Sunday Inspiration – Anas Genus

Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) With young ©CountryTraveler

“If a bird’s nest chance to be before thee in the way in any tree, or on the ground, whether they be young ones, or eggs, and the dam sitting upon the young, or upon the eggs, thou shalt not take the dam with the young:” (Deuteronomy 22:6 KJV)

Today’s group of members from the “Ducks Plus” family, the Anatidae, are all from one Genus. The Anas according to Wikionary is: ” A taxonomic genus within the family Anatidae – various species of dabbling duck. These are probably the most common group of ducks many of us see.  The genus name is the Latin for “duck”. It includes mallards, wigeons, teals, pintails and shovelers in a number of subgenera. “Dabbling” is where the duck upends itself to feed. They feed mainly on water plants, which they obtain by tipping-up in shallows—uncommonly by diving (with opened wings); they often forage near the shore for seeds and insects. The bill is flat and broad, the hindtoe unlobed. Dabbling ducks float high in the water and are swift fliers, leaping upward on noisy wings before attaining level flight, usually in compact flocks.

Blue-Winged-Teal-Dabbling ©Flyways USFWS

Blue-Winged-Teal-Dabbling ©Flyways USFWS

The mallard (/ˈmælɑːrd/ or /ˈmælərd/) or wild duck (Anas platyrhynchos) is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and subtropical Americas, Europe, Asia, and North Africa, and has been introduced to New Zealand, Australia, Peru, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, the Falkland Islands and South Africa. This duck belongs to the subfamily Anatinae of the waterfowl family Anatidae.

The male birds (drakes) have a glossy green head and are grey on wings and belly, while the females (hens or ducks) have mainly brown-speckled plumage. Both sexes have an area of white-bordered black speculum feathers which commonly also include iridescent blue feathers especially among males. Mallards live in wetlands, eat water plants and small animals, and are social animals preferring to congregate in groups or flocks of varying sizes. This species is the main ancestor of most breeds of domesticated ducks. I personally think that this duck, the Mallard, was on board the Ark. He seems to have obey the command to:

“Go forth of the ark, thou, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons’ wives with thee. Bring forth with thee every living thing that is with thee, of all flesh, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth; that they may breed abundantly in the earth, and be fruitful, and multiply upon the earth.” (Genesis 8:16-17 KJV)

Mallard Duck Family ©WikiC ©WikiC

Mallard Duck Family ©WikiC

The mallard was one of the many bird species originally described by Carl Linnaeus in his 18th-century work Systema Naturae, and still bears its original binomial name. The scientific name is from Latin Anas, “duck” and Ancient Greek platyrhynchus , “broad-billed” ( from platus, “broad” and rhunkhos, ” bill”).

But the Mallard is not the only duck in this genus, Anas. There are 48 others. As mentioned, much interbreeding has taken place, and eventually these were raised to species status. After showing you the Wood Ducks last week, their is another beauty from the Lord in this week’s group.

Baikal Teal (Anas formosa) ©WikiC

Baikal Teal (Anas formosa) ©WikiC

We have seen this Teal, but not in that breeding outfit.

Baikal Teal (Anas formosa) Zoo Miami by Lee

Baikal Teal (Anas formosa) Zoo Miami by Lee

Unfortunately this genus contains “some of the world’s finest game birds: the black duck(Anas rubripes), much sought after by hunters; the mallard; the gadwall(Anas strepera); the garganey (A. querquedula); the pintail (A. acuta), perhaps the world’s most abundant waterfowl; the shoveler (Anas, or Spatula, clypeata), the “spoonbill” of hunters; the teals, races of Anas crecca and other species; the wigeons, Anas, or Mareca, americana and A.,or M., penelope. (Enclopeaedia Britannica) As you all know, I am a birdwatcher/photographer, not a hunter. I realize hunter organizations do much to maintain hunting areas and prevent over-hunting. That is a good thing, but not my “cup of tea.”

Here is a of each by last name:

Teals do not totally submerge when feeding and are often seen with just their rears showing as the search for food. Because of their feeding method, teals are more buoyant than diving ducks.

Cape Teal (Anas capensis), Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), Cinnamon Teal (Anas cyanoptera), Bernier’s Teal (Anas bernieri), Mascarene Teal (Anas theodori), Sunda Teal (Anas gibberifrons), Andaman Teal (Anas albogularis), Grey Teal (Anas gracilis), Chestnut Teal (Anas castanea), Auckland Teal (Anas aucklandica), Campbell Teal (Anas nesiotis), Brown Teal (Anas chlorotis), Red-billed Teal (Anas erythrorhyncha), Yellow-billed Teal (Anas flavirostris), Andean Teal (Anas andium), Baikal Teal (Anas formosa), Eurasian Teal (Anas crecca), Green-winged Teal (Anas carolinensis), Silver Teal (Anas versicolor), Puna Teal (Anas puna), Hottentot Teal (Anas hottentota)
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 Gadwall (Anas strepera) by Nikhil Devasar

Gadwall (Anas strepera) by Nikhil Devasar

The gadwall is a quieter duck, except during its courtship display.

