Lee’s Two Word Tuesday – 8/16/2016

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Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi) ©Flickr Paul and Cathy

THE SPEECH

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“And the speech pleased the Lord, that Solomon had asked this thing.” (1 Kings 3:10 KJV)

Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi) ©Flickr Paul and Cathy

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More Daily Devotionals

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King Solomon and The Birds – Part 1

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Peter Ericsson

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Peter Ericsson

King Solomon and The Birds ~ from The Curious Book of Birds

KING SOLOMON AND THE BIRDS – Part 1

letter-kING SOLOMON was wiser than all men, and his fame was in all nations round about Jerusalem. He was so wise that he knew every spoken language; yes, but more than this, he could talk with everything that lived, trees and flowers, beasts and fowls, creeping things and fishes. What a very pleasant thing that was for Solomon, to be sure! And how glad one would be nowadays to have such knowledge!

Solomon was especially fond of birds, and loved to talk with them because their voices were so sweet and they spoke such beautiful words. One day the wise King was chatting pleasantly with the birds who lived in his wonderful garden, and these are some of the things which he heard them say. The Nightingale, the sweetest singer of all, chanted,—

“Contentment is the greatest happiness.”

“It would be better for most people never to have been born,” crooned the melancholy Turtle-Dove.

The happy little Swallow gave her opinion,—”Do good and you will be rewarded hereafter.”

The harsh cry of the Peacock meant, “As thou judgest so shalt thou be judged.”

The Hoopoe said, “He who has no pity for others will find none for himself.”

The cynical old Crow croaked disagreeably, “The further away from men I am, the better I am pleased.”

Last of all the Cock who sings in the morning chanted his joyous song,—”Think of your Creator, O foolish creatures!”

When they had finished talking King Solomon softly stroked the head of the pretty little Dove and bade her cheer up, for life was not so dreadful a thing, after all. And he gave her permission to build her nest under the walls of the great Temple which he was building, the most beautiful, golden house in the whole world. Some years afterward the Doves had so increased in numbers that with their extended wings they formed a veil over the numberless pilgrims who came to Jerusalem to visit the wonderful Temple.

But of all the winged singers who spoke that day in the garden, the wise King chose to have ever near him the Cock, because he had spoken words of piety, and the nimble Hoopoe, because he was able to plunge his clear gaze into the depths of the earth as if it were made of transparent glass and discover the places where springs of living water were hidden under the soil. It was very convenient for Solomon, when he was traveling, to have some one with him who was able to find water in whatsoever place he might be resting.

Thus the Cock and the Hoopoe became Solomon’s closest companions; but of the two the Hoopoe was his favorite. The Hoopoe is an Eastern bird and we do not see him in America. He is about as big as a Jay, colored a beautiful reddish gray, with feathers of purple, brown, and white, and his black wings are banded with white. But the peculiar thing about a Hoopoe is his crown of tawny feathers, a tall crown for so small a bird. And this is the story of the Hoopoe’s crown.

King Solomon and The Birds – Part 2

King Solomon and The Birds – Part 3


Lee’s Addition:

I will praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; Marvelous are Your works, And that my soul knows very well. (Psalms 139:14 NKJV)

I delight to do Your will, O my God, And Your law is within my heart.” (Psalms 40:8 NKJV)

The Bible tells us that we are to be content with the way the Lord made us and we should delight or be happy to do what the Lord wants. That also includes doing what your parents want you to do.

Links:

Eurasian Hoopoe (Upupa epops) by Peter Ericsson

 

 

  Hoopoes – Upupidae Family

 

 

Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) ©©Flickr

 

 

  Bird Tales

 

 

 

Curious Book of Birds - Cover

 

 

  The Curious Book of Birds

 

 

Spanish Sparrow (Passer Hispaniolensis) female ©WikiC

  

 

 

  Wordless Birds

 

Bible Birds – Solomon’s Wisdom About Birds I

Australian Raven (Corvus coronoides) by Ian

Australian Raven (Corvus coronoides) by Ian

Also he spoke of trees, from the cedar tree of Lebanon even to the hyssop that springs out of the wall; he spoke also of animals, of birds, of creeping things, and of fish. (1 Kings 4:33 NKJV)

In my daily reading from Scripture recently, I came across I Kings 4:33 again. The article Birds of the Bible – Solomon’s Birds, discusses how some of the lessons Solomon had learned were applied. Now let’s look at how Solomon might have attained those illustrations and how we can apply them.

