Sunday Inspiration – New World Warblers II

Golden-cheeked Warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia) ©USFWS

Golden-cheeked Warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia) ©USFWS

“But He knows the way that I take; When He has tested me, I shall come forth as gold.” (Job 23:10 NKJV)

Now for the last half of the New World Warbler Family. See the first half at Sunday Inspiration – New World Warblers I. The Parulidae family has 119 members presently. The Setophage genus is numerous with 37 species which are seen by many of here in the United States. Many of these had their genus changed from Dendroica to Setophage and some may still refer to them with the older genus name. Sibleyguides has a nice chart showing how they rearranged the taxonomy.

Flavescent Warbler (Myiothlypis flaveolus) by Dario Sanches

Flavescent Warbler (Myiothlypis flaveolus) by Dario Sanches

The next genus is the Myiothlopis group. The 14 here are best represented in Central and South America. This is one of only two warbler genera that are well represented in the latter continent. All of these species were formerly placed in the genus Basileuterus.

Collared Whitestart (Myioborus torquatus) by Reinier Munguia

Collared Whitestart (Myioborus torquatus) by Reinier Munguia

The Basileuterus genus still has nine species. Again, they are mainly in the Central and South America areas. These are mainly robust warblers with a stout bill. The majority of species have olive or grey upperparts and yellow underparts. The head is often strikingly marked with a long broad supercilium, a coloured crown or crown stripes, and often other striking head markings.

Many species are not well-studied, but those for which the breeding habits are known all build a domed nest on a bank or on the ground, so this is presumably typical of the genus as a whole.

Golden-crowned Warbler (Basileuterus culicivorus) ©WikiC

Golden-crowned Warbler (Basileuterus culicivorus) ©WikiC

The Cardellina and the Myioborus (Whitestarts) round out the rest of the family. They have 5 and 12 species respectively. The 12 whitestarts are New World warblers in the genus Myioborus. The English name refers to the white outer tail feathers which are a prominent feature of the members of this genus (“start” is an archaic word for “tail”). They are from mainly northern South America and are spreading north to Central America and the USA. The five Cardellina are from South America. (Info from Wikipedia)

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A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold In settings of silver. (Proverbs 25:11 NKJV)

“Heavenly Sunlight” ~ by Artisans in Brass ©Used With Permission

Artisans in Brass (Website) – Artisans in Brass (Facebook)

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Sunday Inspiration

Sunday Inspiration – New World Warblers I

Parulidae – New World Warblers

New World Warbler – Wikipedia

New World (Wood) Warblers – Ian’s Birdway

New World Warblers (Parulidae) – IBC

Sunday Inspiration – New World Warblers I

Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) ©WikiC

Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) ©WikiC

Sing unto the LORD, all the earth; shew forth from day to day his salvation. Declare his glory among the heathen; his marvellous works among all nations. For great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised: he also is to be feared above all gods. (1 Chronicles 16:23-25 KJV)

This week we will start checking out the New World Warbler family, the Parulidae. At present there are 119 species listed and we will divide them up into two weeks.

The New World warblers or wood-warblers are a group of small, often colorful, passerine birds which make up the family Parulidae and are restricted to the New World. They are closely related to neither the Old World warblers nor the Australian warblers. Most are arboreal, but some, like the Ovenbird and the two waterthrushes, are more terrestrial. Most members of this family are insectivores.

Tennessee Warbler (Leiothlypis peregrina) by Raymond Barlow

Tennessee Warbler (Leiothlypis peregrina) by Raymond Barlow

All the warblers are fairly small. The smallest species is the Lucy’s Warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), at about 6.5 grams and 10.6 cm (4.2 in). The largest species depends upon the true taxonomy of the family. Traditionally, it was listed as Yellow-breasted Chat, at 18.2 cm (7.2 in). Since this may not be parulid, the Parkesia waterthrushes, the Ovenbird, the Russet-crowned Warbler and Semper’s Warbler, all of which can exceed 15 cm (6 in) and 21 grams, could be considered the largest.

We will view the Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) down through the Setophaga genus. That is about 60 species and then cover the last of the family next week.

