Sunday Inspiration – Finches III

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) by Ian

Also he spoke of trees, from the cedar tree of Lebanon even to the hyssop that springs out of the wall; he spoke also of animals, of birds, of creeping things, and of fish. (1 Kings 4:33 NKJV)

Well, we are still working our way through the large Fringillidae – Finches family. Today, Part III, we will begin with the genus Haemorhous (various shades of red are characteristic plumage colors of this group) which is more familiar to us in the U.S. Those are our Purple, Cassin’s, and House Finches.

Yellow-breasted Greenfinch (Chloris spinoides) ©WikiC

Yellow-breasted Greenfinch (Chloris spinoides) ©WikiC

After them the Greenfinches of the Chloris genus and the lone Desert Finch (Rhodospiza obsoleta), three Golden-winged Grosbeak (Rhynchostus) and an Oriole Finch (Linurgus olivaceus)

Yellow Canary (Crithagra flaviventris) Male ©WikiC

Yellow Canary (Crithagra flaviventris) Male ©WikiC

The next genus – Crithagra has 37 species which include Seedeaters, Citril, Canary, Serin, Siskin, and Grosbeak-Canary. With those, will end Finches III and save the rest of the family for Finches IV. Maybe with the DNA testing going on, some of this family may be split off to other families in the future and won’t be so large.

In case you missed the first two parts, you can click these links. Sunday Inspiration – Finches I and Sunday Inspiration – Finches II

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

*

By them the birds of the heavens have their home; They sing among the branches. He waters the hills from His upper chambers; The earth is satisfied with the fruit of Your works. (Psalms 104:12-13 NKJV)

“Shout To The North and the South” ~ by Faith Baptist Church Choir

*

Sunday Inspiration – Finches I

Sunday Inspiration – Finches II

More Sunday Inspiration

Fringillidae – Finches

Fringillid Finches & Allies – Ian’s Birdway

Finch – Wikipedia

Sharing The Gospel

*

Sunday Inspiration – Dippers, Leafbirds and Flowerpeckers

White-throated Dipper (Cinclus cinclus) by Ian 5

White-throated Dipper (Cinclus cinclus) by Ian

This week we have birds running around in the water, another family of birds that are mostly green and a group that loves nectar. Which ones are they?

Let’s start with the Cinclidae – Dippers family. There are only five members in the Cinclus genus. They get their name from their bobbing or dipping movements. They are unique among passerines for their ability to dive and swim underwater. What an ability the Lord gave this family of dippers. Watch!

***

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) by W Kwong

Orange-bellied Leafbird (Chloropsis hardwickii) by W Kwong

Our next group belong to the Chloropseidae – Leafbirds Family and they have 11 species with many subspecies. They are small birds found in India, Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia. They are one of only three bird families that are entirely endemic to the Indomalayan ecozone.

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) by Peter Ericsson

Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker (Dicaeum cruentatum) by Peter Ericsson

The flowers appear on the earth; The time of singing has come (Song of Solomon 2:12a NKJV)

This last family,  Dicaeidae – Flowerpeckers, has 48 species. The family is distributed through tropical southern Asia and Australasia from India east to the Philippines and south to Australia. The family is catholic in its habitat preferences, occupying a wide range of environments from sea level to montane habitats. Some species, such as the Mistletoebird of Australia, are recorded as being highly nomadic over parts of their range.

Nectar forms part of the diet, although they also take berries, spiders and insects. Mistletoes of 21 species in 12 genera have been found to be part of the diet of flowerpeckers, and it is thought that all species have adaptations (Creative design) to eat these berries and dispose of them quickly. (Wikipedia with modification)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“Faith Medley” ~ Faith Baptist Choir

*

Sunday Inspirations

Cinclidae – Dippers

Chloropseidae – Leafbirds

Dicaeidae – Flowerpeckers

Assurance: The Certainty of Salvation

*

Merry Christmas 2015

Merry Christmas

That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked upon, and our hands have handled, of the Word of life; (For the life was manifested, and we have seen it, and bear witness, and shew unto you that eternal life, which was with the Father, and was manifested unto us;) That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you, that ye also may have fellowship with us: and truly our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ. And these things write we unto you, that your joy may be full. (1 John 1:1-4 KJV)

I would like to share with you our Christmas Cantata presented on December 13, 2015 at Faith Baptist Church in Winter Haven, Florida. They all did fantastic and thought you would enjoy it also.

