Sunday Inspiration – Icteridae Family III

Yellow-shouldered Blackbird (Agelaius xanthomus) ©WikiC

Yellow-shouldered Blackbird (Agelaius xanthomus) ©WikiC

All flesh is not the same flesh: but there is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds. (1 Corinthians 15:39 KJV)

Today we finish up the Icteridae Family of New World blackbirds, New World orioles, the Bobolink, Meadowlarks, Grackles, Cowbirds, Oropendolas and Caciques, plus. Trust you enjoyed seeing the first two parts of the family. (Part I, Part II)

Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) ©WikiC

Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) ©WikiC

“All flesh is not the same flesh: but there is one kind of flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, and another of birds.” (1 Corinthians 15:39 KJV)

The last 64 members of the family come from numerous Genus; the Nesopsar, Agelaius, Molothrus, Dives,Ptiloxena, Euphagus, Quiscalus, Hypopyrrhus, Lampropsar, Gymnomystax, Macroagelaius, Macroagelaius, Curaeus, Amblyramphus, Anumara, Gnorimopsar, Oreopsar, Agelaioides, Chrysomus, Xanthopsar and the Pseudoleistes. Some have only one species per genus. For many of you, the genus names mean little, but, if we mention Cowbirds, Grackles, Blackbirds, Baywings and Marshbirds, then you would recognize them that way.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Blessed be the LORD, who hath not given us as a prey to their teeth. Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped. Our help is in the name of the LORD, who made heaven and earth. (Psalms 124:6-8 KJV)

“Stay Close To Me” ~ ©Hyssongs

*

Sunday Inspiration

Sunday Inspiration –  Icteridae Family I

Sunday Inspiration –  Icteridae Family II

Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles & Blackbirds Family

Icterid – Wikipedia

Falling Plates

*

Sunday Inspiration – Icteridae Family I

Yellow-hooded Blackbird (Chrysomus icterocephalus) ©Flickr Bob

Yellow-hooded Blackbird (Chrysomus icterocephalus) ©Flickr Bob

His head is like the finest gold; His locks are wavy, And black as a raven. (Song of Solomon 5:11 NKJV)

Most casual birdwatchers do not now the name of  Icteridae, but if I were to mention Blackbirds, Bobolink, Meadowlarks, Cacique, Orpendendolas, Orioles, Toupials, Grackles, Cowbirds, Baywings, and Marshbirds, you would have heard of them. Many in this Icteridae Family are very commonly seen. That is, if you live in the “New World” or Western Hemisphere, specifically the Americas (including nearby islands such as those of the Caribbean and Bermuda).

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) by J Fenton

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) by J Fenton

This family has 109 members presently (6.1 Version of I.O.C). Wikipedia says, “Icterids make up a family (Icteridae) of small to medium-sized, often colorful passerine birds restricted to the New World. Most species have black as a predominant plumage color, often enlivened by yellow, orange or red. The family is extremely varied in size, shape, behavior and coloration. The name, meaning “jaundiced ones” (from the prominent yellow feathers of many species) comes from the Ancient Greek ikteros, through the Latin ictericus.”

“Despite the similar names, the first groups are only distantly related to the Old World common blackbird (a thrush) or the Old World orioles.”

Venezuelan Troupial (Icterus icterus) ©©Cqueulat00

Venezuelan Troupial (Icterus icterus) ©©Cqueulat00

“Icterids have adapted to taking a wide range of foods. Oropendolas and caciques use their gaping motion to open the skins of fruit to obtain the soft insides, and have long bills adapted to the process. Others such as cowbirds and the bobolink have shorter stubbier bills for crushing seeds. The Jamaican blackbird uses its bill to pry amongst tree bark and epiphytes. Orioles will drink nectar.” (Wikipedia, with editing)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

For from you the word of the Lord has sounded forth, not only in Macedonia and Achaia, but also in every place. Your faith toward God has gone out, so that we do not need to say anything. (1 Thessalonians 1:8 NKJV)

“I’ll Stand Up and Say So” ~ ©Hyssongs from “Blessed” Album)

*

Sunday Inspiration

Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles & Blackbirds Family

Icterid – Wikipedia

Hope for Hard Times

*

IOC Version 4.3 Update Complete

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) cc jerryoldenettle

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) cc jerryoldenettle

My son, fear thou the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change: (Proverbs 24:21 KJV)

The update to IOC Version 4.3 is now completed. Along with the spelling changes shown in Working On IOC 4.3 Version – Name Changes, here are some more of the changes that were made.