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Sing unto him, sing psalms unto him, talk ye of all his wondrous works. (1 Chronicles 16:9 KJV)

“How Can I Keep From Singing?” ~ Pastor Jerry Smith, Reagan, Caleb and Jessie

(I know this song has been used before, but these birds are so beautiful and love to sing, and it makes my heart want to sing with Praise to Our Creator Savior)

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Sunday Inspiration

Parulidae – New World Warblers

New World Warbler – Wikipedia

New World (Wood) Warblers – Ian’s Birdway

New World Warblers (Parulidae) – IBC

Who Paints The Leaves?

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Yellow-rumped Warbler Split

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata)

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata)

Out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to Adam to see what he would call them. And whatever Adam called each living creature, that was its name. (Genesis 2:19 NKJV)

When I wrote the article about our trip to S. Lake Howard Nature Park this week, I was not exactly sure which of the Old Yellow-rumped Warblers I had seen. Since the 2.4 Version of the I.O.C. (International Ornithologist Congress) list, they split the “Butterbutt” into four species. Hadn’t looked into it too much, but now is the time to try to figure out which one is which.

The four birds are the:
Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata) – Eastern U.S. Mostly
Audubon’s Warbler (Dendroica auduboni) – Western U.S. Mostly
Black-fronted Warbler (Dendroica nigrifrons)
Goldman’s Warbler (Dendroica goldmani)

After doing quite a bit of research, I was wrong about the Audubon Warbler. Not only do I not live in the west, but after studying lots of photos, it is the Myrtle Warbler not the Audubon’s Warbler, as I first thought, that we saw.

Here are some of the traits of the Myrtle Warbler (from USGS about the Myrtle and Audubon’s Warblers):

Bright yellow rump (nicknamed “butterbutts”)

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata) Bright yellow rump

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata) Bright yellow rump

White spots in tail

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata) White spots in tail

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata) White spots in tail

White supercilium and broken eye ring

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata) White supercilium and broken eye

Myrtle Warbler (Dendroica coronata) White supercilium and broken eye

Here are some links to read to help with the split:
Myrtle Warbler by Wikipedia
Audubon’s Warbler by Wikipedia
Welcome back Myrtle Warbler? from the Drinking Bird
Goodbye Yellow-rumped Warbler, welcome back Myrtle Warbler and Audubon’s Warbler . . . by flickr discussion

At any rate, while I was sitting there, the little warbler preened and did not spook as I kept taking its photo.

These warblers belong to the Parulidae Family of the Passeriformes Order.

This is not an extensive listing of the birds, as the above articles covered much of it. These photos were taken by me (Lee).

The Slide show is of the Myrtle Warbler in the time sequence they were taken.

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Ian’s Bird of the Week – Wilson’s Warbler

Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) by Ian

Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) by Ian

Ian’s Bird of the Week – Wilson’s Warbler ~ by Ian Montgomery

Newsletter – 09-21-10

Here is the attractive Wlson’s Warbler one of the New World Wood-Warblers (family Parulidae) that is quite common in Canada and the western United States. We encountered this one at Point Reyes, an pleasant coastal area and good birding spot just north of San Francisco. With a length of only 12cm/4.75in, the specific name pusilla (small) given to it by Alexander Wilson in 1811 is appropriate.

The Wood-Warblers, so named to distinguish them from the unrelated Old World Warblers, are justifiably popular with American birders, particular during the spring and fall migrations. They come in a wide variety of shapes and colours, with over 50 species (out of a family total of near 120) occurring in North America. Most species spend the winter in Central and South America, a few in the warmer southern states such as California and Florida and during the migration, many birders are on the lookout for Warblers occurring outside their breeding range.

Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) by Ian

Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) by Ian

Alexander Wilson moved from Scotland to Pennsylvania in 1794 at the age of 28, became interested in ornithology in 1801 and decided in 1802 to publish a book illustrating all the North America birds. This appeared as the nine volume American Ornithology between 1808 and 1814, though Wilson died in 1813 and the ninth volume was completed by his friend George Ord. He met John James Audubon in 1810 and probably inspired him to publish his own book of illustrations, even though Audubon’s reaction to Wilson is described as ‘decidedly ambiguous’. (He declined to subscribe to American Ornithology, felt his own illustrations were much better and, in 1820, decided to publish the ‘greatest bird book ever’.) Seven species of birds are name after Wilson, including two on the Australian list, Wilson’s Phalarope and Wilson’s Storm-Petrel.