More questions come to my mind, in no set order, like:

  • What kind of birds did he have to observe?
  • What did he learn about the birds?
  • Did he write any of his bird observations out?
  • The Lord gave him the wisdom, so how did he apply it?
  • What can we learn from Solomon about birds?

We know from the Bible that Solomon asked for wisdom to be able to know right and wrong and how to rule the people. God granted Solomon his request and gave him more besides. See I Kings 3.

Checking with my e-Sword commentaries and helps, here are some interesting thoughts. (Italics are mine)

Oriental Bay Owl (Phodilus badius) by Peter Ericisson

Oriental Bay Owl (Phodilus badius) by Peter Ericisson

Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary

Solomon’s wisdom was more his glory than his wealth. He had what is here called largeness of heart, for the heart is often put for the powers of the mind. He had the gift of talk, as well as wisdom. It is very desirable, that those who have large gifts of any kind, should have large hearts to use them for the good of others. What treasures of wisdom and knowledge are lost! But every sort of knowledge that is needful for salvation is to be found in the holy Scriptures. There came persons from all parts, who were more eager after knowledge than their neighbours, to hear the wisdom of Solomon. Solomon was herein a type of Christ, in whom are hid all treasures of wisdom and knowledge; and hid for us, for he is made of God to us, wisdom. Christ’s fame shall spread through all the earth, and men of all nations shall come to him, learn of him, and take upon them his easy yoke, and find rest for their souls.

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Gill

he spake also of beasts, and of fowls, and of creeping things, and of fishes; he understood the nature of all sorts of animals in the earth, air, and sea, and discoursed of their names, kinds, qualities, and use, with the greatest ease and perspicuity; the Jews fancy that Aristotle’s History of Animals is his, which that philosopher came upon, and published it in his own name. …

Sandhill Cranes - Adult and Juvenile in yard 8/27/10

Sandhill Cranes – Adult and Juvenile in yard 8/27/10

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Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) ©TexasEagle

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) ©TexasEagle

Barnes

Of beasts, and of fowls, and of creeping things, and of fishes – This is the usual Biblical division of the animal kingdom Gen_1:26; Gen_9:2; Psa_148:10.

Believer’s Bible Commentary

Verse 33 means that his wide knowledge of many sciences enabled him to use object lessons from nature in expounding his wisdom. People traveled from afar to hear him.

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus somptuosus) by Ian

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus somptuosus) by Ian

Bible Knowledge Commentary

1 Kings 4:32-34

Several hundred of Solomon’s 3,000 proverbs have been preserved in the Book of Proverbs as well as a few in Ecclesiastes. One of his 1,005 songs is the Song of Songs. Solomon’s literary output was extremely prolific (bountiful). He became an authority in botany and zoology too. … He was recognized as the wisest man of his day as God had promised he would be.

Under His Wings - (Dove - photographer unknown)

Under His Wings – (Dove – photographer unknown)

Biblical Illustrator

The study of Nature
It is said of Wordsworth that a stranger having on one occasion asked to see his study, the maid said, “This is master’s room, but he studies in the fields.” In doing so the poet followed a venerable example. We read that Isaac went out to meditate in the field at eventide, where in the margin “to pray” is put for “to meditate.” Nor could there be a better place either for prayer or for study than the fields. The Word of God is written very clearly for His seers in the green book of Nature. Wordsworth’s study is one that we can all use, however small our house may be. (Quiver.)