Gadwall (Anas strepera)
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Falcated Duck (Anas falcata) at Wings of Asia by Lee

Falcated Duck (Anas falcata) at Wings of Asia by Lee

Ducks are mostly aquatic birds, mostly smaller than the swans and geese, and may be found in both fresh water and sea water.
Falcated Duck (Anas falcata), African Black Duck (Anas sparsa), American Black Duck (Anas rubripes), Mottled Duck (Anas fulvigula), Mexican Duck (Anas diazi), Hawaiian Duck (Anas wyvilliana), Laysan Duck (Anas laysanensis), Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica), Pacific Black Duck (Anas superciliosa), Indian Spot-billed Duck (Anas poecilorhyncha), Eastern Spot-billed Duck (Anas zonorhyncha), Yellow-billed Duck (Anas undulata), Meller’s Duck (Anas melleri)
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Mallards by Dan

Mallards by Dan

The male mallards (drakes) have a glossy green head and are grey on wings and belly, while the females (hens or ducks) have mainly brown-speckled plumage.
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
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American Wigeon (Anas americana) by Daves BirdingPix

American Wigeon (Anas americana) by Daves BirdingPix

The wigeons are similarly shaped, with a steep forehead and bulbous rear to the head.

Chiloe Wigeon (Anas sibilatrix), Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope), American Wigeon (Anas americana), Amsterdam Wigeon (Anas marecula),
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Northern Shoveler Male Close Up

Northern Shoveler Male Close Up

The shovelers (American English), or shovellers (British English), are four species of dabbling ducks with long, broad spatula-shaped beaks:

Cape Shoveler (Anas smithii), Red Shoveler (Anas platalea), Australasian Shoveler (Anas rhynchotis), Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata)
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Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) ©USFWS

Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) ©USFWS

The Pintail is a large duck, and the male’s long central tail feathers give rise to the species’ English and scientific names.

White-cheeked Pintail (Anas bahamensis), Yellow-billed Pintail (Anas georgica), Northern Pintail (Anas acuta), Eaton’s Pintail (Anas eatoni)
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Garganey (Anas querquedula) by Nikhil Devasar

Garganey (Anas querquedula) by Nikhil Devasar

Garganey (Anas querquedula)
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“And the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew. So when they had rowed about five and twenty or thirty furlongs, they see Jesus walking on the sea, and drawing nigh unto the ship: and they were afraid. But he saith unto them, It is I; be not afraid.” (John 6:18-20 KJV)

“Ship Ahoy”~  from “Great is Thy Faithfulness” by Dr. Richard Gregory

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More Sunday Inspirations

Sharing The Gospel

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Sunday Inspiration – Passeriformes Review III

Painted Bunting Subspecies (Passerina ciris ciris) ©WikiC

Painted Bunting Subspecies (Passerina ciris ciris) ©WikiC

Today we finish the Review of the Passeriformes Order of birds. These are the perching and songbird that are spread around the world for us to enjoy. You can check on the other two reviews with the links at the end of this article. This is the last of the 131 Families currently in this order.

And the lords of the Philistines passed in review by hundreds and by thousands, but David and his men passed in review at the rear with Achish. (1 Samuel 29:2 NKJV)

This verse in I Samuel 29:2 mentions the “lords of the Philistines passed in review by hundreds and by thousands,” That verse has nothing to do with our birds, but we have passed before your eyes for months a review of these beautifully created birds from our Lord. With over 6,000 in the Passerinformes order, they have gone by week after week adding up to hundreds and thousands. I trust you have learned to appreciate the variety and splendor of many of them. Yet, there were some, like the “common, plain” birds that are still there to be enjoyed.

House Sparrow by Ray

House Sparrow by Ray

Just as none of us are “plain” or “common”, God loves us all.

“Are not five sparrows sold for two copper coins? And not one of them is forgotten before God.” (Luke 12:6 NKJV)

Here is the last part of the families in this Order. They continue in the Taxonomic order.