They added 7 new birds, most raised from a Subspecies to a Species and 3 deleted, which were lowered to a Subspecies.

Lineated Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes albolineatus) ©Taenos

Lineated Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes albolineatus) ©Taenos

The Lineated Woodcreeper had 3 subspecies raised to species. They are:

Duida Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes duidae) ©Taenos

Duida Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes duidae) ©Taenos

Duida Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes duidae)

Rondonia Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fuscicapillus) ©Taenos

Rondonia Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fuscicapillus) ©Taenos

Rondonia Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fuscicapillus)

Layard's Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes layardi) ©Taenos

Layard’s Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes layardi) ©Taenos

Layard’s Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes layardi)

The Inambari Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes fatimalimae) is one of the 15 new species discovered in Amazonia (IBC).

Here is a link to a photo of the Inambari Woodcreeper.

Seychelles Black Parrot (Coracopsis barklyi) (photo) was a subspecies of the Black Parrot.

Another new species discovered in  the Amazonia is the Inambari Gnatcatcher (Polioptila attenboroughi). (See 15 new species discovered in Amazonia)

Click to see photo of Inambari Gnatcatcher. (IBC)

Sorry about not being able to place the photos here, but some are so new, that the photos available are copyright protected.

The Deletions were the Lepe Cisticola (Cisticola lepe), Kimberley Pipit (Anthus pseudosimilis) and Long-tailed Pipit (Anthus longicaudatus).

What took the most time updating was moving birds from one family to another and adding some new Families in the Passerformes Order.

Lesser Melampitta (Melampitta lugubris) ©WikiC Drawing

Melampittidae – Melamampittas is a new family with the Lesser Melampitta.

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) cc jerryoldenettle

Blue-capped Ifrita (Ifrita kowaldi) ©© jerryoldenettle

Ifritidae – Ifrita used to be one of the unknown families. It has the Blue-capped Ifrit.

 

Plus they took the Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles & Blackbirds family  and threw it up in the air and resuffled the whole bunch of them.

Almost forgot there is also another new family, the Oreoicidae – Australo-Papuan Bellbirds Family.

For any other update information, check out IOC’s update page. Click here.

*

Birds of the World

Wordless Birds

*

 

 

 

Birds of the World – Icteridae Family – Oropendolas, Orioles & Blackbirds

Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) at LPZ

Crested Oropendola (Psarocolius decumanus) at LPZ by Lee

Then God said, “Let the waters abound with an abundance of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the face of the firmament of the heavens.” (Genesis 1:20 NKJV)

I have been working on finding photos for the Icteridae Family – Oropendolas, Orioles & Blackbirds. I have managed to get all by three of the species. Tried to find as many of the subspecies while working on the page.

There are 108 members in 27 Genera. They start off, taxonomic order, with the Oropendolas. We have enjoyed seeing the Crested Oropendola at the Lowry Park Zoo and the National Aviary. They make their hanging nest even there. Of the 11, I cannot find any photo of the Band-tailed Oropendola (Ocyalus latirostris). They have 3 Genus.

The Caciques are next with 12 members in two Genus; Cacicus and Amblycercus.

Then there are 3 Troupials in the Icterus Genus with Orioles; the Venezuelan, Orange-backed and Campo Troupials.

Then the Orioles appear next in the list. Those are some very pretty birds. There are 30 members in the Genus Icterus. Here in North America (US) we get to enjoy the Orchard, Hooded, Streak-backed, Spot-breasted, Altamira, Bullock’s, Baltimore, Scott’s and Audubon Orioles. (order by Stokes Guide). There is a Oriole Blackbird, but is not quite considered an Oriole. The Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi) is Critically Endangered and again I couldn’t find a photo, but did find a Bahamian Stamp with a picture of it.