The world is worth seeing
Men must not live under a bushel. A gentleman once met a French priest on board an Atlantic liner. They entered into conversation, and the priest said that months ago he had a dream. He dreamt that he was dead, and that God asked him how much of the world he had seem His answer was that he had seen only a very little of it, for he had been so long in preparing for death, and in helping other people to die, that he had no time to see the world. He saw that God was displeased, and on awakening he resolved to see as much of this beautiful world as he could. It was a wise resolve. The earth is the Lord’s and not the devil’s, and we have no right to ignore it. Nature is a temple of God, and we must ever walk through it in a sacramental mood. (Sunday Circle.).

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

K & D

“And of beasts and birds, of creeping things and fishes;” the four principal classes into which the Hebrews divided the animal kingdom. Speaking of plants and animals presupposes observations and researches in natural science, or botanical and zoological studies.

Kingfisher Feeding Young by Phil Kwong

Kingfisher Feeding Young by Phil Kwong

McGee

We are told that Solomon spoke three thousand proverbs. We have only a few hundred recorded in the Bible. His songs were a thousand and five. Believe me, he was a song writer. We have only one of his songs, The Song of Solomon. Solomon was a dendrologist—”He spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall.” The hyssop is a humble little plant that grows on rocks. Solomon was also a zoologist—”he spake also of beasts”—and an ornithologist since he spoke of birds. He was an entomologist: he spoke of creeping things, or insects. He was an ichthyologist: he spoke of fishes. He spoke of these things because he had studied them and was an authority in these particular realms. This, apparently, is the beginning of the sciences. Solomon was interested in these things.

Some Answers

I have another Commentary to share thoughts from, but will save it for Part II. For now, let’s see if any of the first questions were answered.

The first two questions are unanswered for now. We will dig into that later. The next three seem to have some answers.

  • What kind of birds did he have to observe?
  • What did he learn about the birds?
  • Did he write any of his bird observations out?
  • The Lord gave him the wisdom, so how did he apply it?
  • What can we learn from Solomon about birds?

Solomon observed the birds and seems to have learned lessons and applications from them which are seen in Proverbs, Song of Solomon and some Psalms. So he recorded his findings. He gained his knowledge from the Lord, but he used his senses and observational skills to gain more knowledge. That is something we can do also with the Lord’s help. If we don’t apply ourselves to a topic, the knowledge is not going to just “pop” into our heads.

See:

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Bible Birds – Peacocks I

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

For the king had at sea a navy of Tharshish with the navy of Hiram: once in three years came the navy of Tharshish, bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks. (1 Kings 10:22 KJV)For the king’s ships went to Tarshish with the servants of Huram: every three years once came the ships of Tarshish bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks. (2 Chronicles 9:21 KJV)

(Relocated)

Birds of the Bible – Peacocks II

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

For the king had at sea a navy of Tharshish with the navy of Hiram: once in three years came the navy of Tharshish, bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks. (1 Kings 10:22 KJV)

For the king’s ships went to Tarshish with the servants of Huram: every three years once came the ships of Tarshish bringing gold, and silver, ivory, and apes, and peacocks. (2 Chronicles 9:21 KJV)

In my reading today in I Kings 10, I came to the peacocks arriving to Israel via the Navy of Tharshish or Tarshish. We have written about them in Birds of the Bible – Peacocks (2008) and Birds of the Bible – Pied Peacock and Allies (2011). It’s time to see what else can be discovered about these beautifully created birds by the Lord.

Peacock Feather

Peacock Feather

We know He, The LORD, questioned Job about the Peacocks “goodly wings” in Job 39.

Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich? (Job 39:13 KJV)

Now, in I Kings and II Chronicles, the Peacocks are arriving in ships by the Navy of Tharshish. It appears that every three years those ships arrived with its precious cargos. Where had the ships gone to collect these items. There is speculation by some writers that the ships went west to Spain and other think in another way toward India and areas in that direction. The Bible does not say, so, we really don’t know.

Does that make you curious? It make me wonder where they found those peacocks.