Leiothrichidae – Laughingthrushes
Sylviidae – Sylviid Babblers
Zosteropidae – White-eyes
Arcanatoridae – Dapple-throat and allies
Promeropidae – Sugarbirds
Irenidae – Fairy-bluebirds
Regulidae – Goldcrests, Kinglets
Elachuridae – Elachuras
Hyliotidae – Hyliotas
Troglodytidae – Wrens
Polioptilidae – Gnatcatchers
Sittidae – Nuthatches
Tichodromidae – Wallcreeper
Certhiidae – Treecreepers
Mimidae – Mockingbirds, Thrashers
Sturnidae – Starlings, Rhabdornis
Buphagidae – Oxpeckers
Turdidae – Thrushes
Muscicapidae – Chats, Old World Flycatchers (320)
Cinclidae – Dippers
Chloropseidae – Leafbirds
Dicaeidae – Flowerpeckers
Nectariniidae – Sunbirds
Passeridae – Old World Sparrows, Snowfinches
Ploceidae – Weavers, Widowbirds
Estrildidae – Waxbills, Munias and allies
Viduidae – Indigobirds, Whydahs
Peucedramidae – Olive Warbler
Prunellidae – Accentors
Motacillidae – Wagtails, Pipits
Urocynchramidae – Przevalski’s Finch
Fringillidae – Finches
Parulidae – New World Warblers
Incertae-Sedis2 – Family Uncertain-Wrenthrush and Chat
Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles and Blackbirds
Coerebidae – Bananaquit
Emberizidae – Buntings, New World Sparrows and allies
Thraupidae – Tanagers and allies
Calcariidae – Longspurs, Snow Buntings
Cardinalidae – Cardinals, Grosbeaks and allies

Sumatran Laughingthrush (Garrulax bicolor) by Dan at Wing of Asia Zoo Miami

Sumatran Laughingthrush (Garrulax bicolor) by Dan at Wing of Asia Zoo Miami

A list of the Sunday Inspirations about these families. Mr. Joe Cool, as I call him, is one of my favorite Laughingthrushes.

Laughingthrush – Leiothrichidae Family ~ “Ten Thousand Joys” ~ Choir – Lisa Brock – Jessie Padgett (Faith Baptist)

Sylviid Babblers ~ “I Stand Amazed” ~ Faith Baptist Choir

White Eyes ~ “Come, Look To Jesus” ~ Played by Jill Foster at Faith Baptist (during Communion)

Seven Small Families ~ “All Hail The Power” – Faith Baptist Orchestra

Wrens ~ “He is Everything To Me” – Men’s Ensemble – Faith Baptist

Nuthatches and Creepers ~ “How Deep Is Your Love?” – Played by Jill Foster (Faith Baptist)

Mockingbirds and Thrashers ~ “I Am Loved” ~ Faith Baptist Orchestra

Starlings, Mynas and Rhabdornis ~ “Once Upon A Tree” ~ Choir – and – “Sing To Jesus” ~ Angel Long & Jessie Padgett

Oxpeckers and Thrushes ~ “I Heard The Bells With Peace On Earth” – with Jessie Padgett, Angel Long and the FX Girls

Chats and Old World Flycatchers I ~ “Wise Men Still Seek Him” – Trio and Choir

Chats and Old World Flycatchers II ~ “The Birthday of a King” ~ by Dr. Richard Gregory, now in Glory

Chats and Old World Flycatchers III ~ O Come, O Come Emmanuel”  by Meagan Fee on Violin and Jill Foster accompanying

Dippers, Leafbirds and Flowerpeckers ~ Faith Medley” – Faith Baptist Choir

Sunbirds and Spiderhunters ~ “The Fountain” Harp — 9-year-old Alisa Sadikova – Video

Old World Sparrows ~ “His Eye Is On The Sparrow” – Don Marsh Orchestra

Weavers and Allies ~ “Jesus What A Might Name” – Pastor Jerry w/Choir and Orchestra

Waxwings and Allies I ~ “My Jesus I Love Thee” – by Meagan Fee (didn’t work 1st time-fixed)

Waxwings and Allies II ~ “My Jesus I Love Thee” – by Meagan Fee at Faith Baptist

Some Small Families ~ “Little Prayers” – by the ©The Hyssongs

Wagtails and Pipits ~ “Glorious Love” – Choir, Orchestra, Solo by Pastor Jerry

Finches I ~ “Mercies Anew” ~ by Lisa Brock, accompanied by Jill Foster

Finches II ~ “My Faith Has Found A Resting Place” ~ ©Artisans in Brass (Psalms, Hymns & Spiritual Songs-Album) Used with permission

Finches III ~ “Shout To The North and the South” ~ by Faith Baptist Church Choir

Finches IV ~ “Once Upon A Tree” ~ by Faith Baptist Church Choir

New World Warblers – I ~ “How Can I Keep From Singing?” ~ Pastor Jerry Smith, Reagan, Caleb and Jessie

New World Warblers – II ~ “Heavenly Sunlight” ~ by Artisans in Brass

Three Small Families ~ “I’ll Be a Friend to Jesus” ~ Faith Baptist Quartet

Icteridae Family I ~ I’ll Stand Up and Say So” – by the ©The Hyssongs

Icteridae Family II ~ “It Is Well With My Soul” ~ by Sean Fielder

Icteridae Family III ~ “Stay Close To Me” ~ ©Hyssongs

Emberizidae’s – Buntings ~ “Triumphantly The Church Will Rise” ~ Faith Baptist Men’s Quintet