Brown-and-yellow Marshbird (Pseudoleistes virescens) ©©CDTimm

Brown-and-yellow Marshbird (Pseudoleistes virescens) ©©CDTimm

Next the list alternates back and forth with Blackbirds and Grackles. Most are black with some colors. After 11 Genus of those, then 2 Marshbird are in the Pseudoleistes Genus.

A bird species that lands in my yard, the Brown–headed Cowbird is one of six Cowbirds. I have had as many as 50 Brown-headeds land in my yard and empty my feeders in no time flat. They are the Molothrus Genus. The Bronze-brown Cowbird (Molothrus armenti) escapes most photographers because no photos were found to use.

Peruvian Meadowlark (Sturnella bellicosa) By BirdPhotos.Com

Peruvian Meadowlark (Sturnella bellicosa) By BirdPhotos.Com

Going on down the list through more Blackbirds and Grackles, almost to the bottom, you find the Sturnella Genus which has the five Meadowlarks; Peruvian, Pampas, Long-tailed, Eastern and Western Meadowlarks.

After a Yellow-headed Blackbird, you end up with the Bobolink, which we just had an article about a few days ago. (That is why I worked on the page.) See The Christmas Bird? and an earlier one, Bobolink – Extraordinary Migrant.. Both are by ajmithra.

Photos missing for this family are listed below. If you have one you would allow us permission to use or let us link to your photo, please leave a comment. Thanks.

  • Band-tailed Oropendola (Ocyalus latirostris)
  • Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi) Critically Endangered
  • Bronze-brown Cowbird (Molothrus armenti)
  • Need subspecies

*

Bobolink – Extraordinary Migrant…

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) Pair ©©ramendan

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) Pair ©©ramendan

Bobolink – Extraordinary Migrant… ~ by a j mithra

Rice bird, meadow-wink, skunk blackbird, reed bird, butter bird—these various names for the member of the blackbird family most commonly known as the Bobolink reflect the diversity of ways in which humans have looked upon this gregarious songbird.

Nesting in the prairies and cultivated land of south Canada and the northern United States and wintering in the grasslands and marshes of Argentina, the Bobolink migrates at least 5,000 miles each way.

Bobolink Migration Route©WikiC

Bobolink Migration Route©WikiC

The Bobolink is an extraordinary migrant, traveling to south of the equator each autumn and making a round-trip of approximately 20,000 kilometers (12,500 mi). One female, known to be at least 9 years old, presumably made this trip annually, a total distance equal to traveling 4.5 times around the earth at the equator! These birds migrate to Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay. One bird was tracked flying 12,000 miles (19,000 km) over the course of the year, and up to 1,100 miles (1,800 km) in one day. The vast distance is more impressive in relation to the Bobolink’s diminutive size, averaging 7 inches in length, 11.5 inches in wingspan, and 1.5 ounces. in weight.

  • Feeling small?
  • Get ready to do greater things for God…
  • You know, God does not use boulders to stop the waves of the sea from entering the land..
  • But, He uses tiny grains of sand to do it..

God has designed this bird to travel long distances to encourage us that we too can do great and mighty things for God..

A little one shall become a thousand, and a small one a strong nation: I the LORD will hasten it in his time. (Isaiah 6:21)

God seems to have a liking to use small things to fulfill great missions..

  • He chose the small Miriam to find a way to take care of Moses..
  • He chose a small slave girl to bring healing to a Commander of an army..
  • He chose a little shepherd boy David to bring down a mighty giant..
  • He chose a small boy to feed the multitudes…

Here again, this small bird He uses to inspire us to do great things for God..

If this small bird can travel 4.5 times around the world at the equator in its life time, how much more God will expect from us? Most of rely on our strength that is the reason we find it so difficult to travel next door to share the gospel isn’t it?

What sense does it make to say, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me when we find it so difficult to stand for God?