It was entitled, “Lord of Glory” Christmas Cantata

May the Lord bless you as you share Christmas with family and friends. Dan and I would both like to wish you a great Christmas day full of blessings from the Lord.

*

 

Sunday Inspiration – Starlings, Mynas and Rhabdornis

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) by Robert Scanlon

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) by Robert Scanlon

I know all the birds of the mountains, And the wild beasts of the field are Mine. (Psalms 50:11 NKJV)

This weeks Sturnidae Family is rather large with 123 species presently. (Twenty-three are Mynas; three are Rhabdornis; one Coleto and the rest are Starlings.) Here in the U. S., when we think of a Starling it is a very the plain Common (European) Starling. Yet other Starlings are very colorful and beautiful creations from our Lord.

Golden-breasted Starling at NA

Golden-breasted Starling at National Aviary by Lee

The name “Sturnidae” comes from the Latin word for starling, sturnus. Many Asian species, particularly the larger ones, are called mynas, and many African species are known as glossy starlings because of their iridescent plumage. Starlings are native to the Old World, from Europe, Asia and Africa, to northern Australia and the islands of the tropical Pacific. Several European and Asian species have been introduced to these areas as well as North America, Hawaii and New Zealand, where they generally compete for habitats with native birds and are considered to be invasive species. The starling species familiar to most people in Europe and North America is the common starling, and throughout much of Asia and the Pacific, the common myna is indeed common.

Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi Palm Beach Zoo by Lee

Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi Palm Beach Zoo by Lee

Starlings have strong feet, their flight is strong and direct, and they are very gregarious. Their preferred habitat is fairly open country, and they eat insects and fruit. Several species live around human habitation and are effectively omnivores. Many species search for prey such as grubs by “open-bill probing”, that is, forcefully opening the bill after inserting it into a crevice, thus expanding the hole and exposing the prey; this behaviour is referred to by the German verb zirkeln (pronounced [ˈtsɪʁkəln]).

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) Eggs ©WikiC

Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) Eggs ©WikiC

Plumage of many species is typically dark with a metallic sheen. Most species nest in holes and lay blue or white eggs.

Metallic Starling (Aplonis metallica) by Ian

Metallic Starling (Aplonis metallica) by Ian

Starlings have diverse and complex vocalizations and have been known to embed sounds from their surroundings into their own calls, including car alarms and human speech patterns. The birds can recognize particular individuals by their calls and are currently the subject of research into the evolution of human language.

Stripe-headed Rhabdornis (Rhabdornis mystacalis) ©©

Stripe-headed Rhabdornis (Rhabdornis mystacalis) ©©

James J. S. Johnson just wrote about the murmuration of the Starlings in Choreographed Choir on the Wing: Birds of a Feather Flock Together. “The starlings are generally a highly social family. Most species associate in flocks of varying sizes throughout the year. A flock of starlings is called a murmuration. These flocks may include other species of starlings and sometimes species from other families. This sociality is particularly evident in their roosting behavior; in the non-breeding season some roosts can number in the thousands of birds.” (Most information from Wikipedia)

Starling Murmuration

Starling Murmuration

*

Many of the family members in random order:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

*

“Once Upon A Tree” ~ Choir – and – “Sing To Jesus” ~ Angel Long & Jessie Padgett

More Sunday Inspirations

Sturnidae – Starlings, Rhabdornis

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Metallic Starling

Starling – Wikipedia

Wages or a Gift

 

Sunday Inspiration – Sylviid Babblers

Eurasian Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla) ©WikiC

Eurasian Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla) ©WikiC

Here is our next avian group taxonomically, the Sylviidae – Sylvid Babblers Family. The Lord created these birds with a song to sing and some that are very colorful. Actually there are very few Babblers in the family. There are Blackcaps, various Warblers, Whitethroats, Fulvettas, Parrotbills plus a Myzornis and a Catbird.

Fire-tailed Myzornis (Myzornis pyrrhoura) ©WikiC

Fire-tailed Myzornis (Myzornis pyrrhoura) ©WikiC

Sylviidae is a family of passerine birds that was part of an assemblage known as the Old World warblers. The family was formerly a wastebin taxon with over 400 species of bird in over 70 genera. The family was poorly defined with many characteristics shared with other families. Advances in classification, particularly helped with molecular data, have led to the splitting out of several new families from within this group. Today the smaller family Sylviidae includes the typical warblers in the genus Sylvia, the parrotbills of Asia (formerly a separate family Paradoxornithidae), a number of babblers formerly placed within the family Timaliidae (which is itself currently being split) and the wrentit, an unusual North American bird that has been a longstanding taxonomic mystery.

