Genesis 1:21-23 NKJV)

Today, we finish up the Finch Family. I trust you have enjoyed getting to see so many of the finches, “after their kind.” Our Lord, their Creator, gave them some mighty nice colors and markings. There are missing ones, not shown, that are available, but we don’t have permission to use them. So, if you check the internet and books, they can be found.

Eurasian Siskin (Spinus spinus) ©WikiC

Eurasian Siskin (Spinus spinus) ©WikiC

Spinus is a genus of passerine birds in the finch family. It contains the North and South American siskins and goldfinches.

Purple-throated Euphonia (Euphonia chlorotica) by Dario Sanches

Purple-throated Euphonia (Euphonia chlorotica) by Dario Sanches

Most Euphonias are dark metallic blue above and bright yellow below. Many have contrasting pale foreheads and white undertails. Some have light blue patches on the head and/or orangish underparts. They range in overall length from 9 to 11 cm (3.5 to 4.3 in). They eat small fruit and berries particularly mistletoe (Loranthaceae). Some species may also eat some insects.

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“But the angel answered and said to the women, “Do not be afraid, for I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. He is not here; for He is risen, as He said. Come, see the place where the Lord lay.” (Matthew 28:5-6 NKJV)

“Once Upon A Tree” ~ by Faith Baptist Church Choir

“Crown Him Lord of All” ~ Faith Baptist Orchestra

Because of Resurrection Sunday – Easter last week, there was no Sunday Inspiration.

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Sunday Inspiration – Finches I

Sunday Inspiration – Finches II

Sunday Inspiration – Finches III

More Sunday Inspiration

Fringillidae – Finches

Fringillid Finches & Allies – Ian’s Birdway

Finch – Wikipedia

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Sunday Inspiration – Starlings, Mynas and Rhabdornis

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) by Robert Scanlon

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) by Robert Scanlon

I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine. (Psalms 50:11 NKJV)

This weeks Sturnidae Family is rather large with 123 species presently. (Twenty-three are Mynas; three are Rhabdornis; one Coleto and the rest are Starlings.) Here in the U. S., when we think of a Starling it is a very the plain Common (European) Starling. Yet other Starlings are very colorful and beautiful creations from our Lord.

Golden-breasted Starling at NA

Golden-breasted Starling at National Aviary by Lee

The name “Sturnidae” comes from the Latin word for starling, sturnus. Many Asian species, particularly the larger ones, are called mynas, and many African species are known as glossy starlings because of their iridescent plumage. Starlings are native to the Old World, from Europe, Asia and Africa, to northern Australia and the islands of the tropical Pacific. Several European and Asian species have been introduced to these areas as well as North America, Hawaii and New Zealand, where they generally compete for habitats with native birds and are considered to be invasive species. The starling species familiar to most people in Europe and North America is the common starling, and throughout much of Asia and the Pacific, the common myna is indeed common.

Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi Palm Beach Zoo by Lee

Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi Palm Beach Zoo by Lee

Starlings have strong feet, their flight is strong and direct, and they are very gregarious. Their preferred habitat is fairly open country, and they eat insects and fruit. Several species live around human habitation and are effectively omnivores. Many species search for prey such as grubs by “open-bill probing”, that is, forcefully opening the bill after inserting it into a crevice, thus expanding the hole and exposing the prey; this behaviour is referred to by the German verb zirkeln (pronounced [ˈtsɪʁkəln]).

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) Eggs ©WikiC

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) Eggs ©WikiC

Plumage of many species is typically dark with a metallic sheen. Most species nest in holes and lay blue or white eggs.

Metallic Starling (Aplonis metallica) by Ian

Metallic Starling (Aplonis metallica) by Ian

Starlings have diverse and complex vocalizations and have been known to embed sounds from their surroundings into their own calls, including car alarms and human speech patterns. The birds can recognize particular individuals by their calls and are currently the subject of research into the evolution of human language.

Stripe-headed Rhabdornis (Rhabdornis mystacalis) ©©

Stripe-headed Rhabdornis (Rhabdornis mystacalis) ©©

James J. S. Johnson just wrote about the murmuration of the Starlings in Choreographed Choir on the Wing: Birds of a Feather Flock Together. “The starlings are generally a highly social family. Most species associate in flocks of varying sizes throughout the year. A flock of starlings is called a murmuration. These flocks may include other species of starlings and sometimes species from other families. This sociality is particularly evident in their roosting behavior; in the non-breeding season some roosts can number in the thousands of birds.” (Most information from Wikipedia)

Starling Murmuration

Starling Murmuration

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Many of the family members in random order:

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“Once Upon A Tree” ~ Choir – and – “Sing To Jesus” ~ Angel Long & Jessie Padgett

More Sunday Inspirations

Sturnidae – Starlings, Rhabdornis

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Metallic Starling

Starling – Wikipedia

Wages or a Gift