But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. For if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his natural face in a glass: For he beholdeth himself, and goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was. But whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man shall be blessed in his deed. (James 1:22-25)

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) ©USFWS

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) ©USFWS

Bobolinks begin their journey northward in South America in early March, reaching Colombia and Venezuela in late April. From there, most take a route over the Caribbean Sea to the Florida peninsula, although some will cross the Gulf of Mexico from the Yucatan Peninsula to Louisiana and Texas. From there they fan northward and westward, arriving on the breeding grounds in May. These Birds breed in open grasslands and hay fields.

Bobolinks migrate at night. The distinctive “clink” notes of these nocturnal travelers can be heard as they pass overhead in large flocks, apparently using the earth’s magnetic field as a compass and the locations of the stars as a map.

  • Human race boasts about technology, innovation and inventions…
  • We feel great pride in finding unknown routes with the help of satellites and compass…

But, these birds use the earth’s magnetic field as compass and locations of the stars as a map…

  • How difficult it is for us to tread on unknown path?
  • When we worship in church we feel so good to call Jesus as the Brightest Morning Star…
  • Do we really turn towards this Morning Star to seek direction in life?
  • Who is our inspiration in life?

If God be with us who can be against us? But the million dollar question is, are we with God?

Great in counsel, and mighty in work: for thine eyes are open upon all the ways of the sons of men: to give every one according to his ways, and according to the fruit of his doings: (Jeremiah 32:19)

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) ©WikiC

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) ©WikiC

In summer, Bobolinks feed primarily on insects switching to grain crops as they migrate south. In migration and in winter uses freshwater marshes, grasslands, rice and sorghum fields.

Although the Bobolink typically feeds during the day, in migration, while building fat reserves for its long over water flight, it has been observed feeding in rice fields after dark on bright nights.

We all know that we are on the verge of migrating once and for all to heaven..

  • Have we stored reserves to migrate that long?
  • His words has the power to heal the broken and strengthen the weak…
  • His words shall never return empty…

My son, forget not my law; but let thine heart keep my commandments: For length of days, and long life, and peace, shall they add to thee. Let not mercy and truth forsake thee: bind them about thy neck; write them upon the table of thine heart: So shalt thou find favour and good understanding in the sight of God and man.

Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths. Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear the LORD, and depart from evil. It shall be health to thy navel, and marrow to thy bones. (Proverbs 3:1-8)

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) by J Fenton

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) by J Fenton

How many times do we read His words in a day? Maybe we should learn from these birds to eat His words even during our dark hours.

Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. (Psalm 119:105)

Judging by sight or sound, the Bobolink is a bird of distinction. Their song has been vividly described as

  • “a bubbling delirium of ecstatic music that flows from the gifted throat of the bird like sparkling champagne,”
  • “a mad, reckless song-fantasia, and outbreak of pent-up, irrepressible glee,” and as
  • “a tinkle of fairy music, like the strains of an old Greek harp.”

We may not be a good singer, yet, God loves to hear us sing. The reason for creating us is to sing, glorify and thank Him.  But, we seem to do every other thing except thanking Him…  Many of our prayers are unanswered, because, we have failed to thank when we pray..

Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. (Philippians 4:6)

Have a blessed day!

Your’s in YESHUA,
a j mithra

Please visit us at: Crosstree


The Bobolink is in the Icteridae Family of the Passeriformes Order

*

Yellow-rumped Cacique – The trusted Watchman

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Ian

Yellow-rumped Cacique – The trusted Watchman ~ by a j mithra

The caciques are Passerine birds in the New World Blackbird family. Members of the family are resident breeders in tropical South America and north to Mexico. The caciques are birds associated with woodland or forest. The Yellow-rumped Cacique is found in tropical South America from Panama to central Brazil.

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Daves BirdingPix

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Daves BirdingPix

It prefers Varzea forest edges, woodland and some semi-open habitats. The areas flooded in the annual cycle are extensive lowland and forested areas bordering the main river and its tributaries and are known by the Portuguese word várzea which means flooded plains are subject to annual flooding, with consequent soil enrichment; Trees in this zone survive flooding for several weeks annually and provide the basis of a food web that includes fish adapted…

They are very gregarious and large, noisy flocks can be seen flying over Amazon Rivers particularly at dawn and dusk as the flocks move from their overnight roost to their feeding grounds and back again. These birds prefer a place which is abundant in food and water…

There is abundance in the presence of Jesus, our Good Shepherd..