Emberizidae – Part II ~ “His Eye Is On The Sparrow” ~ by Kathy Lisby at Faith Baptist

Emberizidae Family Allies I ~ “Be Thou My Vision” ~ by Ladies and Girls Choir on Mother’s Day

Emberizidae Family Allies II ~ “Worthy The Lamb” – Faith Baptist Choir and Orchestra

Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies I – “My Jesus I Love Thee” ~ Faith Baptist Orchestra

Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies II – “My Faith Still Holds” ~ Faith Baptist Orchestra

Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies III – “Jesus Paid It All” – Men’s Father’s Day Choir and “While The Ages Roll” –  Men’s Quartet

Thraupidae – Tanagers and Allies IV – “El Shaddai” ~ by Nell Reese

Thraupidae – Dacnis, Honeycreepers, Conebills ~ “Amazing Grace” and “I Love You, Written in Red” – – Orchestra & Choir (Faith Baptist Church)

Thraupidae – Flowerpiercers, Sierra Finches, Plus ~ “Your Grace is Sufficient” ~ Special by Courtney Love – Flute

Inca, Warbling and Various Finches ~ “Quiet Rest” and “Sweet Hour of Prayer” ~  by Kathy Lisby – Nell Reese acc. on piano.

Thraupidae Tanagers and Allies  VIII ~ “And Can It Be” – Sung by Angel Long and acc. Sean Fielder*

Thraupidae Tanagers and Allies Finale ~ “Hallelujah For The Cross” ~ by Jessie Padgett

Calcariidae – Longspurs and Snow Buntings ~ “House on A Rock” ~ by the Summer Kid’s Choir

Cardinalidae Family of Cardinals Plus ~ “Written in Red” – Orchestra & Choir

Cardinalidae Wrap-up ~ “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” ~ Choir and Orchestra

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“And, behold, God himself is with us for our captain,” (2 Chronicles 13:12a KJV)

“Ship Ahoy ~ by Dr. Richard Gregory

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Sunday Inspiration – Passeriformes Review I

Sunday Inspiration – Passeriformes Review II

More Sunday Inspirations

Sunday Inspiration – Out To Sea

Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) by Ian

Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) by Ian

Oh, that men would give thanks to the LORD for His goodness, And for His wonderful works to the children of men! Let them sacrifice the sacrifices of thanksgiving, And declare His works with rejoicing. Those who go down to the sea in ships, Who do business on great waters, They see the works of the LORD, And His wonders in the deep. (Psalms 107:21-24 NKJV)

Those who go out to sea are able to see many of the birds that spend most of their lives on the wing. The oceans do not always remain calm, but their Creator has created them to survive many varied conditions. How about us? As things come into our lives, they are not always comfortable to us. If we are placing our faith in the Creator, the Lord Jesus Christ, we can sing the last verse of the hymn below:

O soul, sinking down ’neath sin’s merciless wave,
The strong arm of our Captain is mighty to save;
Then trust Him today, no longer delay,
Board the old ship of Zion, and shout on your way:
“Jesus saves! Jesus saves!”
Shout and sing on your way: “Jesus saves!”

 

 

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“Ship Ahoy” ~ by Dr. Richard Gregory

And, behold, God himself is with us for our captain, (2 Chronicles 13:12a KJV)

I was drifting away on life’s pitiless sea,
And the angry waves threatened my ruin to be,
When away at my side, there I dimly descried,
A stately old vessel, and loudly I cried:
“Ship ahoy! Ship ahoy!”
And loudly I cried: “Ship ahoy!”

’Twas the “old ship of Zion,” thus sailing along,
All aboard her seemed joyous, I heard their sweet song;
And the Captain’s kind ear, ever ready to hear,
Caught my wail of distress, as I cried out in fear:
“Ship ahoy! Ship ahoy!”
As I cried out in fear: “Ship ahoy!”

The good Captain commanded a boat to be low’red,
And with tender compassion He took me on board;
And I’m happy today, all my sins washed away
In the blood of my Savior, and now I can say:
“Bless the Lord! Bless the Lord!”
From my soul I can say: “Bless the Lord!”

O soul, sinking down ’neath sin’s merciless wave,
The strong arm of our Captain is mighty to save;
Then trust Him today, no longer delay,
Board the old ship of Zion, and shout on your way:
“Jesus saves! Jesus saves!”
Shout and sing on your way: “Jesus saves!”

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More Sunday Inspirations

Gospel Message

Sharing The Gospel

Gideon

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