Checking the history of Peacocks from CreationWiki and Wikipedia, they say that there are two species of Peafowl from Asia and one species from Africa. Is that were they got these Peacocks mentioned here in Scripture? When you are reading the Bible, do questions like this every give you an urge to dig a little deeper?

First, the “Peacocks” are the males. The females are called “Peafowl” and their chicks are called “Peachicks.”  Collectively the birds are called Peafowl. They all belong to the Phasianidae – Pheasants, Fowl & Allies Family.

The two species from India-Asia are the Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus)

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

and the Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus).

Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus) by Ian

Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus) by Ian

The African member of the family is the Congo Peacock (Afropavo congensis).

Congo Peacock (Afropavo congensis) M F ©WikiC

Congo Peacock (Afropavo congensis) M F ©WikiC

Here are some of the thought of various commentaries:

JFB – once in three years — that is, every third year. Without the mariner’s compass they had to coast along the shore. The ivory, apes, and peacocks might have been purchased, on the outward or homeward voyage, on the north coast of Africa, where the animals were to be found. They were particularized, probably as being the rarest articles on board.

Geneva – By Tharshish is meant Cilicia, which was abundant in the variety of precious things.

Darby – 1 Kings 10:1-29 – The king of Tyre also was dependent on the king of Israel; and the queen of Sheba comes from the far south to delight herself in the wisdom of the head of God’s people, and to be filled with wonder at the sight of his glory, and to praise Jehovah who had raised him so high, and who had blessed the people in giving him to be their king. She also came with gifts; for the king’s renown had spread into distant lands. Nevertheless, although it was a true report that she had heard, the sight of his glory went far beyond all that had been said of it.

Constable – God forbade Israel’s kings from multiplying chariots (1Ki_10:26), the most effective and dreaded military machines of their day (Deu_17:16). God wanted His people to depend on Him primarily for their protection. Material prosperity and security often lead people to conclude that they have no needs when really our need for God never diminishes. Solomon fell into this trap. Wealth is not sinful in itself, but it does bring temptations with it (cf. Jam_5:1-6).

Though Solomon experienced great blessings from his faithful God, he fell prey to the sins these blessings make easier, as the writer explained in the next chapter.

Barnes – This is given as the reason of the great bountifulness of silver in the time of Solomon. The “navy of Tharshish” (not the same as the navy of Ophir, 1Ki_9:26) must therefore have imported very large quantities of that metal. Tharshish, or Tartessus, in Spain, had the richest silver mines known in the ancient world, and had a good deal of gold also; apes and ivory were produced by the opposite coast of Africa; and, if north Africa did not produce “peacocks,” which is uncertain, she may have produced the birds called here “tukkiyim,” which some translate “parrots,” others “guinea-fowl” – the latter being a purely African bird. The etymology of the Hebrew words here rendered “ivory,” “apes,” and “peacocks,” is uncertain; but even if of Indian origin, the Jews may have derived their first knowledge of ivory, apes, and peacocks, through nations which traded with India, and may thus have got the words into their language long before the time of Solomon. The names once fixed would be retained, whatever the quarter from where the things were procured afterward.

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) at Cincinnati Zoo by Lee

We have no clear idea of where they came from, and it really does not matter other than we are told they came by ship. We know that Solomon was the wisest and wealthiest king because God promised him back when he prayed for wisdom.

And now, O LORD my God, thou hast made thy servant king instead of David my father: and I am but a little child: I know not how to go out or come in….. Give therefore thy servant an understanding heart to judge thy people, that I may discern between good and bad: for who is able to judge this thy so great a people? And the speech pleased the Lord, that Solomon had asked this thing. And God said unto him, Because thou hast asked this thing, and hast not asked for thyself long life; neither hast asked riches for thyself, nor hast asked the life of thine enemies; but hast asked for thyself understanding to discern judgment; Behold, I have done according to thy words: lo, I have given thee a wise and an understanding heart; so that there was none like thee before thee, neither after thee shall any arise like unto thee. And I have also given thee that which thou hast not asked, both riches, and honour: so that there shall not be any among the kings like unto thee all thy days. And if thou wilt walk in my ways, to keep my statutes and my commandments, as thy father David did walk, then I will lengthen thy days. (1 Kings 3:7-14 KJV)

(Javan) Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus muticus) by Lee at Zoo Miami

(Javan) Green Peafowl (Pavo muticus muticus) by Lee at Zoo Miami

Wow! Is that not true of those of us who know the Lord? The Lord answers our prayers many times by giving us much more than we ever asked for. As long as our prayers are in line with His Word.