I have had a report of a list member having trouble accessing the Birdway website. If you have encountered any such difficulties recently, I’d like to hear from you. Recent additions to the website include:

Black Turnstone
Cassin’s Auklet
Rhinoceros Auklet
Sora
Virginia Rail

Best wishes,
Ian

Ian Montgomery, Birdway Pty Ltd,
454 Forestry Road, Bluewater, Qld 4818
Phone: +61-7 4751 3115
Preferred Email: ian@birdway.com.au
Website: http://birdway.com.au


Lee’s Addition:

Another winner for Ian. What a pretty little warbler. I like that black cap it is wearing. As he said, they are in the Parulidae Family. You can see his photos of the Parulidaes and then check out the whole family here at the Parulidae Family. There are 120 members in the family at this time.

By them the birds of the heavens have their home; They sing among the branches. (Psalms 104:12 NKJV)

The Cerulean Warbler – The V I P …

The Cerulean Warbler – The V I P … – by a j mithra

Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) ©Wikipedia

Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) ©Wikipedia

Named for the male’s unique blue color, the cerulean warbler is a small, migratory bird that weighs about 0.3 oz. During migration, cerulean warblers pass through the southern United States, flying across the Gulf of Mexico to the highlands of Central America and on to South America….

They winter in broad-leaved evergreen forests within a narrow band of middle elevations (1,600 to 6,000 ft.) in the Andes Mountains of northern South America from Columbia to Peru and Venezuela….

Recent findings show that the birds begin their spring migration to the breeding grounds by flying approximately 1,000 miles over the Caribbean Sea to reach Nicaragua and Belize.

Are you feeling small and insecure?

Just remember, these birds are so small, yet GOD has given them the energy to cross not only over the Caribbean sea but also such long distance…

GOD loves to use small things to do great works…

Like David to bring down goliath, a girl to bring healing to an army commander and a small boy to feed the multitudes…

The little one shall become a thousand, and the small one a strong nation; I, Jehovah, will hasten it in its time. (Isaiah 60:22)

Cerulean warblers nest and raise their young in large tracts of deciduous hardwood forest that have tall, large-diameter trees and diverse vertical structure in the forest canopy from early spring to late summer. .

Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) female by Steve Slayton

Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea) female by Steve Slayton

They prefer uplands, wet bottomlands, moist slopes, and mountains from less than

100 feet to more than 3,500 feet in elevation.

The Cerulean Warbler is a flagship species for conservation due to its attractiveness, high conservation concern and life history. The Cerulean Warbler often inhabits areas that are of global importance for conservation, yet are highly threatened. Therefore, conserving the Cerulean Warbler is not only about a shared migratory species, but also the lives of local peoples who will determine its future.

GOD has trust in us and that’s why HE has chosen us to be the flagship species for the conservation and extension of HIS kingdom…

HE is faithful to finish the good work that HE had started in us, but, are we faithful?

A faithful man shall abound with blessings; …… (Proverbs 28:20)

The female has her own fascinating behavior: with wings tucked, the bird purposefully tumbles off the side of her lofty nest. Although not quite in a freefall, just before she hits the ground—like a bungee jumper on a cord—she stops short. Instead of shooting back skyward, however, her open wings whisk her along the forest floor in search of insects, including bees, caterpillars and wasps.

The copyright holder of the chorus of cheerful trills coming from high in the forest canopy is that of the male, as he only sings. The males are also persistent singers who sing at intervals of one and a half minute to two minutes for nearly and hour each morning. Most of the singing is done in the morning and some good songs can be heard in the afternoon also..

The 0.3 oz Cerulean Warbler sings for one hour each morning. If the same bird is of the size of a human, it would be singing all day long…

I think GOD also expects us to sing all day long and that is the reason HE created us..

Anyway, we have to keep singing day and night non-stop in heaven….

If we don’t sing here on earth, is it possible for us to sing for HIM in heaven?

the people which I formed for myself, that they might set forth my praise. (Isaiah 43:21)

Your’s in YESHUA,
a j mithra

Please visit us at: Crosstree


Lee’s Addition:

The Cerulean Warbler is one of the 119 members of the  New World Warblers – Parulidae Family in the Passeriformes Order.

Nice Video of a Cerulean Warbler by Steve Dillinger

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