King David had experienced God’s abundance and that’s why he says,

The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters.” Psalm 23:1,2

These birds seem to know that flood brings in soil enrichment which in turn provides the basis of food web…

Are you in the midst of a flood?

Just remember this verse,

So shall they fear the name of the LORD from the west, and his glory from the rising of the sun. When the enemy shall come in like a flood, the Spirit of the LORD shall lift up a standard against him. Isaiah 59:19

Where there is flood, there the Spirit of the Lord lifts a banner..

Glory be to Jesus name!!!!!!!!!

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Ian

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Ian

Most are colonial breeders, with several long, hanging, bag-shaped nests in a tree, each suspended from the end of a branch and have their entrance at the upper side. The nests are occupied in the short dry season.

The birds don’t like bad weather; they leave the colony when it rains too much. Nests can be washed out of a tree by heavy rain. For more protection, a couple of males are always on watch and if a bird of prey comes in sight, they sound the alarm and the colony tree will be empty in no time.

God has set us as watchmen over His people to warm them to walk in The WAY..

If when he seeth the sword come upon the land, he blow the trumpet, and warn the people; Then whosoever heareth the sound of the trumpet, and taketh not warning; if the sword come, and take him away, his blood shall be upon his own head.

He heard the sound of the trumpet, and took not warning; his blood shall be upon him. But he that taketh warning shall deliver his soul.

But if the watchman see the sword come, and blow not the trumpet, and the people be not warned; if the sword come, and take any person from among them, he is taken away in his iniquity; but his blood will I require at the watchman’s hand.

So thou, O son of man, I have set thee a watchman unto the house of Israel; therefore thou shalt hear the word at my mouth, and warn them from me.” Ezekiel33:3-7

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Kent Nickell

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Kent Nickell

Some species choose a tree that also contains an active wasp nest as a deterrent to predators (e.g. toucans), and females compete for the best sites near the protection of the wasp nest. The wasps also repel Philornis flies which are attracted in enormous numbers by the birds’ smell. These flies are paratisized by a mite which then move on to the nestlings, many of whom die from the infestation.

The females make the nests, brood en raise the young and are more abundant than the males. These birds are not afraid of building their nests near a tree that contains wasp’s nest..

Is it because they know that,

And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose. Romans 8:28?

If Naaman had not turned into a leper, he wouldn’t have known God…

If Lazarus didn’t die, he wouldn’t have known the power of God…

After a nasty fall, if I had not dislocated my shoulder, I would surely have dislocated my hip..

Thank You Lord for Your saving grace and I also thank You for Sister Lee and the readers of this site who had prayed for my healing…

Bless them abundantly Lord in Jesus name …Amen

These are slim birds with long tails and a predominantly black plumage The relatively long pointed bill is pale greenish, yellowish or bluish, depending on species, and most caciques have blue eyes (at least when adult).

  • The female is typically smaller than the male.
  • Caciques eat large insects and fruit.
  • Most are gregarious and typically seen in small groups.
  • They are very vocal, producing a wide range of songs, sometimes including mimicry.
  • Males try to make an indelible impression on the females by showing their yellow feathers and flapping their wings.
Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Kent Nickell

Yellow-rumped Cacique (Cacicus cela) by Kent Nickell

Gold is called the Yellow metal and Gold denotes God’s glory…

God had been showing His glory and spreading His wings time and again to show how much He cares for us and longs for us to come under His wings..

But, there are still scores of them out there who are yet to know Him…

Are we doing something to reach the unreached?

The LORD recompense thy work, and a full reward be given thee of the LORD God of Israel, under whose wings thou art come to trust. Ruth 2:12

Have a blessed day!

Your’s in YESHUA,
a j mithra

Please visit us at:  Crosstree


Lee’s Addition:

We are continuing to pray for you, a j. Praying for your speedy recovery.

There are 12 Caciques are in the Icteridae – Oropendolas, Orioles & Blackbirds Family of the Passeriformes Order.

*