That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith; that ye, being rooted and grounded in love, May be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height; And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God. Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us, (Ephesians 3:17-20 KJV)

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Birds of the Bible – Solomon’s Wisdom About Birds I

Australian Raven (Corvus coronoides) by Ian

Australian Raven (Corvus coronoides) by Ian

Also he spoke of trees, from the cedar tree of Lebanon even to the hyssop that springs out of the wall; he spoke also of animals, of birds, of creeping things, and of fish. (1 Kings 4:33 NKJV)

In my daily reading from Scripture recently, I came across I Kings 4:33 again. The article Birds of the Bible – Solomon’s Birds, discusses how some of the lessons Solomon had learned were applied. Now let’s look at how Solomon might have attained those illustrations and how we can apply them.

More questions come to my mind, in no set order, like:

  • What kind of birds did he have to observe?
  • What did he learn about the birds?
  • Did he write any of his bird observations out?
  • The Lord gave him the wisdom, so how did he apply it?
  • What can we learn from Solomon about birds?

We know from the Bible that Solomon asked for wisdom to be able to know right and wrong and how to rule the people. God granted Solomon his request and gave him more besides. See I Kings 3.

Checking with my e-Sword commentaries and helps, here are some interesting thoughts. (Italics are mine)

Oriental Bay Owl (Phodilus badius) by Peter Ericisson

Oriental Bay Owl (Phodilus badius) by Peter Ericisson

Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary

Solomon’s wisdom was more his glory than his wealth. He had what is here called largeness of heart, for the heart is often put for the powers of the mind. He had the gift of utterance, as well as wisdom. It is very desirable, that those who have large gifts of any kind, should have large hearts to use them for the good of others. What treasures of wisdom and knowledge are lost! But every sort of knowledge that is needful for salvation is to be found in the holy Scriptures. There came persons from all parts, who were more eager after knowledge than their neighbours, to hear the wisdom of Solomon. Solomon was herein a type of Christ, in whom are hid all treasures of wisdom and knowledge; and hid for us, for he is made of God to us, wisdom. Christ’s fame shall spread through all the earth, and men of all nations shall come to him, learn of him, and take upon them his easy yoke, and find rest for their souls.

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) by Nikhil Devasar

Gill

he spake also of beasts, and of fowls, and of creeping things, and of fishes; he understood the nature of all sorts of animals in the earth, air, and sea, and discoursed of their names, kinds, qualities, and use, with the greatest ease and perspicuity; the Jews fancy that Aristotle’s History of Animals is his, which that philosopher came upon, and published it in his own name. …

Sandhill Cranes - Adult and Juvenile in yard 8/27/10

Sandhill Cranes – Adult and Juvenile in yard 8/27/10

MacLaren

But the main thing to notice is that in Solomon we see exemplified the normal relation between religion and intellectual power and learning. Judge, artist, scientist, and all other thinkers and students, draw their power from God, and should use it for Him. And, on the other hand, Solomon’s example is a rebuke to those …Christians who look askance at men of learning, letters, or science, as well as to those … who think that science and religion must be sworn foes. If our religion is what it should be, it will widen our understanding all round.
‘Let knowledge grow from more to more, But more of reverence in us dwell.’

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) ©TexasEagle

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) ©TexasEagle

Barnes

Of beasts, and of fowls, and of creeping things, and of fishes – This is the usual Biblical division of the animal kingdom Gen_1:26; Gen_9:2; Psa_148:10.

