Bird Behavior During the Total Eclipse – BirdCast Re-post

Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) by Neal Addy Gallery

Yea, the sparrow hath found an house, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, even thine altars, O LORD of hosts, my King, and my God. (Psalms 84:3 KJV)

What an interesting article about the recent Total Eclipse of the Sun. This was posted by Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology and you will enjoy reading it. Dan and I went out to watch the eclipse here in middle Florida. We had about 80% coverage and noticed the swallows here out flying around. Now, this article helps explain what we saw. Enjoy reading this:

What Do Birds Do During a Total Eclipse? Observations from eBird and Radar on August 21, 2017

“26 August, 2017

By Benjamin Van Doren, Andrew Farnsworth, and Ian Davies

Approximately every 18 months a total solar eclipse is visible somewhere on the surface of the Earth. During previous total solar eclipses, numerous observers have reported interesting animal behavior—especially describing birds. With the advent of citizen science and projects like eBird, we now have the opportunity to examine bird behaviors as reported by a large number of observers almost immediately and at a much grander scale. The amazing accounts below of birding during Monday’s total solar eclipse are all from eBird checklists submitted by birders like you—please submit your eclipse sightings if you haven’t already!

We looked at 7,800 checklists submitted to eBird.org on August 21, 2017 and focused on 1,350 checklists submitted from the time of maximum eclipse. Below, we highlight interesting observations from the path of totality (black circular icons with white borders, representing a total eclipse) and outside of it (partial eclipse icons of varying magnitude).”

One quote that made our Swallow behavior make sense:

From Joshua Stone and Nicole Trimmer in Johnson County, Illinois:

Just before totality, the chimney swifts started flying low and acting like it was dusk. They continued during totality, flying low overhead and chittering.

TO READ THE ARTICLE CLICK HERE

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Birds of the Bible – Swallows

Birds Of The Bible – Swallow-tailed Kites

Swallows Evolving Shorter Wings?

Swallow hit and it's mate

Like a flitting sparrow, like a flying swallow, So a curse without cause shall not alight. (Proverbs 26:2 NKJV)

Wanted to share an article I came across about Swallows.

A recent article from the UK’s Daily Mail declared, “Swallows are evolving shorter wings because they keep getting hit by traffic.” Now, the article explains the results of a recent study from the journal Current Biology. The study examined cliff swallows, both living and dead, that build their mud nests on highway overpasses, to see if there were certain traits in swallows that favored their survival. The researchers argued that natural selection should “favor individuals that either learn to avoid cars or that have other traits making them less likely to collide with vehicles.” The study found that the swallows that survived had shorter wingspans, while the ones that died had longer wings…..”

To see the rest of Ken Ham’s Article. Birds Produce Wings – Evolution?

Also in my Answers magazine, they mentioned

“three enthusiastic brothers, ages 10, 11, and 13, are combining their interest in writing, creationism, and web design to launch the Virtual Creation Zoo. Their goal is to declare the glory of our Creator, and these three boys are doing it! “

Visit their website, Virtual Creation Zoo.

(Answers,Vol.8 No.1 July-Sept 2013)

(Original Article in Daily Mail)

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Bible Birds – Swallow Introduction

Red-rumped Swallow (Cecropis daurica) by Nikhil Devasar

Red-rumped Swallow (Cecropis daurica) by Nikhil Devasar

Even the stork in the heavens Knows her appointed times; And the turtledove, the swift, and the swallow Observe the time of their coming. But My people do not know the judgment of the LORD. (Jeremiah 8:7 NKJV)

(Relocated)

 

Our Built-In Homing Device – (excerpt from Hanging Out With God)

American Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) by Daves BirdingPix

“Did you hear the bells this past Monday? The bells at San Juan Capistrano? Thousands of people did hear them, because they gathered, as they do every year, to rejoice in and celebrate the return of the beloved Swallows. These famous swallows begin their flight every year at dawn on February 18th, from the Argentinian city of Goya, and arrive at the San Juan Capistrano mission, without fail, on the morning of March 19th.

According to Argentinian magazine correspondent Enrique Bermudez, who has made a thorough study of the swallows, they fly a total of 7,500 miles one way on this astounding trip, which they have been making every year for at least 200 years…..”

See the whole article at Our Built-In Homing Device

Very Good Article – worth reading,

Lee