Lee’s Five Word Friday – 3/10/17

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Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by SanDiegoZoo

THOU DIDST HIDE THY FACE

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“LORD, by thy favour thou hast made my mountain to stand strong: thou didst hide thy face, and I was troubled.” (Psalms 30:7 KJV)

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by SanDiegoZoo

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More Daily Devotionals

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Birds Vol 1 #1 – The Cock-Of-The-Rock

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited

Vol 1. January, 1897 No. 1

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Cock-of-th-Rock

Cock-of-th-Rock


THE COCK-OF-THE-ROCK.

imgtHE Cock-of-the-Rock lives in Guiana. Its nest is found among the rocks. T. K. Salmon says: “I once went to see the breeding place of the Cock-of-the-Rock; and a darker or wilder place I have never been in. Following up a mountain stream the gorge became gradually more enclosed and more rocky, till I arrived at the mouth of a cave with high rock on each side, and overshadowed by high trees, into which the sun never penetrated. All was wet and dark, and the only sound heard was the rushing of the water over the rocks. We had hardly become accustomed to the gloom when a nest was found, a dark bird stealing away from what seemed to be a lump of mud upon the face of the rock. This was a nest of the Cock-of-the-Rock, containing two eggs; it was built upon a projecting piece, the body being made of mud or clay, then a few sticks, and on the top lined with green moss. It was about five feet from the water. I did not see the male bird, and, indeed, I have rarely ever seen the male and female birds together, though I have seen both sexes in separate flocks.”

The eggs are described as pale buff with various sized spots of shades from red-brown to pale lilac.

It is a solitary and wary bird, feeding before sunrise and after sunset and hiding through the day in sombre ravines.

Robert Schomburgh describes its dance as follows:

“While traversing the mountains of Western Guiana we fell in with a pack of these splendid birds, which gave me the opportunity of being an eye witness of their dancing, an accomplishment which I had hitherto regarded as a fable. We cautiously approached their ballet ground and place of meeting, which lay some little distance from the road. The stage, if we may so call it, measured from four to five feet in diameter; every blade of grass had been removed and the ground was as smooth as if leveled by human hands. On this space we saw one of the birds dance and jump about, while the others evidently played the part of admiring spectators. At one moment it expanded its wings, threw its head in the air, or spread out its tail like a peacock scratching the ground with its foot; all this took place with a sort of hopping gait, until tired, when on emitting a peculiar note, its place was immediately filled by another performer. In this manner the different birds went through their terpsichorean exercises, each retiring to its place among the spectators, who had settled on the low bushes near the theatre of operations. We counted ten males and two females in the flock. The noise of a breaking stick unfortunately raised an alarm, when the whole company of dancers immediately flew off.”

The Cock-Of-The-Rock video by IBirdCollection


Guianan Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola rupicola) ©©lolodoc

Guianan Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola rupicola) ©©lolodoc

Lee’s Addition:

I removed one paragraph that talked about natives killing some of them. The Cock-of the-Rock is an interesting bird. Just their appearance tickles me. They don’t seem to have a beak. There are two Cock-of-the-rocks; the Guianan and the Andean which is the National Bird of Peru.

“The Cock-of-the-rock, which compose the genus Rupicola, are South American cotingid birds. They are found in tropical and subtropical rainforests close to rocky areas, where they build their nests. Like some other cotingids, they have a complex court behaviour, performing impressive lek displays.

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by ©Wiki Closeup

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by ©Wiki Closeup

The males are magnificent birds, not only because of their bright orange or red colors, but also because of their very prominent fan-shaped crests. The far duller females are overall brownish. They are wary animals and primarily feed on fruits and berries.” (Wikipedia)

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) female by SanDiegoZoo

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) female by SanDiegoZoo

The Cotingidae – Cotingas Family is where you will find the Cock-of-the-Rocks. “The cotingas are a large family of passerine bird species found in Central America and tropical South America. Cotingas are birds of forests or forest edges, which mostly eat fruit or insects and fruit. Comparatively little is known about this diverse group, although all have broad bills with hooked tips, rounded wings, and strong legs. They may be the most diverse passerine family in body size, ranging from the 8-cm Kinglet Calyptura to the 50-cm male Amazonian Umbrellabird, although the smaller bird may not be a true cotinga.

The males of many species, such as the cock-of-the-rocks, are brightly coloured, or decorated with plumes or wattles, like the umbrellabirds, with their umbrella-like crest and long throat wattles. Some, like the bellbirds and the Screaming Piha, have distinctive and far-carrying calls. The females of most species are duller than the males.

Most species are polygynous, and only the females care for the eggs and young. Both brilliant male colors and loud vocalizations are the result of sexual selection. Many have striking courtship displays, often grouped together in leks. In such canopy-dwelling genera as Carpodectes, Cotinga, and Xipholena, males gather high in a single tree or in adjacent trees, but male cocks-of-the-rock, as befits their more terrestrial lives, give their elaborate displays in leks on the ground.

On the other hand, the Purple-throated Fruitcrow lives in mixed groups in which one female lays an egg and the others help provide insects to the chick.

Nests differ greatly. Many species lay a single egg in a nest so flimsy that the egg can be seen from underneath. This may make the nests hard for predators to find. Fruiteaters build more solid cup nests, and the cocks-of-the-rock attach their mud nests to cliffs.”

Birds Illustrated by Color Photograhy Vol 1 January 1897 No 1 - Cover

Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited  – Introduction

The above article is the sixth article in the monthly serial that was started in January 1897 “designed to promote Knowledge of Bird-Live.” These include Color Photography, as they call them, today they are drawings. There are at least three Volumes that have been digitized by Project Gutenberg.