Believer’s Bible Commentary

Verse 33 means that his wide knowledge of many sciences enabled him to use object lessons from nature in expounding his wisdom. People traveled from afar to hear him.

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus somptuosus) by Ian

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager (Anisognathus somptuosus) by Ian

Bible Knowledge Commentary

1 Kings 4:32-34

Several hundred of Solomon’s 3,000 proverbs have been preserved in the Book of Proverbs as well as a few in Ecclesiastes. One of his 1,005 songs is the Song of Songs. Solomon’s literary output was extremely prolific. He became an authority in botany and zoology too. … He was recognized as the wisest man of his day as God had promised he would be.

Under His Wings - (Dove - photographer unknown)

Under His Wings – (Dove – photographer unknown)

Biblical Illustrator

The study of Nature
It is said of Wordsworth that a stranger having on one occasion asked to see his study, the maid said, “This is master’s room, but he studies in the fields.” In doing so the poet followed a venerable example. We read that Isaac went out to meditate in the field at eventide, where in the margin “to pray” is put for “to meditate.” Nor could there be a better place either for prayer or for study than the fields. The Word of God is written very clearly for His seers in the green book of Nature. Wordsworth’s study is one that we can all use, however small our house may be. (Quiver.)

The world is worth seeing
Men must not live under a bushel. A gentleman once met a French priest on board an Atlantic liner. They entered into conversation, and the priest said that months ago he had a dream. He dreamt that he was dead, and that God asked him how much of the world he had seem His answer was that he had seen only a very little of it, for he had been so long in preparing for death, and in helping other people to die, that he had no time to see the world. He saw that God was displeased, and on awakening he resolved to see as much of this beautiful world as he could. It was a wise resolve. The earth is the Lord’s and not the devil’s, and we have no right to ignore it. Nature is a temple of God, and we must ever walk through it in a sacramental mood. (Sunday Circle.).

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

Green-billed Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) ©WikiC

K & D

“And of beasts and birds, of creeping things and fishes;” the four principal classes into which the Hebrews divided the animal kingdom. Speaking of plants and animals presupposes observations and researches in natural science, or botanical and zoological studies.

Kingfisher Feeding Young by Phil Kwong

Kingfisher Feeding Young by Phil Kwong

McGee

We are told that Solomon spoke three thousand proverbs. We have only a few hundred recorded in the Bible. His songs were a thousand and five. Believe me, he was a song writer. We have only one of his songs, The Song of Solomon. Solomon was a dendrologist—”He spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall.” The hyssop is a humble little plant that grows on rocks. Solomon was also a zoologist—”he spake also of beasts”—and an ornithologist since he spoke of birds. He was an entomologist: he spoke of creeping things, or insects. He was an ichthyologist: he spoke of fishes. He spoke of these things because he had studied them and was an authority in these particular realms. This, apparently, is the beginning of the sciences. Solomon was interested in these things.

Some Answers

I have another Commentary to share thoughts from, but will save it for Part II. For now, let’s see if any of the first questions were answered.

The first two questions are unanswered for now. We will dig into that later. The next three seem to have some answers.

  • What kind of birds did he have to observe?
  • What did he learn about the birds?
  • Did he write any of his bird observations out?
  • The Lord gave him the wisdom, so how did he apply it?
  • What can we learn from Solomon about birds?

Solomon observed the birds and seems to have learned lessons and applications from them which are seen in Proverbs, Song of Solomon and some Psalms. So he recorded his findings. He gained his knowledge from the Lord, but he used his senses and observational skills to gain more knowledge. That is something we can do also with the Lord’s help. If we don’t apply ourselves to a topic, the knowledge is not going to just “pop” into our heads.