Hume's Whitethroat (Sylvia althaea) ©WikiC

Hume’s Whitethroat (Sylvia althaea) ©WikiC

There is now evidence that these Sylvia “warblers” are more closely related to babblers [Timaliidae], and thus these birds are better referred to as Sylvia babblers, or just sylvids.

Vinous-throated Parrotbill (Sinosuthora webbiana) ©WikiC

Vinous-throated Parrotbill (Sinosuthora webbiana) ©WikiC

Sylviids are small to medium-sized birds. The bill is generally thin and pointed with bristles at the base. Sylviids have a slender shape and an inconspicuous and mostly plain plumage. The wings have ten primaries, which are rounded and short in non-migratory species. (Wikipedia)

For thus says the LORD, Who created the heavens, Who is God, Who formed the earth and made it, Who has established it, Who did not create it in vain, Who formed it to be inhabited: “I am the LORD, and there is no other. (Isaiah 45:18 NKJV)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Now if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is, and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will He not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? (Matthew 6:30 NKJV)

“I Stand Amazed” ~ Faith Baptist Choir

*

More Sunday Inspirations 

Sylviidae – Sylviid Babblers

Sylviidae – Wikipedia

Parrotbill – Wikipedia

Babbler For Who?

*

Sunday Inspiration – Laughingthrush Leiothrichidae Family

Sumatran Laughingthrush (Garrulax bicolor) by Dan at Wing of Asia ZM

Sumatran Laughingthrush (Garrulax bicolor) by Dan at Wing of Asia ZM

A merry heart does good, like medicine, But a broken spirit dries the bones. (Proverbs 17:22 NKJV)

Every since we saw Laughingthrushes for the first time at Zoo Miami’s Wing of Asia aviary, I fell in love with these birds. The photo above is the one I like to call “Joe Cool.” Their “sunglasses” makes them look rather “Cool” don’t you think? They are fun to watch and most of them like to hop around instead of walking.

Joe Cool

(Black and White) Sumatran Laughingthrush (Garrulax bicolor) by Lee “Joe Cool”

The Laughingthrush Family, called Leiothrichidae, has 133 species and is our next passerine family. Actually there was a Sunday Inspiration about them previously. Sunday Inspiration – Laughingthrush

The Laughingthrushes are the genus Garrulax of the large Old World babbler family of passerine birds. They occur in tropical Asia, with the greatest number of species occurring in the Himalaya and southern China.
These are rangy, medium-sized, floppy-tailed landbirds with soft fluffy plumage. These birds have strong legs and are quite terrestrial. This group is not strongly migratory, and most species have short rounded wings, and a weak flight.

Streaked Laughingthrush (Garrulax lineatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Streaked Laughingthrush (Garrulax lineatus) by Nikhil Devasar

A few, like the Streaked Laughingthrush occur in fairly open habitats, but most are jungle species, difficult to observe in the dense vegetation they prefer.

Like other babblers, these are noisy birds, and the characteristic laughing calls are often the best indication that these birds are present. As with other babbler species, they frequently occur in groups of up to a dozen, and the rainforest species like the Ashy-headed Laughingthrush often occur in the mixed feeding flocks typical of tropical Asian jungle. (Wikipedia)

Red-tailed Laughingthrush at Wings of Asia by Lee

Red-tailed Laughingthrush (Trochalopteron milnei) by Lee

Then our mouth was filled with laughter, And our tongue with singing. Then they said among the nations, “The LORD has done great things for them.” The LORD has done great things for us, And we are glad. Bring back our captivity, O LORD, As the streams in the South. Those who sow in tears Shall reap in joy. He who continually goes forth weeping, Bearing seed for sowing, Shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, Bringing his sheaves with him. (Psalms 126:2-6 NKJV)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“Ten Thousand Joys” ~ Choir – Lisa Brock – Jessie Padgett (Faith Baptist)

*

More Sunday Inspirations

Laughingthrush – Leiothrichidae Family

Who Paints The Leaves?

*