To see the whole series of – Birds Illustrated by Color Photography – Revisited 

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(Information from Wikipedia and other internet sources)

Next Article – The Red Bird Of Paradise

Previous Article – The Australian Grass Parrakeet

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ABC’s Of The Gospel

Links:

Cotingidae – Cotingas Family

Cock-of-the-rock – Wikipedia

Cotinga – Wikipedia

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Andean Cock-of-the-rock – The Changer…

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by SanDiegoZoo

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by SanDiegoZoo

The Andean Cock-of-the-rock – The Changer… ~ by a j mithra

The Andean Cock-of-the-rock is a medium sized bird, living in the Andes, from Venezuela South to Bolivia. It’s one of the most spectacular birds, with strikingly bright colours. Spotting this beautiful bird is not very common, though, as they’re extremely shy and don’t usually fly near humans.

Males displaying by ibirdcollection

Mature males spend much of their time in leks, which are communal courtship sites, where many males gather and practice their “mating dance”. This ritual consists of challenging a rival male for displaying their force, by flapping wings, jumping, running around, nodding and giving off a variety of squawking and grunting calls. When females visit the lek, these “mating dances” become even more intense, more loud and often turn into a display of bright colours and loud, strange sounds. After this, the female chooses the most impressive male to mate with. It is also notable, that due to defecation of seeds by the males, leks are often rich in vegetation.

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) female by SanDiegoZoo

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) female by SanDiegoZoo

While the females incubate the Andean Cock-of-the-rock males have gone back to the lek, in search of another female partner. Most of the males’ life revolves around activities in the lek, challenging rivals, practicing their “mating dances” and attracting females, while most of the females’ life concentrates upon nesting and incubating the eggs.

God expects the Church, His the bride, to just concentrate on expanding His kingdom..

His reason for choosing us is not to just warm the church benches, but, to go in search of His lost sheep…

But go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. (Matthew 10:6)

The Cock-of-the Rock is one of the world’s most spectacular birds. It’s fantastic plumage and colorful courtship display equal those of any bird of paradise. It is the national bird of Peru for it’s beautiful plumage, resembling a bird from the paradise. Being one of the most beautiful birds, the Andean Cock-of-the-rock is one of the nature’s wonders.

The Andean Cock-of-the-Rock is distributed in the Andes from Venezuela south to Bolivia, while the Guianan Cock-of-the Rock is found in the more ancient, and highly eroded mountains that lie east of the Andes and north of the Amazon River….

When Moses came down from Mount Sinai after forty days, His face shone radiantly…

These beautiful birds are found in highly eroded mountains…  Is that the reason they look so beautiful?

When we dwell on THE ROCK, we sure would turn beautiful like Him… Remember that He had created us in His image…

Arise, shine; for thy light is come, and the glory of the LORD is risen upon thee. (Isaiah 60:1)

When the Cock-of-the-Rock eats fruit, it swallows many of the seeds whole and most of these are not damaged when they pass through its digestive system. Thus, many seeds remain capable of germinating when the Cock-of-the-Rock defecates or regurgitates them at considerable distances from the parent trees. In this way, the Cock-of-the-Rock plays an important role in dispersing seeds of many different species of forest trees. When the Cock-of-the-Rock eats fruit, it swallows many of the seeds whole and most of these are not damaged when they pass through its digestive system.

Since the adult male Cock-of-the-Rock concentrates his time and activities around the lek, and the adult female concentrates her time and activities around cliff nest sites where several females may build nests in close proximity to each other, seeds are deposited more frequently at leks and at nest sites. Once, seeds of 21 species of plants under the perches of males. All were believed to have been defecated or regurgitated by the males.

Likewise, collected droppings under a nest of the Guianan Cock-of-the-Rock in French Guiana, was found to have the seeds of 52 plant species. In an earlier study, collected droppings under 7 nests of the Andean Cock-of-the-Rock at a site west of Cali, Colombia, had the seeds of at least 35 plant species.

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by Wiki

Andean Cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus) by Wiki

When high densities of seeds are deposited in this way at Cock-of-the-Rock leks or nest sites,and when  environmental conditions are favorable for their germination and growth, the abundance and diversity of plant species growing from these seeds can be greatly increased at leks and nests, making the plant communities at these sites different from that of the surrounding forest.

The lek was located on the ridge of a steep granite hill, and its vegetation differed markedly from that of the surrounding forest and nearby ridge tops. While most of the flora at these other sites was fairly homogeneous, the vegetation at the Cock-of-the-Rock lek was a mosaic of plant species typical of many different communities. After analyzing the lek vegetation more thoroughly, researchers concluded that the greater part of it resulted from long-term seed dispersal by Cock-of-the-Rock males.

If the feeding habit of these birds can change the whole environment, our feeding habit on the word of God should have changed everyone around us…

If these birds can change a steep granite hill in to a mosaic of plant species typical of many different communities, so can we with a little help from God change, all stony hearts in to a garden of the Lilly of the valley and the Rose of Sharon…

It all depends on how many seeds we sow and how long we sow without looking at how many had sprouted…

Our job is to just sow and water…

So then neither is he that planteth any thing, neither he that watereth; but God that giveth the increase. (1 Corinthians 3:7)

Have a blessed day!

Your’s in YESHUA,
a j mithra

Please visit us at: Crosstree


Lee’s Addition:

Andean Cock-of-the-Rock has a close cousin in the Guianan Cock-of-the-rock. They are both in the Cotingidae – Cotinga Family which is part of the Passeriformes Order. The Cotingidae not only has those 2 birds, but 62 others including the Cotingas, Plantcutters, Berryeaters and Fruiteaters, Bellbirds, Pihas, Fruitcrows, a Capuchinbird and 3 Umbrellabirds.