See:

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Birds of the Bible – Solomon’s Birds

And God gave Solomon wisdom and exceedingly great understanding, and largeness of heart like the sand on the seashore. He spoke three thousand proverbs, and his songs were one thousand and five. Also he spoke of trees, from the cedar tree of Lebanon even to the hyssop that springs out of the wall; he spoke also of animals, of birds, of creeping things, and of fish. And men of all nations, from all the kings of the earth who had heard of his wisdom, came to hear the wisdom of Solomon. (1 Kings 4:29, 30,32-34)

While reading these verses lately, I began wondering what HAD Solomon written about the birds. Here is what I have found so far.

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Surely, in vain the net is spread In the sight of any bird; (Proverbs 1:17 NKJV)

From John Wesley’s Explanatory Notes “In vain – The fowler who spreads, his net in the sight of the bird looseth his labour. But these, are more foolish than the silly birds, and though they are not ignorant of the mischief which these evil courses will bring upon themselves, yet they will not take warning.”

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Deliver yourself like a gazelle from the hand of the hunter, And like a bird from the hand of the fowler. (Proverbs 6:5)

captive-eagleIf you get caught in a snare, struggle like the gazelle or bird to get free. Like Dave Ramsey said last evening on “Town Hall for Hope,” if things get bad get moving and exercise every effort to fix the problem. Don’t just wait for someone else to solve your problem. Don’t stay in the net of no hope.

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Till an arrow struck his liver. As a bird hastens to the snare, He did not know it would cost his life. (Proverbs 7:23)

This verse which tells of a bird being enticed into a trap, not knowing that it will kill it, comes in an illustration of a man enticed by an immoral woman. How many lives have been ruined this way. How many families have been lost.

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Like a bird that wanders from its nest Is a man who wanders from his place. (Proverbs 27:8)

This seems to almost go along with the verse above.

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Do not curse the king, even in your thought; Do not curse the rich, even in your bedroom; For a bird of the air may carry your voice, And a bird in flight may tell the matter. (Ecclesiastes 10:20 NKJV)

Now that is an interesting case of, “the little birdie told me so.”

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I returned and saw under the sun that– The race is not to the swift, Nor the battle to the strong, Nor bread to the wise, Nor riches to men of understanding, Nor favor to men of skill; But time and chance happen to them all. For man also does not know his time: Like fish taken in a cruel net, Like birds caught in a snare, So the sons of men are snared in an evil time, When it falls suddenly upon them. (Ecclesiastes 9:11-12)

Solomon in Ecclesiates changes to more of a “all is vanity” mode. I take this verse to mean that no matter whether you are strong, wise, rich, skillful, or otherwise, that things happen to all of us unexpectedly. All of us can get caught by a tornado, hurricane, flood, tsunami, and your status makes no difference to that circumstance. Even with the best preparations, things happen that are out of our control, but not God’s.

∞∞∞∞

Northern Mockingbird by Dan

Northern Mockingbird by Dan

Remember now your Creator in the days of your youth, Before the difficult days come, And the years draw near when you say, “I have no pleasure in them”: While the sun and the light, The moon and the stars, Are not darkened, And the clouds do not return after the rain; In the day when the keepers of the house tremble, And the strong men bow down; When the grinders cease because they are few, And those that look through the windows grow dim; When the doors are shut in the streets, And the sound of grinding is low; When one rises up at the sound of a bird, And all the daughters of music are brought low. Also they are afraid of height, And of terrors in the way; When the almond tree blossoms, The grasshopper is a burden, And desire fails. For man goes to his eternal home, And the mourners go about the streets. Remember your Creator before the silver cord is loosed, Or the golden bowl is broken, Or the pitcher shattered at the fountain, Or the wheel broken at the well. Then the dust will return to the earth as it was, And the spirit will return to God who gave it. (Ecclesiastes 12:1-7)

These verses remind us to “Remember now your Creator.” While we are young accept the Lord the Creator and learn of Him. One day you will be old, and things slow down, and you wake early at a birds singing (most likely a Mockingbird because they sing really early) while others that are young get a full nights rest. Or, it could be that a person is so afraid that even a bird’s song frightens them awake. Solomon is reminding us to keep the Creator foremost because one day we will return to dust.

All quotes are from NKJV.